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American Chestnut

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Mrs. Krabappel, Nov 16, 2010.

  1. Mrs. Krabappel

    Mrs. Krabappel Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2010
    Messages:
    1,568
    Loc:
    Blue Ridge Mountains NC
    My house was built pre-blight. I have a lot of chestnut inside, and I have a bunch of rails from an old stacked split rail fence around one part of my property. There's not enough to re-build the fence, plus they look pretty beat. They are, however, still amazingly solid-not punky. Cut and burn? Would definitely be seasoned! It seems somehow sacriligious. I should try to rebuild a part of the fence, but it's such a low priority on my long list of things to do around the place.

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  2. chinkapin_oak

    chinkapin_oak Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2010
    Messages:
    102
    Loc:
    IN
    personally I would save them, or even try to sell them. American chestnut wood is hard to come by, and I would love to have a chunk of it just as a souvenir.
  3. andybaker

    andybaker Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    391
    Loc:
    Northwest OH
    The lastest I've heard is that there is a hybrid of a blight resistent American Chestnut. It would be nice to see this tree restored to it rightful place as the tree this place we call America was built upon.
  4. Mrs. Krabappel

    Mrs. Krabappel Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2010
    Messages:
    1,568
    Loc:
    Blue Ridge Mountains NC
    There's always some members of a species resistant to disease. It's such a shame that we went and cut *all* the trees down instead of waiting to let the resistant ones survive and create resistant
    offspring.
  5. scojen

    scojen New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2010
    Messages:
    71
    Loc:
    Southern Maryland
    yep it's true...unfortunately we won't see it restored in our lifetime. still it's good news!
  6. andybaker

    andybaker Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    391
    Loc:
    Northwest OH
    very true, but it's nice to know one day it'll be back. Kathleen, any news on the Hemlock down where you are about the woolly adelgid, any resistant stains found yet?
  7. pgmr

    pgmr Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2006
    Messages:
    396
    Loc:
    Central Indiana
  8. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2009
    Messages:
    4,040
    Loc:
    Central PA
    Penn State has plantations of trees that are something like 95% American Chestnut, with just enough European or chinese Chestnut DNA to resist the blight. I gather they grow pretty fast on a good site. i think if you have some land and are willing to follow their rules (keep the weeds down, etc.) you can get some seed or seedlings.
  9. Pine Knot

    Pine Knot Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2007
    Messages:
    149
    Loc:
    Southwest Virginia
    Here in my wood land the American Chestnut is still surviving after a fashion, at least the roots of some of the old trees still live. Sprouts from these roots sometimes grow to about the size of my wrist before the blight takes them. Then a blister forms on the bark and it all over. Then the roots send out another sprout and it grows for a few years. I have seen a few get large enough to produce a few nuts. I am now 74 years old but as a boy I remember seeing the woods full of the skeletons of the dead trees. They were a great loss to man and animals.
  10. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2009
    Messages:
    4,040
    Loc:
    Central PA
    I think a pile of chestnut fence rails may be one of those things that seems like it must be worth saving for something, but when you think about it, you can't figure out what. One of those woods you say "it is a shame to be burning this, but..." as you put it in the stove.

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