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.050 vs .058 Gauge Bar & Chain

Post in 'The Gear' started by ManiacPD, Jan 21, 2009.

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  1. ManiacPD

    ManiacPD Member

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    I'm getting ready to purchase a new Husky and would appreciate if someone could give me the pros & cons on the different gauges of bar/chain combinations.

    Thanks in advance for your help!

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  2. ManiacPD

    ManiacPD Member

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    OOPS, wrong Forum...

    Mr. Moderator, please bump me over to the Gear Room...thanks...
  3. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    As you wish, Master. Rick
  4. fyrwoodguy

    fyrwoodguy Feeling the Heat

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    i would suggest running .058 gauge saw chain.there is much less chain stretch.and when the guide bar becomes worn,you can up grade to .063 provided the bar rails are the same height and NOT an UNEVEN HEIGHT. with .050 there is the most chain stretch,hemce chain derailment occurs more often.

    laminated guide bars are a good learning tool,but no replaceable roller nose,and limited life span.original equipment on most saws.

    solid one piece w/ replaceable roller nose guide bars are the best.
  5. jdemaris

    jdemaris New Member

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    The thicker the drive tangs, the more metal contact area and less wear on the sprocket - but not by much.

    I was going to buy a Husky awhile back, but refused it because the dealer only had the .058" bars. Not for me, but my reasons are specific. I don't hand sharpen anymore and I have about 20 chains - all 3/8" .050 or .063 in 16", 20", and 32". If I dull a chain, I take it right off and install another. I machine sharpen later. Mostly big Stihl saws. When I was shopping for a new saw, I wanted to make sure I could swap chains back and forth. If the Husky had an .050" or .063" bar, my chains would fit. Dealer only had .058". So, I didn't buy it and got a Makita Dolmar instead. I'm glad now I did. It's a fantastic saw. Came with two 72 link - 20" .050" chains.
  6. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    .050 is the new standard not as wide as the 58 but cuts a little faster
  7. ManiacPD

    ManiacPD Member

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    Thanks to all who replied. I couldn't imagine .008" would make much difference but I wanted to check for sure.

    Thanks again,

    Paul
  8. jdemaris

    jdemaris New Member

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    Back in the late 60s and early 70s, the Stihl saws used .063" gauge chain on just about everything. I assume because they used 3/8" and .404 and the .404 only came in .063" at the time. This way, the same bars worked with either. Now, it's not so easy to find .063" 3/8" chain. Also, I often grab the wrong chains, it gets confusing. An .063" chain doesn't fit an .050" bar very well unless it's really beat up and worn.

    If everything was .050", all would be just fine and a lot easier to figure out (in my opinion).
  9. ManiacPD

    ManiacPD Member

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    I guess I'll go with the .050 then. No worry about mixing chains as the new saw will have an 18" or 20" bar, and the 345 is a 16".

    Thanks
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