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3 pt. powered chippers ?

Post in 'The Gear' started by Jack Fate, Apr 21, 2013.

  1. Jack Fate

    Jack Fate Feeling the Heat

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    Loc:
    Northwest Ohio
    My brother ask about tractor powered chippers, ask if I knew of any (other than DR) Figured someone here may know & maybe have some insight. The DR is $3000 & will take 4-5" diameter .Sounds like a waste of good firewood to me:p

    He no longers burns wood & where he lives does not allow open burning of ANY kind <>

    Funny around me people burn everything,:rolleyes: even things that won't burn
    cheers

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  2. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

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    Frontier makes many implements for cuts and tractors


    Most cities here don't allow open burning and towns usually require a permit from the FD , some even requiring a FD inspection prior to burning. Not supposed to burn hay, leaves and of course things like poison ivy, but people do. With all the hurricane and storm tree damage this Winter there's a lot of peoples burning. I'd rather just break branches up into reasonable small pieces for maximum ground contact so they rot eventually. But I have woods to toss them in too.
    Some towns even require seasonal permits for chimineas and fire pits. With a phone call required to the local FD any time you're going to light up.
  3. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    BearCat. Uhhhhhh, BearCat, and mmmmmm BearCat! lol. Best I've seen out there. Awesome blades. They make a ton of 'em too so they are bound to have one that does just what you want it too. Word to the wise, if you plan on feeding big limbs (over 3-4") or processing large volumes of material regularly, go hydraulic feed. Otherwise you will spend a LOT of time feeding the machine and sharpening the blades on a self-feeder. (aka. Gravity feed)

    http://bearcatproducts.com/products/pto_machines/

    Actually, Frontier is a collection of implements built by other companies and sold via John Deere dealers. The implements are made by the likes of Woods, Landpride, etc.... Generally good stuff too.
  4. Piston

    Piston Member

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    I have a Vermeer PTO powered 3 pt chipper with hydraulic feed. It has a 6" capacity. I have never seen a more heavy dutyn3 pt chipper in this size range, the chipper weighs in at 1400lbs, which is about double what some of them are. Vermeer no longer makes PTO chippers however, but if you ever came across a used one in good shape I can highly recommend them.

    As MM said, hydraulic feed really is nice when chipping, even on the smaller branches. Of course, it adds considerable cost to the chipper unfortunately, especially the fully self contained hydraulic models (pump driven off PTO so no tractor hydraulics needed).

    I did a lot of research on chippers before I purchased mine. I wanted to purchase a used chipper to save money, as I couldn't justify the high cost of a new one. I decided that if I couldn't find a chipper (had to be hydro feed) within a year of when I started searching, then I would pony up and buy new. I settled on the Wallenstein BX62R as the one I would purchase. Wallenstein has many many happy chipper customers and the thing that convinced me to buy that one if I had to go new, was the rectangular feed chute. It has a 6" capacity but the feed chute is actually 6X12, so I could fit slabs in there from my portable sawmill and not worry about the width. I've also read that it is helpful with limbs that have a lots of branches coming off them as it is easier to feed, however I don't have any personnel experience with this.

    A lot depends on tractor PTO hp, capacity needed, and of course budget being the most important. These chippers are expensive, and sometimes it makes a lot more sense to just rent or hire it out. I myself really like having the chipper around and will probably never sell it, I know it will outlast me with proper maintenance.
  5. Jack Fate

    Jack Fate Feeling the Heat

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    Northwest Ohio

    Thanks for your detailed answer

    I know Vermeer $$$$$$ your in it for a living , ya undoubtedly the best there is!

    Realistically my brothers gets good stuff & you don't need to convince him about the advantage of hydraulics he's been there since the 70's , he loves hydraulics & diesels . But he's 70 & running low on ambition or health ? I know he'd prefere hyd. Version but when you double the price or in the case of Vermeer x10 well he don't do used ( me neither ) see we don't make a living with our tools , but we do really appericiate the good stuff

    Cheers thanks will look up the w brand you mentioned
  6. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    My tractor is still covered in sap which is a side effect of PTO chipping. I din't know this and let the sap harden so I get to do some cleaning. All to say that I've spent many hours feeding PTO chippers.

    On the size thing. Bigger is always better and has very little to do with what size of material you actually wish to chip. An 8-16" chipper would allow you to pitch in curved branches, branches with forks, and multiple branches at one time. The biggest PITA when chipping is when the hydraulic feed starts slipping because you pushed too much oddly shaped stuff in at once and then you have to pull everything back out. You don't chip one little branch at a time, these things feed pretty slowly so you'll be able to shove in another branch while the machine is still eating the previous one and you need a wide inlet chute to do it.

    Hydro or power feed only. If you can't afford this then don't buy a PTO chipper. Instead look for an old tow behind "chuck and duck" chipper that sucks in logs fast.
    Jack Fate likes this.
  7. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    I've seen some gravity feed units that work well but you must be willing to swap/sharpen blades 2-3X as often as with a power feed.
  8. Jack Fate

    Jack Fate Feeling the Heat

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    Thanks all will let him read these posts . He does do Internet , funny he was a computer teacher at one time.

    Cheers
  9. blades

    blades Minister of Fire

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    I have a bear cat 5" selfpowered it has been good to me, they make pto units with Hydro feed up to 9" ( if anything like my 5" it will do the 9") Pto hp 35 min.
  10. Piston

    Piston Member

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    Loc:
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    I know you said he won't buy hydro feed because of the cost, and I can absolutely understand that, so I won't try to convince you/him otherwise.
    I have read (but never used in real life so take this with a grain of salt) that the Wallenstein self feed chippers have an advantage over others as far as how well they self feed. Some people claim they don't feel the need for hydro feed with the Wallenstein design. I don't know how true this is but it's worth mentioning.

    Also, for anyone else that reads this post down the road that is considering hydraulic feed, there are some chippers today that have a feed sensor on them that will automatically slow, or stop, the feed when the flywheel (blades) start to bog down from too much material/not enough power, then when it senses the proper rpm it will start feeding the material again. I know this is available on the Bearcat/Woods chippers and I imagine on other makes as well.

    PTO HP is really going to determine what you can chip, regardless of the size chipper you buy. You can run a 6" chipper with a 25hp PTO, but don't plan on regularly chipping anything more than 3" in diameter (less if dry hardwoods)

    My 40hp PTO can run on fast feed with 3-4" material all day long, as fast as I can feed it. I can chip 5" softwood on medium feed but for 6" hardwood I have to set it to slow feed.
    I cleaned up a pile of softwood limbs after a few blow downs, my father and I couldn't keep up with the chipper, this lasted 3 hrs. We had to take breaks but it didn't, the limbs were anywhere from 2"-6" with the majority in the 3-4" range. We could have had a 3rd person and worked the chipper more efficiently.

    What size tractor does your brother have?
  11. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    Oh and wear hearing protection. These things are loud.
    MasterMech likes this.
  12. Jack Fate

    Jack Fate Feeling the Heat

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    Best guess 33hp Jd so 27 pto ? It's a 1999 4200 I think with 150 hrs on it . I plan on telling him about the wallenstien ,found "some " dealers 50+ mi
    No prices on line

    Thanks
  13. Jack Fate

    Jack Fate Feeling the Heat

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    Double/ plugs & muffs I live most of my life this way (industrial worker& audiophile )

    Thanks I've carried ear plugs in my shirt now 30 yrs.
  14. Piston

    Piston Member

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    Check out both the Wallenstein BX32 and BX42 chippers (3" and 4" max capacity). The JD 4200 is 26hp/21PTO. I would think your pushing the limits with the 4" capacity with 21hp. 3" might be a lot more realistic though.
    If your brother has the JD4400 which is 36hp/29PTO then you may be okay with the 4" capacity BX42.

    http://www.embmfg.com/Forestry/Chippers/BXs.aspx

    You should be able to find the BX42 for somewhere around $2700-$3000. The BX32 would of course be a bit cheaper, I'm not sure how much.

    Hope this helps.
    -Matt
  15. glennm

    glennm Burning Hunk

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    I have a bxm32 for my bx23 and it is great! Self feeds well. Absolutely wear hearing protecting! I like the mulch feature on this unit, if I didn't get this I would purchase the bx42 for the larger chute. I burn any larger limbs but the larger opening would handle more branches and twisted pieces
  16. Jack Fate

    Jack Fate Feeling the Heat

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    Northwest Ohio
    Yes very helpful, don't remember the JD model for sure .It is a heavier framed ,it has the 400 series loader on it
    When I looked it up few yrs. back their was at least 2 different engine opt for his model


    will give him this info sunday

    thanks, great details

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