Transporting a stove on its' side?

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bdahlmann

New Member
Dec 17, 2010
4
Maine
Hello,
Am curious to query the collected wisdom concerning the following scenario;

I will soon be driving several hours to pick up a stove purchase. I have two vehicles from which to choose for the journey. One which is slow, loud, and expensive to drive, but will easily fit the stove, the alternative is otherwise pragmatic, save that the crate would need to lie on its' side.

Would I be foolhardy to consider the more comfortable ride at the risk of damaging the firebricks and such? Or perhaps this can be done without too much concern?

Any opinions would be appreciated.
 

Mad Tom

Member
Jan 19, 2010
244
Vermont
side? or do you mean front or back. i would try it if it was my only option. If I had a choice between front or back i would lie it on its back. Just to keep the fire bricks from possibly falling and going through the expensive glass. At least with my brand and model.
Either way, I would bring blocking in various thicknesses to support it.
 

BrotherBart

Modestorator
Staff member
What stove are we talking about here?
 

BrotherBart

Modestorator
Staff member
Sounds like you bought that new one in the crate in New Hampshire. There shouldn't be any firebrick or breakable baffle in a 1980 Jotul Turbo but who knows? There were only about a thousand of them made back in 1980. Not gonna find anybody here that has ever seen one I bet.

Do not dare light a fire in that valuable museum piece.
 

shawneyboy

Minister of Fire
Oct 5, 2010
1,592
NE PA
Personally, I would spend the couple bucks to transport it upright.
 

firefighterjake

Minister of Fire
Jul 22, 2008
19,151
Unity/Bangor, Maine
I too would transport it upright . . . I figure there may be a reason every stove I see transported in a crate or out of a crate is almost always standing upright.
 

Backwoods Savage

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2007
27,812
Michigan
It all would depend on the stove. Some stoves; no problem. Others, maybe a problem. If it has firebrick it is usually simple to pull the brick out before transporting the stove.
 

Hanko

Minister of Fire
Feb 26, 2008
795
livingstion co, Michigan
If you haul it on its side, all the molecules will run to the low side, your fire will be lop sided
 

Mad Tom

Member
Jan 19, 2010
244
Vermont
BrotherBart said:
Sounds like you bought that new one in the crate in New Hampshire. There shouldn't be any firebrick or breakable baffle in a 1980 Jotul Turbo but who knows? There were only about a thousand of them made back in 1980. Not gonna find anybody here that has ever seen one I bet.

Do not dare light a fire in that valuable museum piece.
I saw that add. Would love to see that stove up close and run it through it's paces.
 

WoodNStuff

Minister of Fire
Oct 12, 2011
564
South Central WI
I just picked up my Jotul F 602 today. I called the dealer this morning at 10:00, saying that I wanted to pick it up. The dealer didn't have one in the showroom but Saturdays are their day to run to the warehouse to stock up. Since their guy was still loading, he called him up. At first they said that they already had a full load, so I said I'd come next week. Then about five minutes later he calls me back saying they got it on this load so I should come pick it up after 12:00 pm.

When I got their, it was uncrated, standing upright. Looks beautiful. He was helping me load it in my mini-van, when I asked whether it was safe to transport it on its side. He said that's how they managed to fit in this load. So, I laid it on its side atop some carpet. The dealer had stuffed cardboard in the firebox to prevent the cast panels from moving. This stove handled the two hour ride home.

By the way, I carried the thing in the house by myself. That thing is supposed to weigh 160. It seemed like a heavy 160. Maybe I'm just getting old?

All in all, I agree with Backwoods Savage - depends on the stove.
 
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