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1st woodstove, last night was first night. first post!

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by CHeath, Feb 18, 2013.

  1. ArsenalDon

    ArsenalDon Minister of Fire

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    It all depends...if you cut into it and it looks rotted...lots and lots of pores showing...for lack of a better term....that is rotted and what they call punky..look for solid wood and then it should be ok. If you can get a hold of a moisture meter then look for less than 20% moisture in the wood you cut and then it is ok to go.

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  2. ArsenalDon

    ArsenalDon Minister of Fire

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    go cut into it....it is the only way to know for sure
  3. CHeath

    CHeath Member

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    Sweet ill check it out. One thing Im trying to understand is that I've read all over that my flue pipe temps need to be 300 to 500 degrees to keep from building creosote. Well take just now, I just went down and filled it up. It had a nice bed of coals and after it was full and one draft closed the slide draft half open. Well the flue temp won't get to 300 tonight at all. With the draft off, it's just idling and I'm trying to make it last till morning when I get up. The last 2 morns I had very few coals to build on but I left the draft on both wide open. Hopefully it won't go out!!!!! LoL

    Thanks guys !!
  4. ArsenalDon

    ArsenalDon Minister of Fire

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    invest in an IR thermo...the coil ones are useless. mine reads over 100::F more than the IR
  5. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    Usually pine with no bark is burnable & reasonably dry.
    (as long as it's not punky/rotten anyway)
    Not saying it's perfect, but probably better than any wood you can buy now.
    Good luck
    Shane N likes this.
  6. CHeath

    CHeath Member

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    I've got one. That's how I've been checking temps. It's will drive u nuts because its impossible and too many variables to get it to a temp so I'm just going to go by the flame.
  7. ansehnlich1

    ansehnlich1 Minister of Fire

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    I'm jumpin in here again.

    I highly recommend checking for creosote in that chimney early in your burning process and often.

    You have an elbow right off the top then a pretty good run into that chimney, that'll slow down your draft. I have not seen where your chimney is lined with 6 in. stainless and/or insulated. If it's not, and it's oversized terracotta, then that'll slow your draft down too.

    Your chimney is the most important part of your setup. If it ain't right your draft will suffer and you will produce creosote.
  8. CHeath

    CHeath Member

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    Aaaaack!!! Had a nice bed of hot coals last night around 11pm. So I filled it up with some dry oak. It wasn't wet on the ends or middle but I didn't cut into any of it to see. I filled it with about 5 good size sticks. 5 to 7 inch in diameter. Left the door open for about 10 min just to get it goin good then I cut the bottom draft off and the slide draft on top halfway open. At 1230 I went down there and it was just a few coals burning in the bottom. I was pissed! Lol. So I opened up the door, let it catch up again and left the door open till 1245 then when I closed it I left all drafts wide open. This morning was 75 in here and nice but the vents were not even luke warm. When I went down, it was completely out. I'm sure I could have gotten some leaves goin but I'm gonna empty the pan later so it's all out. I am learning. I just wished it would last a little longer. It's all about the fuel for sure.
  9. basod

    basod Minister of Fire

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    You've got a few things working against you on the burn times: Fuel,draft and experience
    I looked up the Englander 28-3500, it'll take 25" wood. So if cutting any of your own go atleast 24", this will allow you to fill the firebox(they don't give the actual dimensions of the firebox) but you'll be limited to door opening. Split smaller to aid in drying, when you start stacking for the future leave some hardwoods-oak/hickory/locust at bit larger for overnight burns
    Dead barkless pine can be a bit of a booger this time of year as it has been getting rained on and will stay wet due to the cooler temps split stack loosely and top cover(don't tarp the entire pile)

    Now the draft issue is probably giving you an initial "poor" experience. Your stove controls won't act correctly becuase you have a 'slammer" install.
    Opening the air for 10minutes and then closing it down isn't enough to get the wood going completely, you may have to extend this 20-30minutes.
    The stove is designed for a 6" flue dumping the gases into an expanded space( the terracotta liner) allows it to expand and cool faster, reducing the draft and pull of fresh combustion air into the stove.

    You may want to check out the hearthroom for ideas and advice on getting a liner installed over this coming summer - while your splitting and stacking wood of course:)
  10. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    I would change that hot air duct line to all metal asap......
  11. TimJ

    TimJ Minister of Fire

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    why does everyone say fill the firebox ???
  12. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Welcome to the nuthouse! You're going through the same learning curve that many many MANY have gone through, so be patient....and listen. You'll learn alot in this forum (as lots of good info has already been given to you in this thread).

    First, any tree that is laying down, even with the bark off of it, is most likely going to be way too damp to burn efficiently. It's just the nature of the beast. Wood needs to be split and stacked off of the ground to season and dry out.....preferably in a sunny and breezy location, but you mainly need the breeze. As we all have "run into wet wood" or "didn't expect to go through that much and need to burn green wood", trust me, GET AS FAR AHEAD AS YOU CAN. Install these four words into your woodburning checklist....THREE YEARS TO SEASON. Now, not all wood needs three years, but oak, hickory, and a few others need that much (or more) to be ready to give optimum heat.....you'll be amazed when you see it for yourself. Try, as hard as it may seem, to get a feel for what you are going to need in a season, and triple that amount. It's hard to first do that, I mean for me that meant getting at LEAST 18 cord. Well, this fall I had over 25 cord (four years worth), and all I really need to replace this year is what I used this year, it's that easy. All my wood has FOUR years to season now, and that makes a HUGE difference with alot of dense hardwood. Anyway, I'm sure you'll learn by spending time in here what it's going to take. In a year from now, you'll look back at what you learned and will laugh because you will have become better and better at heating with wood.....

    This is a great brotherhood (and sisters, too) of people all with a passion for woodburning......you'll fit in just fine around here and you WILL learn a lot!
  13. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Just remember that it is all too easy to accept an easy answer. But is it the correct answer? fwiw, yes, you can get creosote after only one burn.
    ScotO likes this.
  14. alex johnson

    alex johnson New Member

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    Hello sir, Nice looking basement. I am with Dennis on the long season on oak. I cut a standing dead white oak with not one ounce of bark, Fell the tree and the whole trunk portion was still wett. For your chiminey. For every 90 degree bend in your flue you need at least 5 foot of vertical rise. My suggestion for your flue is to turn it into a A 45 degree angle with a little rise out your stove, and then angled towards the flue connection portion of your fire place. Do you have a fireplace on the main floor? Your house is 30 years old, i can imagine it's pretty airtight. you might have to poke some holes in the wall. lol Good luck

    llll
  15. mfglickman

    mfglickman Minister of Fire

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    Sorry Dennis, I'm a little intense these days. Didn't mean to scare you...
  16. CHeath

    CHeath Member

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    Taking all the advice in. The main and by far most important thing to me is safety. I can't afford a problem. I did the install myself and yes I'm new but I do know a bit about how a stove works. I took extra precautions but I keeping the flue pipe over 300 and under 500 is impossible. I have a nice thick bed of coals and the box is full. I've cracked the drafts for an extended burn and its warming up nicely up here but the flue temp is 230 to 250.
  17. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Do you have a stainless steel insulated liner in your masonry flue? What kind of thermometer are you using? The cheap, mechanical thermometers are not very accurate, I know this because i have one on my singlewall pipe directly above the stove and it rarely ever goes over 300....but when I check it with my Fluke IR thermometer it's reading up around the 450-500 range almost all the time during a burn......
  18. CHeath

    CHeath Member

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    I'm using the Stanley IR
  19. CHeath

    CHeath Member

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    finally some decent coals this morn. I didnt rekindle because its suposed to be warm today. Thanks you guys for all the help.
  20. BillsWS

    BillsWS Feeling the Heat

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    CHeath, welcome to the forum. Nice looking set-up. Keep reading here, these guys (and gals) will get you burning like a pro in no time. Be safe.
  21. heaterman

    heaterman Minister of Fire

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    Let's cut right to the chase here.

    You need to get some dry wood. Period.
    Paying a little more for that the first year will be a far cry less expensive than a creosote caused chimney fire, which is what you may be lining yourself up for with that green wood.
    If you see bubbling out of the end of the log as it burns, it's wet and not ready for use.

    Buy yourself a moisture meter (as little as $35-40) and check your wood. If you go shopping for some seasoned wood that's been cut and split, take the moisture meter along and findout if it is really seasoned or not. Ask the guy to split a piece and test that so you get an accurate internal moisture content. If it's much over 25% it's not ready.

    If you can't find any decent wood, I would shut the stove down and wait until next season. You only have a few weeks of cold weather at your location before it starts to get mild so any savings this year do not outweigh the chance of a tarred up chimney and the increased probability of a chimney fire.

    In any case, right now is when you want to be putting up next seasons wood or maybe even 2014-15. Having firewood ready to go in only 6-7 months is kinda iffy.

    Not trying to bash your decisions here, just helping you avoid what can be a very costly error. :)
    jharkin likes this.
  22. alex johnson

    alex johnson New Member

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    That's crazy, I heat with only wood, no gas service to my house. My last electric bill was 138 and some change for 4 months. Wood heat is the only way to go. 900 is the reason energy companys built such big yachts. Good luck
    smokinj likes this.
  23. CHeath

    CHeath Member

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