1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Advice on keeping my stacks clean and bug free

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Trilifter7, Jun 17, 2013.

  1. Huntindog1

    Huntindog1 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2011
    Messages:
    1,437
    Loc:
    South Central Indiana
    I would think what ever you spray your garden veggies with would be ok for firewood.

    As they are used on veggies as the break down very quickly.By time cold weather is here there will not be any traces left of it.

    Some bug sprays are derived from flowers.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    Diatomite is used as an insecticide, due to its abrasive and physico-sorptive properties.[8] The fine powder absorbs lipids from the waxy outer layer of insects' exoskeletons, causing them to dehydrate.[9] Arthropods die as a result of the water pressure deficiency, based on Fick's law of diffusion. This also works against gastropods and is commonly employed in gardening to defeat slugs. However, since slugs inhabit humid environments, efficacy is very low. It is sometimes mixed with an attractant or other additives to increase its effectiveness. Medical-grade diatomite is sometimes used to de-worm both animals and humans, with questionable efficacy.[10][11] It is commonly used in lieu of boric acid, and can be used to help control and possibly eliminate bed bug, house dust mite, cockroach and flea infestations.[citation needed][12] This material has wide application for insect control in grain storage.[13]
  3. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    It is a soft naturaly occuring rock, "Diatomaceous earth consists of fossilized remains of diatoms, a type of hard-shelled algae"
  4. Paulywalnut

    Paulywalnut Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Messages:
    2,065
    Loc:
    Kennett Square, PA
    Agreed. Birds don't like bug spray!!!
  5. Paulywalnut

    Paulywalnut Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Messages:
    2,065
    Loc:
    Kennett Square, PA
    The apple that I split recently was loaded with thousands of black ants. I stacked it in a sunny location
    and I really can't find one ant.
    TreePointer likes this.
  6. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Cherry are usually worse even than apple but both can be really loaded. I have one peach that I think the ants have invaded. It's my best peach tree too. Danged ants. Pick on the neighbor's trees and leave mine alone. Just like I tell the deer. Go over and eat the neighbor's beans. ;lol
    Trilifter7 likes this.
  7. mustash29

    mustash29 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2012
    Messages:
    341
    Loc:
    SE CT
    I split the stuff on the trailer today, about 2/3 - 3/4 cord. One large chunk had 3 nice big cracks in it. As soon as I rolled it around the ants started emerging, so I filled the crack with brake cleaner & used the extension "straw" to inject it. Then stopped for a drink break.

    When I split it open about 2 dozen critters scurried out, but another 1000 or so and a bunch of eggs were motionless. :cool:

    [​IMG]
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  8. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    I have the same situation from time to time, when splitting wood......and that's why I keep a propane torch right at my side. Termites, ants, earwigs, wood lice.....none of them are a match for the propane torch. I have a piezo-ignitor on it, and one click you are in business. Now, burning ant eggs and critters do stink a little for a couple seconds, but there's no poisonous insecticide needed.

    As for ants in your stacks, it's completely normal. The ants like to find places to put their 'birthing rooms' above ground in a semi-dry environment. I always find them in between the bark and split.....but by fall they are dormant or gone altogether, so I've never had a real issue with them. But if I find them, I torch 'em!::-)
  9. red oak

    red oak Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2011
    Messages:
    1,133
    Loc:
    northwest Virginia
    If any of you have chickens, you'll know what I'm talking about here. Mine come running when they hear me swing the maul. When the ants come pouring out it's like Thanksgiving for them!
    HDRock and Backwoods Savage like this.
  10. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    14,859
    Loc:
    Unity/Bangor, Maine
    Hmmm . . . they come every time they hear the maul . . . could be convenient when they stop laying and it's time for roast chicken . . . you won't have as hard a time catching them . . . unless of course these are pets.
    HDRock, Backwoods Savage and PapaDave like this.
  11. red oak

    red oak Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2011
    Messages:
    1,133
    Loc:
    northwest Virginia
    Well they are pets but I did have one that would jump right up on the chopping block!
    HDRock likes this.
  12. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Ours were pets too but they were still delicious.

    I've told the story here a few times about how I got the wild turkeys to clean up the ants. During winter so ants were dormant. Drew a line with birdseed from a place the turkeys crossed daily and that brought them right to the dead ants. They cleaned them up nicely. Then the problem was getting them to stop checking the wood pile daily for more ants...
    NortheastAl and HDRock like this.

Share This Page