Amperage draw on insert blower?

paulgp602 Posted By paulgp602, Aug 25, 2006 at 12:01 AM

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  1. paulgp602

    paulgp602
    Member 2.
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    Jan 7, 2006
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    Hi all, does anyone know the amperage on a Regency I2400 insert's blower? I just wanted to know how much energy it uses. It doesn't seem like much. Probably alot less than my boiler's circulator and burner for sure! Thanks for any info.
     
  2. Retired_Ted

    Retired_Ted
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    Aug 21, 2006
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    Chambersburg PA USA
    Do you know the wattage? - divide the wattage by the voltage to get amperage. Most fans are pretty efficient - I'd bet it's less than an ampere once it's running.
     
  3. Rhone

    Rhone
    Minister of Fire 2.
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    Nov 21, 2005
    825
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    We had a discussion about this. Pacific Energy, my Clydesdale, I find most inserts blowers are drawing around 100 watts give or take, like having a 100 watt light bulb being on. Blowers use a lot of electricity IMHO. The VC Winter Warm Large uses muffin fans instead of blowers and if I remember correctly they only draw 40 watts to do the same.

    http://www.electricmotorwarehouse.com/fireplace.htm says a replacement blower for the Regency 2400 uses 0.92 amps. To convert that to watts, simply 0.92 amps * 120v house electricity) = around 110 watts. So, your blowers or a 110 watt light bulb draw the same electricity.

    To convert to kW divide the watts by 1000. 110 watts drawing from blower/1000 kW = blowers drawing 0.11 kW/hr. To figure out how much you're paying find out how much you pay per kWh. I'm paying $0.2290. So, multiply 0.11 kW * $0.2290 per kWh = $0.02519/hr to run. Run it for 12 hours/day, that's about $0.30 a day or 12 hours/day for 31 days = $9.37 a month.
     
  4. carpniels

    carpniels
    Minister of Fire 2.
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    Dec 6, 2005
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    Loc:
    Rome, NY, USA
    Hi Rhonemas,

    You pay 23 ct per kWh? Where do you live? Europe?

    I thought I paid a lot per kWh living in NY (tax capital of the USA), but I guess I am wrong.

    good luck and keep some candles handy.

    Carpniels
     
  5. Rhone

    Rhone
    Minister of Fire 2.
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    Nov 21, 2005
    825
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    My area has a sort of deal. Back in the day a power company started up in my city and got exclusive rights to sell power to inhabitants of my city and no other power company has the rights. It being local and all, helping the local economy, our city agreed all residents must get power from that company. It didn't do well with other cities or was it able to compete against other power suppliers to grow big so... our city is pretty much stuck with a little local power company. It reminds me of helping the local Mom & Pop shops and when it comes to service they're on it. But, expensive. At this point, I think they're more a middle-man and just buying the power from a bigger company and passing it on to us with upcharges whereas other people in other cities pretty much buy direct. It's always been one of the political items candidates bring up, to allow more than one choice for power so there's competition and lower rates but... it's been decades and nothing's changed.
     
  6. hilly

    hilly
    Feeling the Heat 2.
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    May 28, 2006
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    Loc:
    Vancouver Island, Canada
    This is great. The calculations you are doing are exactly the ones my grade 10 students have to do for their provincial science exam! I think I will use this example in class. Maybe they will use some of this stuff when they are older!
     
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