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Another one of those "what should I do questions"

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by beagler7694, Jul 18, 2008.

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  1. beagler7694

    beagler7694 New Member

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    I have been on this sight for over a month now and have learned a lot about wood stoves in that time. It is a great site for sure. Here is my dilema: I own a 1980's Defiance Company Penn Dutch wood stove that is in really good shape. Fire brick is good no overfiring signs on the steel. Used but clean. 8 in. flue, front loader, big fire box, no glass, UL listing is still on the back. I have no manual for the stove but the clearances are listed on the back. Ranch house on basement. I am putting this in my basement, stainless steal chimney, south side of my home. Looking for heat in basement and help out a bit upstairs. Knowing this is not a EPA certified stove what do you all think of this set up? Cost is a factor in this project but safety is the overall thing. I already own this stove. Should I look into a new one? I liked the looks of the Englander 30NCH at the Depot or the Napoleon 1400PL but like I said I already have this one. Any thoughts? :question:

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Can you post a picture of this puppy for posterity? Sounds like a stout stove. It should be ok to burn in. You'll probably burn more wood than in a new stove, but if you burn cleanly, it will put out heat. If this is built by Defiance of Calumet, MI, here's a wiki link for information on the stove.

    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/wiki/Defiance_Company/
  3. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    You're wasting your time putting a stove in your basement. I apologize for being abrupt but that's my experience from 3 friends that put a stove in their basements to warm their upstairs.
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    I agree that very often not a lot of heat gets upstairs from basement heaters. It depends on the design of the house, stove size and location and the location + size of the stairway opening. In this case, it sounds like the desire is primarily to heat the basement itself. If the intent is to heat a basement family or game room, it should do fine.
  5. PeteD

    PeteD New Member

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    The OP said they are looking for heat in the basement. This can be done. In the 80s, my parents had a smoke dragon in the (unfinished) basement.

    It would get to 80F down there no problem. The point about little of this heat making its way upstairs is correct, but you do feel some effect - warmer floors and a little heat makes it up the stairs (emphasis on little).

    Pete
  6. gpcollen1

    gpcollen1 Minister of Fire

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    Depending on what your cost for wood is, you may be fine and maybe not. If you pay for wood, you are wasting money in the old stove as it will eat much more wood than a new stove. If your wood is free, you will never recover the money - but you will still be doing more labor than necessary.

    I say hook it up if it puts out good heat and save some money to buy the stove before next year - or not.

    And nothing wrong with having a warm basement and warm floors upstairs...
  7. beagler7694

    beagler7694 New Member

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    I'll try and upload a picture later but I have dial up so it may be a while. The stove is mostly for a warm basement. I was just worried about creasote from an old "dirty" stove. I have 4 cords of ash and cherry dried and ready to burn this winter. I don't have too many neighbors and the ones I do have all burn outdoor boilers so I didn't think my wood stove would ruin the neighborhood.
  8. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

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    I like a stove to be in a room where it will be watched. This is most typically a family room with the honkin big plasma TV and couch(es).
    Watched for safety and watched for maintaining heat.

    I've had a stove in a bungalow basement and heated the basement and the floors and a bit upstairs.
    Walking up and down those stairs (burning dry pine) keeping that stove fed got lame quick, but I did it.
    I would find a way to get that stove upstairs if I were ever to end up back there again.

    My sister has a raised ranch with the big open stairway in the middle and a floor vent on each end and the wood stove in the (basement) has heated the whole house.
  9. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    If you have dry wood and don't choke down the stove early (making it smolder), you should be ok. Start the fire and let it burn hot until in the coal stage, then you can throttle it down. Check the flue, if there is smoke, give the fire some air. If no smoke showing, you are doing well.

    Are there a furnace, hw heater, clothes dryer, bath fan or other competing devices for the air supply in the basement? If so, you may find the stove balky starting and smoky when the door is opened. If that is a frequent case, then the stove or competing devices will need a fresh air supply. This would be easy on a new stove with an outside air kit, but no on an older model. Sometimes fresh air can be introduced to the furnace to alleviate the problem.
  10. beagler7694

    beagler7694 New Member

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    Nothing in the basement but the well tank. My installer mentioned an outdoor air kit.
  11. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Any possibility of getting a photo posted for the stove? Sounds like it may be a nice old one. I'd like to see it.
  12. beagler7694

    beagler7694 New Member

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    I'll have a pic up tonight. Looks a lot like the Master Choice Photo on the wiki page, maybe a little more basic.
  13. beagler7694

    beagler7694 New Member

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    Pictures as requested!!

    Attached Files:

  14. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    Wish I had a photos, but one of my cousins has an ollllldddd looks like from 40's something wood burning monster.
    He has it in his basement, and leaves the basement door open. I was there last X-mas, and holy moly, upstairs was over 80 and everyone was sweating LOL.
    Not saying all basements will be the perfect spot for a stove, but some do do very well. His place is a typical 2 story, not a very open floor plan. Guess hes a lucky one.

    My uncle has a coal burning octopus looking coal furnace in his basement, that thing heats even better than my cousins wood burner.
  15. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    I suggest looking that stove over reallll well. Inside & out, for cracks, warpage etc.
    Its obviously been repainted, and unless you look it over good, you will never be able to tell if it was over fired from the usual white markings. But cracks & warpage will tell a story.
  16. beagler7694

    beagler7694 New Member

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    The brother in law and me could not find a crack. Hate to admit it but the paint job was from me.
  17. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    HAHA, I saw that side photos, before you took it off ;)
    Alot of can strokes a lil too far from the surface, "dry sprayed".
    Before you painted it, did it have any white areas as in on the doors inner &/or outer, the top or side?
    Sure sign of ever firing. No warpage?
    If not, lookls like shes in good shape, but you will burn more wood in the older stove.
  18. beagler7694

    beagler7694 New Member

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    Hey! I put it back up. :red: I looked over before that expert paint job :roll: and could not see any white anywhere and its straight no warps no cracks. Of course I imagine firing it up might change that.
  19. beagler7694

    beagler7694 New Member

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    Had a silver F150 that wasn't painted as good as that stove!! :lol:
  20. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    That one musta been painted by brush ;)
  21. beagler7694

    beagler7694 New Member

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    :lol: :lol:
  22. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Thanks beagler. Nice stove, she looks good to go.
  23. gibson

    gibson New Member

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    I like it!
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