1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

Advice needed

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by HollowHill, May 8, 2011.

  1. Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle

    Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 27, 2008
    Messages:
    5,011
    Loc:
    Ridge, LI, NY

    Actually, Dune, I didn't think that this was an appropriate thread to continue that topic.


    The woman is trying to heat her home. She needs help. We're here. It's what we do.


    I did, actually think you would appreciate the "current foe". My bad.


    HH still needs to heat her house.............

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Dune

    Dune Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2008
    Messages:
    2,806
    Loc:
    Commonwealth Of Massachussetts
    Sorry Eileen, I wasn't trying to be troublesome.
  3. snowleopard

    snowleopard Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2009
    Messages:
    1,494
    bbnbn
    [/quote] We can also help you with the wood purchasing process if you are interested in learning from other people's mistakes--since life is too short to make them all yourself. Let us know.
  4. HollowHill

    HollowHill Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2009
    Messages:
    667
    Loc:
    Central NY
  5. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan
    It depends upon the pickup and how it is loaded. Is it stacked? Thrown in loose? What kind of wood is it? And being down in log form does not mean too much. We count drying time only after it has been cut to length and split then stacked. Once the wood is split then you have surface exposed to air. Before it is split, only the ends will dry because of the bark holding in the moisture.

    Again, I like to stress the type of wood you are buying. Is it oak? Is it maple? Hard maple or soft? Ash? Hickory? Poplar? Pine? etc., etc. There is a big difference in types of wood. There are many charts available on the Internet to see how many btu's are in various types of wood but unfortunately, not many know all the types of wood when they see it. Shoot, I was a logger and even a sawyer and a farmer and there are many I still have a problem identifying! And I've been at this game for a year or two or three or........


    Have you considered purchasing a truck load of logs? They would dump them in your yard or wherever you want it and then it would only be a case of cutting and splitting. Many do that and it can work out great. It might even be a way to get that youngun up and at the job! Or maybe someone would stop in and help out on the cutting some day.
  6. HollowHill

    HollowHill Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2009
    Messages:
    667
    Loc:
    Central NY
    Backwoods, the seller with the downed logs is selling maple (sugar and silver) and some ash. He is willing to split it small (3 - 6") and deliver it before the end of May, $65 a face cord delivered. So far this has been the best I've been able to come up with. I'd really like to have the wood stacked by Memorial Day.

    I am considering getting a load of logs later this summer, when my bank account recovers ;) for next year's supply, but I don't think it's feasible for this year's supply, not enough time to get it processed.
  7. snowleopard

    snowleopard Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2009
    Messages:
    1,494

    A face cord is an incomplete measurement, as I understand it.It means a stack of wood that is four feet high, eight feet long, and however deep the dealer felt like cutting it--thus, an 18" face cord is going to have half again as much wood as a 12" one. Ask the dealer to explain what he means by that, or get the dimensions of the truck bed and calculate what percentage of 128 c.f. that is. You may wish to ignore the information about the wood, as it is specific to our northern woods, but it has some good info about calculating wood loads per pickup truck load. (Table is in the upper right.) http://www.google.com/urlsa=t&sourc...http://forestry.alaska.gov/pdfs/08BTUFirewood
    Handout.pdf&ei=cYDLTdm2Eoy6sQOCkL3JBg&usg=AFQjCNFmQflXZCQGkyxJxIhyGYrCv9qf6g&sig2=8ki8omYjOVhhlBcenn4C6g


    You never can tell what the summer may bring; keep your options open, and see what the wind blows in. Get a truckload, cut it into rounds, s/s over time. Or slowly process the tops in your woodlot the same way. Insulating the house, though, is something you can put in the bank.
    The trick is to find a balance, and sometimes we do that by going to extremes until we find the groove. Rough first years are common, but if heating with wood turns into an ongoing push that drains you and makes you old before your time, or gets someone hurt, then it's not worth it. It sounds like right now the family is counting on you to stay healthy, strong, and relatively unstressed, and that's more important than any house.
    When I found an opportunity to pay someone an affordable price for ten cords of birch, c/s/s, I jumped on it. That's three years of my primary heating wood for $500 a year. We can still go out this summer and cut birch and haul it home and process it, and add to the pile, but it's nice to know we don't have to. We may never buy wood again, but this gives us breathing room to figure that out, and allows for a more relaxed summer--something we all need. We'll still spend part of the summer bringing in dry poplar on the property to supplement the birch I bought, but that can be fun time together, not a stressful push to get it done before the snow flies.
  8. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2010
    Messages:
    819
    Loc:
    South Central Alabama
    I bought 5 p/u truck loads of oak back in January to get me started, I'm now scrounging as I can. The guy delivered the wood on a Chevy Silverado dually with a long bed *and* a toolbox in the back. Each load came up just a touch over the sides of the truck. Once stacked, each load was about as close to 1/2 cord as you could stack...maybe a few sticks more than a half cord on a couple of the loads.

    I'm curious about something pertaining to log length wood that has been laying for a year or so... After cutting wood on basically two differently aged clear-cuts I've found more punk in the downed logs in the older clear-cut. Does being in log lengths for an extended period of time cause punk to happen quicker than if the log was cut up in rounds for that same period of time? To me, the newbie that I am, it seems that a log length piece of wood would have a "vapor seal" around the length of it and thus trapping the moisture inside which would feed the microbes that cause the punk. I'm just getting through processing (I'm slow) some wood I scrounged from a local cemetery...probably 150 year old (minimum) red oak of some sort. This tree had been standing dead over a year after getting lightening struck...what I got were stems and limbs from the upper level...a fair amount of it was punky on the outside and this had been up off the ground the entire time. Once I split off the punk the good stuff inside was like crystallized honey or something....heavy and still wet. I have the punky stuff that I split off the rounds set aside for the firepit outside. ;)

    FWIW,
    Ed
  9. HollowHill

    HollowHill Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2009
    Messages:
    667
    Loc:
    Central NY
    Well, today I contacted a firewood dealer who was offering cords of mixed beech, maple, and cherry that was cut and split 6 - 8 months ago for $170 a cord. This seems almost too good to be true, but I think I've got to try it. He delivers 2 cord at a time, so, hopefully, I can figure out if he's on the up and up before I sink too much money into it. I'm trying my hardest not to hyperventilate, sure it's not a good bargaining ploy. Also played with my new splitter (logmatic wedge axe, only thing I'm rated to use without injuring someone) today. It worked extremely well with cherry, but then I came to this gnarly piece that looked like it had a neon yellow stain inside and was very stringy. Well, that just about did me in, don't know what it was, but I hate it! I can barely type, writing is out of the question, can't pick up a pen, lol ;) Methinks I have some conditioning to do... And buying the wood already split is looking like the wisest idea anyone has ever had ;)
  10. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan
    For sure I'd jump on that wood. Buy a cord and check it out. Make sure it is a cord too. The mix of beech, maple and cherry should be great. Anyway, if it is good, you could then order more. He probably would be happy to sell it now as almost everyone who buys wood waits until it is needed. Buy now means he gets to move some of his inventory and make a couple dollars. He'll probably treat you very fair. Good luck.
  11. snowleopard

    snowleopard Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2009
    Messages:
    1,494
    You may have osage orange, which would make you a very lucky lady indeed. That stuff has like 9M btu's to the cubic inch, or such.

    I know what you mean. I am trying hard to trust the universe with that wood order. Will believe it when I have it stacked and covered, and ringed w/trained attack moose to defend it.

    You're doing the Right Thing.
  12. Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle

    Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 27, 2008
    Messages:
    5,011
    Loc:
    Ridge, LI, NY
    HH, I'd jump on that wood @ $170, it's in the ball park for what we pay here, and the mix sounds pretty good. I've become a fan of cherry, it's a nice burning wood, with good heat.


    A good wood dealer is an awesome find. I have 2 that I can count on, which is good for me this year as I was not able to process wood due to some cracked ribs (3 weeks to go :-/ !!) We'll get started on 2012/2013 as soon as I am able.


    That stringy stuff could be elm, which can be a bear to split, even with a 27 ton. Another excellant burning wood, too.


    Sounds like your on the right path. You''l have enough, but ya might want to borrow some of Snow's attack meese to be on the safe side :)

    *edited because I can't spell this week
  13. HollowHill

    HollowHill Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2009
    Messages:
    667
    Loc:
    Central NY
    Well, Snow, let's hope things work out for both of us - stars have to align occasionally, right? I'd be over the moon to have wood worries out of the way for 3 years, that just sounds awesome.

    As to the trained attack moose (lol!!!), I have my own secret weapon - an overly enthusiastic golden retriever on epilepsy meds, which have caused him to lose what little self control he once possessed. Wood thief doesn't stand a chance, poor fool.

    Dixie, sorry to hear about the ribs. I hear that is quite painful, but imagine it will feel great to have them healed once more and get back at it. I do hope this dealer pans out. Elm does sound about right, we do have that around here. Of course, we have petrified wood, too, and it sure did feel like stone...
  14. homebrewz

    homebrewz Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2005
    Messages:
    957
    Loc:
    East Central, NY
    The stringy stuff is probably not osage orange, though it would nice if it was. I think some grows on the southern tier and western NY, but we usually don't see it around here.
    Its probably elm.

    Good luck, HH. Even if that stuff wasn't split a while back, cherry dries fairly fast. Beech, somewhat quickly, and maple less so.
  15. snowleopard

    snowleopard Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2009
    Messages:
    1,494
    Lightening-killed red oak from the local cemetary? That sounds like good wood to burn around the firepit when you're telling the stories that start out, "It was a dark and stormy night. . . "
  16. snowleopard

    snowleopard Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2009
    Messages:
    1,494
    When I was zooming home the other day to get my truck so I could grab some pallets, I passed a fuel oil truck headed the other direction. It reminded me of what all the push was about, why I was doing this. I've been thinking about the cool springs when winter ran on and on, and I'd be fretting a bit about getting low on fuel, planning ahead for my next delivery. Nice to not feel so pressed about that. I still hope to get my boiler repaired, and fill up the tanks--but then I expect that to last for several years instead of one winter.

    I laugh every time I picture your Golden knocking a thief down and attacking him with slobber-licks until pure joy overrides the meds and he goes into grand mal.
  17. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2008
    Messages:
    3,879
    Loc:
    Shelton, WA
    Does this mean you've ruled out a coal stove?
  18. HollowHill

    HollowHill Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2009
    Messages:
    667
    Loc:
    Central NY
    It's on the back burner, but not ruled out.

Share This Page