1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Add on Wood Furnace

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by sbatzold, Jan 29, 2013.

  1. sbatzold

    sbatzold Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2008
    Messages:
    38
    Loc:
    Central NY
    My father is looking to replace his 30 year old add on wood furnace. Does anyone have any suggestions? His current one is a Sure-Fire 101A 110-140,000 BTU unit. His house is 3,00sf+

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. sloeffle

    sloeffle Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2012
    Messages:
    100
    Loc:
    Morrow County, Ohio
    I would recommend searching the forum via the search function or in google paste in the below:

    site:hearth.com "wood furnace"
  3. JustWood

    JustWood Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,450
    Loc:
    Arrow Bridge,NY
    Caddy, Woodchuck (Meyer Mfg), and Yukon-Eagle are some of the better ones.
    I have a Woodchuck and am happy with it. I think there are better to be had.
    I started out with an englander. Cheap but not very efficient and not easily controlled.
  4. laynes69

    laynes69 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2006
    Messages:
    1,809
    Loc:
    Ashland OH
    Look at his heat load, even though his old woodfurnace is that large, it may be oversized. If he has a newer home that's well insulated then he could go with a smaller unit. At 3,000 sqft, I would look into a larger furnace like a Max Caddy made by PSG. One of the largest clean burning furnaces on the market. The modern furnaces like the Caddy line and Kuuma's are higher in price, but the clean burning capabilities and wood reduction make it worth it, as well as longer burns. Unlike the old furnace though, the newer models require well seasoned wood. Wood that's split and stacked for a year or better is optimum. Wood like hickory and oak may require 2 years to season.

Share This Page