Anyone have this splitter?

basswidow Posted By basswidow, Mar 30, 2009 at 7:42 PM

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  1. Gooserider

    Gooserider
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    I think the big advantage of having your own splitter is not having to rush in order to get the job done before the meter runs up a big bill... A splitter is far safer than a chainsaw, but we have still had a fair number of reported injuries where people have tried to split their fingers (Not a good idea, fingers don't burn well...) Almost always because they were rushing with the rental splitter, and got tired and careless... When it's your machine, you can stop when you get tired, no need to push the limits in order to get the production out.

    Size wise, I think a 20 ton is about right, and I definitely fall in the go vertical camp. I don't see that much need for a multi-way wedge, it seems to me like it's a little less safe, and makes it harder to get just the size split you want. I often will take and split a log once or twice in one direction, and then hold the peices together while turning them 90* and making another 2-3 splits - this gives more splits with fewer strokes. I also try to "short cycle" the ram - take it down just far enough to make the split, then back up just far enough to make room for the next round - big time savings when you are using a 4-5" cycle instead of a 24" cycle. I may actually try to adjust my valve to turn the auto-return off, as I find that I'm happier controlling it by hand anyway.

    Another thing that I did on my splitter was to mark the beam for length - primarily by drilling with a large drill just enough to cut a "dimple" every two inches - staggering them on alternate sides of the web. I also stamped the measurments with a numbering set I had, but that was just being fancy... However it gives me a reference as to how far to cycle the wedge back up, and also gives me a "QA" check on the length so I can filter out the rounds that are over length. (This is the sort of thing you can do with your own machine, but not with a rental...)

    Gooserider
     
  2. burningbill

    burningbill
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    I can attest to the working too fast with a rental. I was doing just that and didn't notice the tip of my pinky between the wood and the stop plate, I was watching the wedge. $750 in stitches later (which thankfully was covered by insurance) I figured I would just go ahead and buy a splitter. I love owning because I split when I want for as long as I want. The machine has intrinsic value which I can recoup in the future if I ever get rid of this wood burning addiction. Also I am always alarmed by the fine print on a rental agreement. If something does break and I didn't buy the insurance at an additional cost I am liable?
    I made my own four way wedge because I could not find one from a manufacturer that was any good. I made sure the horizontal plane would only split in the up direction so I could avoid a jam between it and the beam as was mentioned in an earlier post. I don't think it is any more dangerous to operate with a four way and it is a slip on so if I need a different size or want a 2 way split I can pop off the 4 way wedge with the smack of a hammer. In 8"-16" wood it will cut splitting time to less than half of a two way wedge.
     
  3. Jags

    Jags
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    Excellent idea Goose, thanks for the tip.
     
  4. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage
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    My feelings on a splitter that splits 4 ways is that it would be fine if all your logs were the same size. However, I've never used one so can't say for 100% sure.

    On those that you split into 4 pieces, you can do that with two strokes of the ram. I had several of those yesterday. Split down the middle, raise ram and turn the whole block (that is, both pieces you just split), turn them and split again and you magically have 4 splits with only 2 stokes.

    I keep wondering how those 4 way splitters would work when you are splitting a 30" diameter log. Same goes for a 6" diameter.
     
  5. Jay H

    Jay H
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    But why would you have to split your fingers? My fingers are well shorter than 18" so I just toss them in the stove willy nilly!

    ;)

    Jay
     
  6. crazy_dan

    crazy_dan
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    A hole drilled on each side of the ram and a piece of 3/8" thick flat stock bolted across the beam at right length for your stove will act as a stop for your ram plus will wee out and that are too long. that way you can put it in auto return and have the use of both hands. If your in to that sort of thing. Easily removable as well.
     
  7. Brian VT

    Brian VT
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    Good one !
     
  8. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa
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    I was thinking of putting a limiter on the retract so that auto-return doesn't take it all the way back. I was thinking of putting a removable Cat grade bolt behind the wedge but being cautious as to how much hydraulic pressure is exerted before auto-return kicks out, I stuck a fair sized round behind the wedge as a test and it just mashed it. I saw one of Goose's posts where he tried using a bolt (unknown grade) and he said it mangled the bolt.

    I wouldn't mind seeing a pic of this mod and am curious what model splitter it was performed on.
     
  9. kevin j

    kevin j
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    split stop collars on the rod. From a farm supply store.
    and back down on the kickout pressure of the detent. so it kicks out at lower pressure. Should be an adjuster on the back of the spool 90 degrees to the spool axis.
     
  10. Gooserider

    Gooserider
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    As LL mentioned, I posted a while back about an effort to do a limit stop by drilling some paired holes in the log ejector and putting a 1/2" steel bolt through the hole - I presume the bolt was grade 5, as I believe that is what the generic hardware store bolts are, but at any rate it turned the bolt into a pretzel, without even slowing down...

    I also prefer to split the over length peices while I have them in my hand, then toss them in a seperate pile - it seems to me like it cuts down on handling to only take them to the splitter once. This means that any stop I used would need to be a fast, no tools thing to put on and off. My bolt would have done that if it had worked, but I'm not sure about some of the other suggestions.

    However they are good ideas, just not sure they'd work for my work pattern.

    Gooserider
     
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