66,000 lb mass heater

fox9988 Posted By fox9988, Jun 1, 2013 at 9:44 AM

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. fox9988

    fox9988
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 15, 2012
    616
    197
    Loc:
    NW Arkansas
    My home has acid stained concrete floors through out. Its a very effective heat sink. So, between the 66,000 lbs of concrete and the ~8000 lbs of drywall, I don't think the mass of my 4'x8'x1' masonry hearth, the 8'x12' stone mantle wall, or the 440 lbs of soapstone (1800 lbs total?) even make a drop in the bucket. A quick run of the #'s show 1.3 million btu's stored in the slab. I used to live in a wood floored crawl space house, heated up-cooled down much faster. I much prefer the heat sink effect. Opinions?
     
  2. brian89gp

    brian89gp
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Mar 15, 2008
    500
    99
    Loc:
    Kansas City
    My house has 18" thick solid brick walls, though wood floors with a basement. For the most part I like it a lot except for certain times in the spring/fall where the wall is cool and cooling the house, but the humidity is super high. Have to turn the A/C on and freeze myself out to knock the humidity down to make it comfortable. It is also odd on those days where it has been 80+ for weeks on end then drops down to the 40's, my A/C is still running cause the wall is still at 80* and warming the house up. Or the times where it will be in the 40 range and then have a heat snap up to 80, furnace is still running cause the house is cold. My walls have a rough 5-7 day lag on outdoor temp.
     
  3. fox9988

    fox9988
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 15, 2012
    616
    197
    Loc:
    NW Arkansas
    Dehumidifier would be cheaper to operate. The lag in temp change could also be a good thing, during a 5 day cold snap in the spring:no heat needed. I'm guessing the walls arn't insulated?
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page