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Any input re: a Camry V6? What'd I break?

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by bluedogz, Jan 13, 2013.

  1. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    Toyota ain't the only morons to try it.

    GM. 1st gen Cadillac NorthStar V8's

    [​IMG]

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  2. TMonter

    TMonter Minister of Fire

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    I wouldn't say it's all the V6's. Some of the ones a couple generations ago has some sludge problems from the oil passages being too small but I know several people with V6 trucks and Camry's here in the PNW that have 200k+ on their V6's that would disagree with that assessment. A lot of it has to do with how the vehicle is treated and maintained.

    I agree that putting the starter under the intake runners is a bonehead move however.

    Their 1.6, 1.8 and 2.4 liter 4 cylinders are rock solid long lived engines although the 1.6 has some exhaust manifold issues and some oil consumption issues past 160k miles.
  3. bluedogz

    bluedogz Minister of Fire

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    I just rolled over 230k miles, and my only roadside moments have been due to a flat tire and to leaving the aforementioned hose clamp loose- operator error there.
  4. Bret Chase

    Bret Chase Minister of Fire

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    those weren't exactly some of GM's best work either....
  5. TMonter

    TMonter Minister of Fire

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    The Northstar V8 was a very good engine actually, just had a poorly located starter.
  6. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    And an appetite for oil.

    For some, an engine is a POS if it doesn't go 400,000 miles without a single failure (including sensors and accessories), burn zero oil, and get 40 MPG.
    nate379 likes this.
  7. TMonter

    TMonter Minister of Fire

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    I don't know of any gas engine that does that. The longest lived engine I've ever owned was on a 240 series volvo with solenoid fuel injection and at 543,000 miles it was using about a quart every 1000 miles.
  8. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    That's the point. Some people are just never happy. They have a minor issue with a vehicle and then start putting it down and bashing the whole brand. Then they buy another brand and repeat the process as often as their checkbook/credit will allow.

    I own a vehicle with a so-called "problem engine". My 2005 GMC Canyon with the 3.5L inline five cyl has over 112K on it, and I have a heavy right foot, the truck is usually loaded to capacity unless I'm driving to/from work, and I've done nothing to that engine other then clean the throttle body every 50k, re-weld an exhaust heatshield (at 50k) and change the sprak plugs (at 110K >>). Ok OK OK, I changed the oil (never more than every 5K, currently out to 10K intervals after switching oils.Steady diet of high-quality synthetics.) and flushed the cooling system last week. This engine is known for cylinder sleeve issues, intake valve seat wear issues, and just plain being problematic. But I think my truck is case in point, maitenance matters. Here's hoping it holds together another 2 years.

    My co-worker owns a Chevy Colorado with the 2.8L four cyl, a close cousin to my 3.5L. (Modular engine design) He received the letter from GM about the intake valve seat issue and declared he either wanted a new engine (nothing wrong with his......) or he would never buy another Chevrolet. :rolleyes:
  9. basod

    basod Minister of Fire

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    Yes Northstars drink oil, the fix WOT's in 2nd to 75. Eventually this will cause the engine mounts to fail
    The starter isn't a hard fix on one, I've had the intake off mine twice once for the intake boot crack and second for the mouse who chewed through the knock sensor wire.
    Now when it comes time for new head gaskets and dropping the engine and timeserting the STS may retire.

    FYI anyone that gets lean bank codes check for downstream MAF leak before O2 sensors.
  10. jharkin

    jharkin Minister of Fire

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    My wifes old corolla got that bank lean code a lot. Before she met me mechanics tried to sell her all kinds of fixes. The issue is the MAF would get crudded up, I'd clean the wire with electronic cleaning spray once a year all set.

    its funny what is a big issue to some. I had an 87 dodge charge with the iron block slant 4. Bought the car for 200 bucks, 250k and still going. We once had a Honda civic though that needed a valve job at 90k and blew the head at 180. But still I trust Hondas more and have had many many since.

    Case in point I know many don't trust Honda automatics since the rash of failures 10 years ago. But they have been redesigned since and I have no worry about the unit in our 08 pilot. Just changed out the Honda atf for redline synthetic and forget about it.
  11. TMonter

    TMonter Minister of Fire

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    The Automatic transmission issues on Hondas was primarily on the 99' to 02' models but does extend a bit into the 03' and 04' models. The key to getting long life out of those particular transmissions is frequently changing the fluid and moving away from the Honda ATF to a high quality Synthetic. Installing a filter on the 02' and earlier transmissions can also help. A couple transmission re-builders have also come up with a couple minor modifications internally on a rebuild that seems to lengthen the life of that particular transmission by a big margin.

    I have a few pictures from the rebuild on our van somewhere showing the fiber material completely worn of the second clutch pack for a 2001 Honda Odyssey.

    What it boils down to is Honda didn't upgrade the transmission before stuffing it in the V6 accord and Odyssey and the power from the engine was more than the transmission could handle. The heat from this would cause softening of the clutch pack when the fluid degraded and cause premature failures.

    What year was your Wife's Corolla that had the MAF sensor issue?
  12. jharkin

    jharkin Minister of Fire

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    Her Corolla was an 01.

    I know that Honda themselves replaced the z1 fluid with a new synthetic formulation called dw1. But I'll still trust redline better. Redline MTL cured the sticky 2-3 synchro in my acura.
  13. TMonter

    TMonter Minister of Fire

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    Sort of odd that the 01 had that problem but the 1995 era did not. I've been using the Amsoil full synthetic ATF in our Honda with good results.
  14. jharkin

    jharkin Minister of Fire

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    Did the 95 have a maf or a map sensor? I don't know Toyotas that well...
  15. TMonter

    TMonter Minister of Fire

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    I've since sold the car and bought another one so I couldn't tell you but I think it had a MAF sensor and I never had any issues. Mine did have the 1.6L instead of the more common 1.8L engine.
  16. Bret Chase

    Bret Chase Minister of Fire

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    I put 450,000+ miles on a 1988 Chevy extended cab long bed C1500 with a lowly 305 in it..... the last engine work was done at 70k.... it was "put to pasture" after it wore out it's second rear-end... The next 88 chevy I had was a K2500... and I went through 3 transmissions in 5k miles...

    All I said is the first gen Norstar wasn't GM's best work... I never said it was an awful engine... but for a "high feature V8" it can't keep up with a pushrod LS motor...
  17. bluedogz

    bluedogz Minister of Fire

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    Had to hunt around but I found the right parts guy...

    2 dealers, no dice... both said my only option was a new engine harness at $1699. Riiiiiight.

    Advance Auto Parts: I pulled in asking for pins and/or heat-shrink tubing so I could try to cobble it back together. Counter guys says, "Yeah, a VVT sensor plug? I have it with pigtails on it... and heat-shrink is in aisle 3." $59.99 later, and I am good to go.
  18. heat seeker

    heat seeker Minister of Fire

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    Gotta love it when a plan comes together! A good parts guy is worth his weight in gold!
  19. bluedogz

    bluedogz Minister of Fire

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    I flashed back to my days working a parts counter over 20 years ago... maybe it's a matter of mindset, but I always hated the "microfiche doesn't show it- I can't order it" attitude. To my mind, a good parts guy focuses on getting the vehicle back on the road, and knows his **** to get there.
  20. aussiedog3

    aussiedog3 Feeling the Heat

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    I beg to differ with you. Get yourself a 1993-94 era V-6. Wife has one and it's the best engine/vehicle combo I've ever owned, so far nothing but routine maintenance, just over 180,000 miles this past weekend. Kind of like the GM 3100 V-6 engines from the same era, I've seen many of them go well over 300,000 miles, and still going strong.
    basod likes this.

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