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Air control lever

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by MaryAnn, Jan 18, 2006.

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  1. MaryAnn

    MaryAnn New Member

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    Nov 30, 2005
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    We are new to wood burning. I know all stoves are different. Our air control (draft control) goes from low, all the way in to high, all the way out. When we start fire we set it on high for about 15 minutes until it gets going good, then set it about halfway at 3. Lever reads from 1 to 6. We usually keep it at 3 during the day. At night we load the stove, get it going, then push air control all the way in for the slowest burn. Is it ok to have air control closed at night to get longer burn time? Its about 6 hours in between night and morning loading.

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  2. Willhound

    Willhound Feeling the Heat

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    Loc:
    Northern Ontario, Canada
    If it works for you, it's right.
    Draft control varies greatly by the stove, and even by the type and quality of wood, so if you've played with the settings and found something that works for your situation, then it's right. I should also add that most newer EPA non-catalytic stoves have the dampers set so that even when you have it "closed" all the way down, it is actually still open just slightly, so that it doesn't smolder as much. And yes, I think most of us do pretty much "close 'er down" for the night, unless you're an insomniac and get up periodically to put more wood in.
  3. Corie

    Corie Minister of Fire

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    I agree- The only RIGHT settings are the ones that work.

    However, when it comes time for a chimney inspection, just be certain you don't have massive amount of creosote deposists from running the stove at low settings. I'm not saying you will, but it isn't impossible.
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    This should not a problem with your stove. Check page 12 of the manual under "Extended Fire". First burn normally for about 30 minutes to thoroughly char the wood. Then it's ok to damper down for the night.

    How is the stove working for you? How is the blower - quiet or noisy? How is the heat output, as expected?
  5. MaryAnn

    MaryAnn New Member

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    Nov 30, 2005
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    The stove is working great. House is about 1650 sq feet, with a sunroom addition in back, 12 x 20, where the stove is located, about 75 degrees in this room. No heating ducts in this room. Didn't think I would use it year round. Room is insulated with thermopane windows. Was a very cold room. We've been using electric heater. Very expensive to run. Original part of house is 900 sq feet, which is heated with forced air gas furnace. This hasn't kicked on since we started burning. About 71 degrees in this area. Front addition has heated floors which is connected to a simple water heater, very inexpensive to run. We keep this set at 71 degrees. Furthest away from stove. So, actually you could say I have 3 different types of heating systems in this house. Just had a new high efficiency furnace installed two years ago. Main reason for wood stove was to heat sunroom, but its heating a lot more than that. We don't have a blower. Sunroom opens to kitchen to dining room, straight shot. We also left a double hung window in when sunroom was built, glad I did now. Ordered a reversible window fan for that to exhaust warm air into that room which is a den, which should radiate into hallway and 2 bedrooms. I'm hoping to save at least $125 a month on utilities in winter. Electric heater cost about $60 a month just to heat sunroom. I was worried about stove being too small (Napoleon 1100) to heat more than the sunroom. Its just right for heating this house. Couldn't go with 1400 because of truss locations. Didn't want any elbows in stovepipe.
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