please recommend a chainsaw filing system

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jatoxico

Minister of Fire
Aug 8, 2011
4,354
Long Island NY
How does the Pferd avoid raising the tooth file out of the gullet if the rakers are too high?
 

JRHAWK9

Minister of Fire
Jan 8, 2014
1,728
Wisconsin Dells, WI
How does the Pferd avoid raising the tooth file out of the gullet if the rakers are too high?

This is what I am wondering too. I have the Pferd versions and just started using them. However those chains I'm using them on already have the depth gauges lowered properly. I was wondering how I was going to approach using it with a new chain, as I always take the depth gauges down on new chains. I'm thinking I'm going to have to make 3-4 passes with a flat file on each depth gauge before I use the 2in1 on a new chain.....for the exact reason you are inquiring about. Basically start using it when the depth gauges are already where I want them and use the 2in1 just to keep them that way.
 
Or you could try the 2in1 normally and adjust if you're not satisfied .. with the cutting
 

Zack R

Feeling the Heat
Sep 27, 2017
423
Sisters, OR
flic.kr
Do you have ripping chain or something? A 2 in 1 should work for any cross cut chain if you get it in the right pitch.

I run a full skip chain so the 2 in 1 won't work. On the flip side its easy enough to file without one since there are less teeth.

1611257364813.png
 
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jetsam

Minister of Fire
Dec 12, 2015
5,283
Long Island, NY
youtu.be
I have been using a Pferd (and a pair of calipers for measuring teeth) most of the time and a Granberg jig for overhauls.

I am currently making the jump from Granberg to an Oregon 520 grinder. Will still use my Pferd for 4 or 5 sharpenings, then use the grinder to get my angles and lengths back.

It's not something I needed to do, but I wanted to be able to bang out a couple chains on my way out to the woods, and that is not the speed the Granberg hand filing jig runs at. ;)
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
6,262
Downeast Maine
I have been using a Pferd (and a pair of calipers for measuring teeth) most of the time and a Granberg jig for overhauls.

I am currently making the jump from Granberg to an Oregon 520 grinder. Will still use my Pferd for 4 or 5 sharpenings, then use the grinder to get my angles and lengths back.

It's not something I needed to do, but I wanted to be able to bang out a couple chains on my way out to the woods, and that is not the speed the Granberg hand filing jig runs at. ;)
I am pretty quick with the Granberg, but I use it all the time. The thing that takes longest is getting the back stop adjusted right. To make things faster I put the jig in the same place, or close to it, every time. There's an older guy on youtube that is a wizard with his, but it's the older version. I'm not positive, but I think the Granberg wizard is also the author of this blog which goes into incredible detail on how to use the Granberg file jig to sharpen square ground chain with a three angle file.
 

Nealm66

Minister of Fire
Sep 25, 2020
1,077
Western Washington
I have been using a Pferd (and a pair of calipers for measuring teeth) most of the time and a Granberg jig for overhauls.

I am currently making the jump from Granberg to an Oregon 520 grinder. Will still use my Pferd for 4 or 5 sharpenings, then use the grinder to get my angles and lengths back.

It's not something I needed to do, but I wanted to be able to bang out a couple chains on my way out to the woods, and that is not the speed the Granberg hand filing jig runs at. ;)
I looked at them the last time I was at madsens. Bob took me back where they have a couple set up to grind chains for customers. The only thing that seems wanky is how they dress the stone. It’s a pig and a poke looking setup. Bob said it doesn’t really matter too much how the stone is dressed but it makes me wonder. I’d be curious how you like yours
 

peakbagger

Minister of Fire
Jul 11, 2008
6,597
Northern NH

jatoxico

Minister of Fire
Aug 8, 2011
4,354
Long Island NY
I am late to this thread but I use the Husqvarna roller filing guides. Not precision but I seem to get reasonable chain life.

DIY Chainsaw Sharpening - Roller File Guide and Depth Gauge Tool - Stihl Husqvarna Echo - YouTube

I agree with the video that the depth gauge part of the filing guide does not work well. I use something similar to the rig the guy on the video uses.
Same here. Used a pure freehand file first and the roller guide helps to take away mistakes with one of the angles you need to maintain. Agree on the taker guide. I don't really like it and mostly file with guide off and only use it as to check.
 
This is why I love the 2in1 you are doing both as you file .;)
 

jatoxico

Minister of Fire
Aug 8, 2011
4,354
Long Island NY
This is why I love the 2in1 you are doing both as you file .;)
I'd like to give it try but no one has answered my question, how does the Pferd maintain the correct tooth cutting height if you use it on a chain where the rakers are high?
 

jetsam

Minister of Fire
Dec 12, 2015
5,283
Long Island, NY
youtu.be
I looked at them the last time I was at madsens. Bob took me back where they have a couple set up to grind chains for customers. The only thing that seems wanky is how they dress the stone. It’s a pig and a poke looking setup. Bob said it doesn’t really matter too much how the stone is dressed but it makes me wonder. I’d be curious how you like yours

I already ordered a 3/16" CBN wheel for my .375 and .404 chains, so the only dressing I will be doing is on the .325 and raker grinding wheels. I left it split like that so I could get a feel for both systems (and also I don't sharpen that much .325 chain and CBN wheels are expensive).

I haven't even bolted it down yet, but I have a frozen up old dirt-filled stumping chain that I'll be running through the ultrasonic cleaner and then learning to grind on (probably this weekend).

I don't think my learning curve will be too bad because I've been filing chains for a long time, and it looks less complicated than my old Granberg hand filing jig!
 

jetsam

Minister of Fire
Dec 12, 2015
5,283
Long Island, NY
youtu.be
I'd like to give it try but no one has answered my question, how does the Pferd maintain the correct tooth cutting height if you use it on a chain where the rakers are high?

The brochure says it's automatic, but it's down to the user. It does a fine job if you stay awake.

It has two round files, two square files, and two permanent raker standoff bars in it. You can put the Pferd on the chain backwards and lose the height guidance from the standoff bars, and you can also put it on upside down and lose the raker file altogether. But if you put it on the chain so the round file is in the tooth, the square file is on the raker, and the guide bar (or whatever they call it) is on the opposite tooth, you'll get raker height at around .025" of the average height of the current tooth and the opposite tooth.

If the chain is all jacked up and the the tooth you're filing is a much different length from the one the guide bar is on, you may get a funny height and an angled cut on the raker, but at that point you have much larger problems anyway.

If I'm doing an on-the-bench Pferd sharpening, I avoid this kind of issue with a slide caliper. Find the shortest tooth and mark it (I use spray paint, sharpie is ok if the chain isn't too oily). Give it just a tiny touch-up with the Pferd, measure it again with the caliper, and use that measurement to set the length of every other tooth on the chain.

If the chain is in good shape you will get square-topped rakers, so go around again with a flat file and round the leading edge if you care about that.
 
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jatoxico

Minister of Fire
Aug 8, 2011
4,354
Long Island NY
The Pferd seems to get such praise around here that it may be my next sharpener once I wear out what I have.

Truthfully my needs are pretty minimal and as long as I keep my chains reasonably sharp and functional I'm happy.
 
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Nealm66

Minister of Fire
Sep 25, 2020
1,077
Western Washington
I already ordered a 3/16" CBN wheel for my .375 and .404 chains, so the only dressing I will be doing is on the .325 and raker grinding wheels. I left it split like that so I could get a feel for both systems (and also I don't sharpen that much .325 chain and CBN wheels are expensive).

I haven't even bolted it down yet, but I have a frozen up old dirt-filled stumping chain that I'll be running through the ultrasonic cleaner and then learning to grind on (probably this weekend).

I don't think my learning curve will be too bad because I've been filing chains for a long time, and it looks less complicated than my old Granberg hand filing jig!
You should clean the stone up with every chain. Maybe get away with a small, say up to 24” chain, if it’s just a touch up but if the next chain is a full grind then you should clean it before you start. Not sure the hardness of those stones. Usually the blue chisel bit stones are fairly hard
 

jetsam

Minister of Fire
Dec 12, 2015
5,283
Long Island, NY
youtu.be
You should clean the stone up with every chain. Maybe get away with a small, say up to 24” chain, if it’s just a touch up but if the next chain is a full grind then you should clean it before you start. Not sure the hardness of those stones. Usually the blue chisel bit stones are fairly hard

I ordered a 3/16" CBN wheel for the chains I use most because I wasn't crazy about the idea of a grinding wheel that changes shape and diameter constantly as you use it.

I probably won't be doing too much touch up work on the grinder (after the "new toy glow" wears off anyway)- I drop a stump vise in my pocket and do that with the Pferd in the woods. The grinder is a faster way to get my Pferded-up chains back to spec in terms of angle and tooth length.

I am embarrassed to say that my angle drift is much worse on chains with no witness marks than it is on chains that have them!
 
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o_O
 

DodgyNomad

Minister of Fire
Dec 19, 2009
686
West Michigan
Also, this whole thread is moot because it turns out you can just put a rat tail file in a drill and take care of business. Who knew. ;lol


That looks like one of the worst ways to sharpen a chain with precision that I've ever seen. No way that guy can consistently maintain tolerances, as he quickly shows in his video.

Hope he buys his chain in 100 foot rolls to keep his costs down.
 
I thought that video was for entertainment .. Only ..
1611672366014.png
 

DodgyNomad

Minister of Fire
Dec 19, 2009
686
West Michigan
1611673423699.png


Who makes that chain ... o_O
 

EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
1,470
SE North Carolina
I thought I was ok hand filing with just the angle guide. It worked good enough until I upgraded to a 52” bar to mill with. 156 drivers full house by hand all while not taking the chain or the milling setup off the bar isn’t something I want to to do every 2-3 cuts. That said after about 5 tanks I do kind of want a break. I appreciate all the recommendations.

Evan