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Another outside air vent question.

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by skinnykid, Dec 4, 2008.

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  1. skinnykid

    skinnykid New Member

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    I cannot run my stove right now while we wait for the chimney guy to come over and give it a clean out.

    So, me and the G/F spoke about getting a new stove for the 2009 burning season. (we need a bigger fire box)
    We already know that we will be going with welded pipe from the stove to the wall, and we spoke about an outside air kit.

    My question is, do they REALLY make a difference, I know it will NOT pull air from inside the house but is it noticeable?
    Also, when the stove is not running/ running slowly,can you feel a draft from the outside air kit.
    I would assume that the fit from the air kit to the stove is NOT air tight and air must leak out no matter what.

    Thanks for any input that you can give.

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  2. karri0n

    karri0n New Member

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  3. Nic36

    Nic36 Feeling the Heat

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    I hooked my stove to an OAK from the start. You are right, the fit is not airtight and the stove can pull air from elsewhere. But, I have been outside two times while running the stove and have placed my hand up to the air vent. I can definitely feel air being pulled into the vent. After all, it is going to take the path of least resistance. The good thing is I don't have to feel that cold air the stove would have to get from somewhere else without an OAK.
  4. skinnykid

    skinnykid New Member

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    So with the stove not running, wouldn't the OAK allow cold air into your home, causing it to be chilly or drafty?
  5. oconnor

    oconnor Minister of Fire

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    Nope, the OAK will cause the air to be drawn up your flue, or more correctly, it will stop you flue from sucking the air out of your house. Even when cold, the flue is going to either suck air out of the house, or become the entry point for air being sucked out somewhere else (clothes dryer, attic hatch in a two storey house). The OAK will help prevent that.

    As for the fit, it's a solid fit on my insert.
  6. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    The outside air connection and ducting on my hearthstone stove is 100% air tight. There is no air leaking into or out of it to the room. The ducting runs air year round since it has a draft just like a chimney. There is no actual reason to not have an outside air connection and there are plenty of reasons to have a connection. Heck, they are required in my state for all installations.
  7. oconnor

    oconnor Minister of Fire

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    I must confess that I am now to be counted among the converted to the OAK. A search of earlier threads on here would make some think otherwise. Haven't got one yet, but want one.
  8. Hanko

    Hanko Minister of Fire

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    My shop and office is so tight, one window and dense pack spray foam insulation. I have no choice but to run an OAS. The stove will pull a negative inside. If you have a leaky house no need for one
  9. oconnor

    oconnor Minister of Fire

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    If you have a leaky house you might not need one, or you may need one more - all depends on stack effect. A leaky upstairs with a tight basement on a basement install, and you could easily have pressure related problems.
  10. skinnykid

    skinnykid New Member

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    my house is very well insulated and pretty tight for the most part. It is only 10 years old.
  11. Chief Ryan

    Chief Ryan New Member

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    I've been running my Fireview from the start with an OAK and i think it runs great. You'll get no influence from any indoor appliances (kitchen hood, dryer,bathroom fan ETC). Why pull heated air out of the house??
  12. Stephen in SoKY

    Stephen in SoKY Feeling the Heat

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    Must the OAK be sealed completely to the intake? Would a flexible duct to a sheet metal box around the intake be sufficient?
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