Any tips on humidity?

tsojess Posted By tsojess, Feb 12, 2011 at 5:39 AM

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  1. tsojess

    tsojess
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    Jan 15, 2011
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    For the first time ever, the problem isn't getting rid of it, but adding some. We have hot water heat so we don't get the drying effect of forced air, and we've always had problems with being too damp and even mold on the walls.

    Now since adding the Hearthstone wood stove, we're drying out too much, often down to 16%. I've got one of those cast iron "tea pots" on the stove and that uses about 3/4 of it's water in a day, but it's still dry. I'm debating on getting one of the hearthstone steamers since they match the stove and have a lot more openings in the top (although, most of the time, I'm leaving the lid of the tea kettle open most of the way) or getting an evaporative humidifier (electric).

    Anyone have any suggestions, I'm pretty much a newbie to wood burning (12/30/2010, to be exact) and, with this house, the whole concept of low humidity is new.
     
  2. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak
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    Oct 17, 2008
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    Your probably drawing a lot of dry winter air into the house with your woodstove so a fresh air intake if your stove can utilize one may help.
    I have the same problem in winter. I used to run a humidifier but i keep wondering if all that water is condensing inside my walls somewhere.
    Also most of the standard humidifiers are like a part time job keeping them filled ,plus the kind with the paper absorption filters get moldy pretty fast. Im trying to just live with it but its not pleasant.
    Before i go back to the filter type humidifier i might try one of those whole house units that hook right up to your waterline with the plastic discs in them.Way Less maintainance.
     
  3. heatwise

    heatwise
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    Sep 13, 2009
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    thats low. we have ours just below normal, on this dial its showing 47%. i tend to shower without using an exhaust fan with the door slightly open to keep that moist air in . and we hang our towels over a hand rail at the stairway. if i wipe out the moisture from the tub it gets the towel heavier but i figure its going to get back to the air just the same if left in the tub to dry. if it gets too dry i wet a large dish towel and hang it on the oven door handle in the kitchen. we also final dry clothes on a line in the basement. years ago i bought a plaster's tray that we filled with water and placed it on the front edge of the buck stove. it was about 4'' x 18'' and a few inches deep, looked like stainless but might have been polished metal. that worked well as i recall. enjoy the stove and i hope you can raise your humidity without creating an extra chore. pete
     
  4. soupy1957

    soupy1957
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    Jan 8, 2010
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    Start with a humidifier if you want........just to see what difference it makes.

    After that.....dunno........

    On our forced hot air system (which I realize you DON'T have) we had a humidifier that was built into the system.......

    -Soupy1957
     
  5. Dave_1

    Dave_1
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    Jul 19, 2006
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  6. Burner73

    Burner73
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    Jul 22, 2008
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    Gota Venta for my daughters room.


    Works well and does not overhumify.

    Pros: no extra humididty since it is evaportative, no real cleaning issues
    Cons: can cool air since not heated, VERY $'s
     
  7. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak
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    Oct 17, 2008
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    As far as tips go ,i pull the dryer vent in winter and plug up the flapper pipe. Then use the old pantyhose method to catch any lint and vent the dryer right into the house. Throws a lot of heat as well as moisture. I Have a few large aquariums as well, 125 GAL they help a little. Still i run about 25% in winter. Drier than a desert.
     
  8. Jimbob

    Jimbob
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    Oct 12, 2007
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    An outside air kit for the stove will definitely bring the humidity back up.
    Also check all your weatherstripping.
    If any of you take a shower when nobody else is home, do so with the bathroom door wide open. This will keep the bathroom from getting too steamy, and add humidity to the house.
     
  9. DonNC

    DonNC
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    Jan 3, 2011
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    Sounds like your a prime candidate to try battenkilns experiment of drying wet wood indoors. In that thread everyone said it will add too much humidity to your house :cheese:

    A couple of things you can do is not use the bathroom vent when showering. Let that humidity stay in the house.
    Same thing if you boil water on the stove. Dont use the vent.
    Is your clothes dryer in the house? .. hmmm... There is alot of wasted humidity going outdoors with that. But alot of dust too.
     
  10. DBoon

    DBoon
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    Jan 14, 2009
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    My wife and I dry all of our clothes indoors in the wintertime on an indoor drying rack in the wood stove room. It helps quite a bit.
     
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