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Another PH shoulder season fire...

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by rideau, Sep 25, 2012.

  1. Waulie

    Waulie Minister of Fire

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    Of course, your low burn would consist of about 100,000 btus or so. :eek:

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  2. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    Well, yeah, I would have three low burns going. It would add up I suppose. :)
  3. rdust

    rdust Minister of Fire

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    I'll be able to use the low type burns for October, November, April and March. Last season I tried to burn my softer hardwoods(silver maple, cherry, black walnut) during the warm weather and was getting 18 hour burn times with highs in the low 40's. I really don't have much shoulder wood this season so I'll probably get to see how it burns with highs in the low 40's with oak and ash.
  4. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

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    I actually just this afternoon measured from the east wall of the firebox to the door (which means slightly beyond the firebox): 24 inches. So, angled and not too big 24 inches, but 22 is really the max for reasonable loading.

    You can get a 10 x 12 inch log in I think. But the firebox isn't deep and the door isn't high, so if you have a log that big in there, it might be hard to get a full load in the firebox.
  5. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

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    Let us hear from you once you've been burning for a while. You may be surprised...get a lot more heat from the PH with the same amount of wood. I didn't use more wood switching from Fireview to PH.
  6. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

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    People keep saying that there are only so many BTUs in a piece of wood, and that therefore firebox size determines heat output, because heat output will be directly realted to amount of wood loaded. .

    The two don't follow -- it just isn't so. If I burn exactly the same amount of and species of wood in my PH as in my Fireview, I get very significantly more heat out of the PH...it is simply more efficient and, I surmise, loses less heat up the chimney. It has a much bigger window and a slanted back, which forces more heat to be radiated out the front very quickly.
  7. rdust

    rdust Minister of Fire

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    No where did I say every stove with the same size firebox will produce exactly the same heat. I said stoves with similar sized fireboxes will perform *similar* to each other. Post by users here can confirm this time and time again. Some stoves are obviously more efficient in transferring/releasing heat back into the room. In the real world I feel a stove rated at 75% vs 80% isn't going to mean squat.
  8. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

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    I believe the Fireview is rated 72 or 73, the PH 80 or 81 ...there is a big difference in efficiency in the real word, and in theory 72 to 80 is over a 10 % increase in efficiency.
  9. Waulie

    Waulie Minister of Fire

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    I get highs in the 40s into early November and in March. I could definitely get 14+ hour burn times if I wanted, but you didn't answer one of my questions. This is important. How/when do you load your stove if you're running an 18 hour burn cycle? Don't you work and sleep? I mean, really, you're talking about putting wood in the stove twice a day regardless, aren't you?
  10. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    I'll touch on this. I work from home. My need is based on comfort. I found that I hate waking up and having to load the stove first thing in the morning with a house that is less warm than I desire. If you have the option for 18+ hour burns, I like to know that I can either go to bed without cramming the stove full one last time or I can wake up and not have to think about loading a stove.

    It's the flexibility of the day to day cycles that I crave.
  11. Waulie

    Waulie Minister of Fire

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    That's cool, but you probably represent 0.3% of wood burners. Most people do not work at home. People with normal schedules would find an 18 hour burn cycle to be basically impossible. If you're going to put wood in the stove more than once a day, it's much easier to do when you're actually home and awake. ;)

    Edit: What you crave and what some other very vocal folks on here seem to think is the most important thing with a wood stove simply does not match how the vast majority of users will use their stove. I absolutely could not manage an 18 hour burn cycle and can't imagine how anyone with a nornal schedule could. So, maybe burning forever at a really low output just doesn't work for me, and probably wouldn't work for most people. Maybe, just maybe, this is not realistically the most important thing to most burners. Something to consider...
  12. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    I am speaking personally and how I like to operate a stove. And I think you are taking the mention of an 18 hour burn cycle too literal. Whether you are talking about 12, 16, 18, 24, or 30+ hour burns, it is an option, not something that needs to be stuck to. If you are stuck at work, or you have to pick up the kids, or you have a dinner to go to after a long day, it is nice to know that the house will be warm when you return and that your personal schedule is not ruled be when the stove stops producing heat.

    Also, as the winter drags on, you really get tired of loading the wood burning beasts. The longer the burn, the more you get to enjoy the heat and the stove without fiddling with wood or the stove.

    There are many on here that are looking for consistent 12+ hour burns. Whether it is a low burn or a high burn. At this point it appears that the Progress will provide this on a regular basis. Which is nice.

    But, I do think you are underestimating the flexibility that a low burn provides during many portions of the burning months and the market that looks for this. Being in the SE PA area, the length of shoulder season can vary greatly. Usually our fist taste of legitimate cold is in mid-to late December and a lasting snow storm usually doesn't happen until January. Which means the majority of the cold months the highs are 35-42 degrees with overnight lows in the low 20s to low 30s.
    rdust likes this.
  13. rdust

    rdust Minister of Fire

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    You're 100% correct an 18 hour schedule for loading the stove doesn't fit the day to day well. I find the weekends are the times where I really try to stretch out the burn times since I'm around the house. When I can't get 22-24 hours between loads anymore I try to load in 12 hour stretches since it fits my life better. That doesn't mean it isn't nice to have the extra capacity when it's needed/wanted. On the days where I have to leave early for work or come home late it's nice to know the first thing I'm not doing when I come in the door is loading the stove.
  14. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

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    I agree with you Waulie, no sense in this weather to waste wood by filling up the fire box. A short hot fire is all that's needed to stay comfy right now. I don't have a lot of experience with my BK yet but so far it seems very controllable and I have many different options on how it's going to heat the house. Most likely I'll just keep her burning low and slow all year to keep my finished 1000 sq ft basement warm and burn my Woodstock on the main floor as needed. If I didn't have the WS I'm sure I'd be filling the BK stove just like any other similar sized stove out there to keep up in the dead of Winter.
  15. Slow1

    Slow1 Minister of Fire

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    Don't worry - I'm not one to keep too quiet :) Although it is hard to really normalize for everything, I do have my data collected for the last three years of the FV (daily records of number of splits vs HDD) so it will be interesting. I didn't keep interior temps beyond the first year though.

    I'm not going to be upset either way if I have to burn a bit more wood as I'm pretty happy with the burn rate and if I have to burn more wood to get more heat who am I to complain? However, I will be rather disappointed if I can't achieve a 12hr burn cycle for the vast majority of the heating season as this is important to me. Our schedule seems to be getting more challenging each year as the kids are growing and having to plan around stove loads just won't work for us very well. We really enjoy the stove and wood heat - everyone looks forward to it each fall and is disappointed in the spring when we stop so we look at it as a pleasure of the season, but as the head of the stove loading guild I'm looking to minimize the schedule hassle.
  16. Waulie

    Waulie Minister of Fire

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    I really think you have the perfect setup for the BK. As you said, you can probably enjoy really long burn times pretty much all winter with that stove since you have the Keystone to supplement as needed. That is sweet!
  17. Waulie

    Waulie Minister of Fire

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    I don't think you'll have problems with 12 hour cycles unless you live in a huge drafty barn.
    rideau likes this.
  18. fire_man

    fire_man Minister of Fire

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    Todd: I'm surprised you haven't already started tinkering with the BK air supply to extend those measily 24 hour burn times!
  19. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    Well, he already got at least one 33 hour burn out of the Princess. I think Todd will have a hard time finding ways to tinker with that stove that will improve upon a 33 hour burn. ;lol
  20. fire_man

    fire_man Minister of Fire

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    That's kind of what I was thinking by "massive" - 8 to 9 inchers measured at the bark edges.
  21. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

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    There will be no tinkering with this stove. It does everything I want it to.
  22. fire_man

    fire_man Minister of Fire

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    OK - who kidnapped the REAL Todd?! ;lol;lol
  23. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

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    I've been using my overnight fires to cook my winter squashes and pumpkins, so I can puree and freeze them. My smaller cast aluminum roasting pan fits perfectly on the central element, if put on a slight slant. Put two butternut squash in, cover and leave. End of burn, squash is soft, easy to remove seeds and scrape out squash.
    Cooked scrambled eggs with summer squash, sunnyside up eggs, and oatmeal cereal this morning.
    It's an overcast moist day, so I'm keeping a small fire going, burning my maple bark. Will probably make a chicken casserole or turkey casserole and cook it on the stove tonight....
    Steamed broccoli [for freezing] on the stove last evening, prior to putting the squash on....
    The stove has three elements and I have, at times, used all three elements. The three elements are three different temperatures, and the closed soapstone top is yet another temp, add a piece of soapstone above the top and you have a fifth temperature. You can really cook anything, including things you normally have to do in a double boiler (simply put those on the two layers of soapstone).

    I'll probably start a thread about cooking on this stove, and encourage members to post recipes...

    On a less nice note, had a tick attached to me this afternoon...first since the late spring. Hardly have been in the woods...just the very edge, sweats on tight at the ankle...tick attached to chest. Ugh. Time to cut the dog's fur again....A wash and a spin and there is a nice warm hat and mittens....
  24. Waulie

    Waulie Minister of Fire

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    Please do, rideau. I haven't cook on mine yet as I have only had night fires, but I'm excited and would love some tips/recipes.
  25. fire_man

    fire_man Minister of Fire

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