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Air emissions, the impact of heating fuels

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by begreen, Jan 18, 2013.

  1. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    TradEddie likes this.

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  2. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    Fine particulates aren't great for older stoves, better for newer.
    Just shows there's another good reason for me to upgrade asap.:cool:
    Trilifter7 likes this.
  3. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Cool stuff. For those that don't want to read through it, skip down to the graphs. Interesting to say the least.
  4. brian89gp

    brian89gp Feeling the Heat

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    Kansas City
    Kind of ironic, the huge heat pump push from the environmental crowd actually would produce more greenhouse gas then burning wood.
  5. jharkin

    jharkin Minister of Fire

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    I wonder how much the % of installed EPA compliant stoves has increased since this was written ('98) and how much further the emissions picture for wood has improved.
    PapaDave likes this.
  6. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    Gotta push those electrons somehow. Regional power source differences will produce different results of course since somebody living in WA state gets way more power from hydroelectric dams than someone in coal country and the greenhouse gas emission differences will be drastic. The paper was global though.
  7. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Yep, I thought it interesting that they are looking at an "average".
  8. WoodpileOCD

    WoodpileOCD Minister of Fire

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    Central NC
    Here are the conclusions posted for those who don't like to read all the details. ;)

    CONCLUSIONS
    C When the contributions of all the components of energy production for residential space heating
    and the atmospheric fate of pollutants are taken into consideration, wood combustion has the
    lowest greenhouse gas and acid precipitation impacts per unit of heat delivered among the energy
    options. Its fine particulate impact based on existing wood burning appliances was the highest
    among the options.
    C The direct in-home use of natural gas has the lowest fine particulate impact per unit of heat
    delivered. While not as low as RWC, natural gas also has low greenhouse gas and acid
    precipitation impacts.
    C Average reductions in fine particulate values greater than 50% can be achieved with new wood
    burning appliances.
    C In regards to national or global scale air quality impacts, residential wood heating with new technology appliances and the direct use of natural gas are the most sound environmental options.
    PapaDave and milleo like this.

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