Aquaponics - 21st Century Agriculture

Marvin Posted By Marvin, Aug 28, 2013 at 7:38 PM

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  1. Marvin

    Marvin
    New Member

    Aug 28, 2013
    1
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    Loc:
    Southern California
    For over four months, I researched aquaponics for my daughter. This form of gardening eliminates weeds, dirt, stooping, and bending, and lets nature do the work in a symbiotic relationship with fish, plants, and bacteria.

    Anyone interested may receive a 22 page document with thousands of YouTube and text references, plus a PowerPoint slide presentation free of charge with notes and references. Learn from the experience of others from around the world. After several years of learning, it is easy to add modules to start commercial production of vegetables and fish. BUT START SMALL!

    Consider this a "pay forward" contribution for better flavordd vegetables and a method for survival if you fear the future. For everyone else, it is an efficient method to feed your family with little space.

    Marvin
    mah92019@yahoo.com
     
  2. begreen

    begreen
    Mooderator
    Staff Member

    Nov 18, 2005
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    Had a neighbor that had quite a carp farm setup to feed his plants. I loved going down into his greenhouses in the winter and see tomatoes on the plants and fish swimming around. Fish poop is good fertilizer.
     
  3. StuckInTheMuck

    Dec 6, 2011
    169
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    Loc:
    沖縄日本
    Marvin, Welcome to the forum. Can you just go ahead and post the document on the site? If you save to a .pdf, it shouldn't be too big.. Thanks.
     
  4. Mr A

    Mr A
    Minister of Fire

    Nov 18, 2011
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    Loc:
    N. California
    http://portablefarms.com/ Seems like a good idea, I don't see it as more than a hobby. Looks expensive to get started. Says you get 8 oz of fish every two weeks with one module. With enough modules, $2500 each, you get 400 pounds of fish annually. I could probably just go catch more than that with a $10 fishing license, a soda bottle and some string. It takes 9 months to grow a 3 pound tilapia.
     
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