ash container

Post in 'The Gear' started by grunde, Sep 26, 2010.

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  1. grunde

    grunde
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    Hello,

    I am a newbie to using a wood burning furnace and have a longwood Mark VII in the house I purchased and moved into 3 months ago.
    I've been looking all over town and the internet without much luck for some type of deep metal pan to hold the ashes removed from the furnace.
    With the longwood furnace there is no ash pan to pull out, but it appears you have to rake them out into some type of container.

    My question is what do you use to rake the ashes into?

    I've found a few "ash cans" which would work to store ashes but you have to shovel them into that.
    It would be difficult raking the ashes onto the basement floor and scooping them with a shovel.
     

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  2. nate379

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    Metal bucket. They sell them at the hardware store, around $10 I believe. Also if you know anyone that does concrete or roofing, the stuff they use often comes in metal 5 gal pails.

    I'm not familar with your stove, but I have always found it works better to leave the ashes in the stove until it gets full. Then empty it out. Depending on the size of that stove and how you burn it might be once a month or every 2-3 months.
     
  3. begreen

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    I like a basic 10 gallon, metal garbage can.
     

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  4. semipro

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    We use two cans like these in rotation. I want those ashes to sit for a while in that can before I empty them outside. Its amazing how long embers can stay alive in an ash can. A fireman friend of mine tells me that many of the brush fires that see in winter result from someone dumping their stove ashes too soon.
     
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  5. catjax7071

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    I use and old metal 10 quart canning pot with a lid, I scoop my ashes out with an old heavy duty ash pan I found on ebay,works good for me,
     
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  6. nate379

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    Yes. Many years ago I was cleaning my folks stove (when I lived there).

    My Dad had 3 or 4 5 gal pails and I had filled all those up. (big stove) Well the ashes seemed cool, so I used a plastic pail for the remainder. I didn't even have time to finish before the bottom melted out of the pail!

     
  7. keydiver

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    Like this as well. I know how long the ashes have been in there before putting them on the curb.

    How ever. Once the disposal guys picks it up and dump it is the disposals companies responsability for what ever happens afterwards!
     
  8. Backwoods Savage

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    Ash holder


    These things work like a charm. It has a hinged lid for keeping in the dust and also is built on legs so you won't worry about sitting it down on something. We empty the ashes into that and then let it sit out in the carport for a few days before dumping the ashes into a large container which we later tote to the vegetable garden to spread the ashes. Those ashes are called a poor-man's lime. Just be sure to spread them thinly.
     
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  9. firefighterjake

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    Well I'm not the fireman friend you mentioned . . . although we can be friends if you want Semipro . . . ;) . . . but for the record your firefighter friend is spot on . . . I've seen a number of fires caused by the improper disposal of woodstove ashes . . . both dumping them outside too soon and from folks placing the "cold" ash and coals into plastic buckets, plastic bags, cardboard boxes, etc. and then placing these on the porch, wooden deck, garage, etc.
     
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  10. firefighterjake

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    For the record . . . and to address the OP . . . while I usually dump my ash pan (I like the ash pan with the Oslo) into a 5-10 gallon covered metal pail (that sits on a cement pad outside of my house) . . . and then dump the pail after it sits for several days-weeks . . . I have used the shovel in the past to scoop up the ashes and deposit them into the pail directly on the rare occasion . . . a decent coal-style shovel (with some sides) works better than some of those cheap, small, square and flat woodstove shovels that you frequently see in use.
     
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  11. semipro

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    Friends eh? Well we do love the same stoves. ;)

    We live in a cedar-sided, asphalt shingle topped house surrounded by cedar and pine trees, near the national forest. Fire is something we really respect. I scared myself once while using a torch to cut down an old satellite dish, starting the grass nearby on fire when a sudden gust of wind came up and started the fire spreading towards our house. I did my best (worst) impression of the first man on the sun, hopping around trying to stomp down the flames and thankfully succeeded.
     
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  12. bogydave

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    Swing by a welding shop.
    Draw up a picture of what you want (on a paper napkin, welder work better using a drawing on a napkin)
    You want aluminum? steel? handle? lid? hinged cover? pour spout? how hig? how wide & deep?
    He'll draw on the napkin & give you something better than can be "store" bought! ;)
     
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  13. thewoodlands

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    You can buy a ash shovel and rake at your local hearth store, I put the ashes in this holder which goes outside in a 10 gallon garbage can that is pictured above right away.

    zap
     

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  14. chumby

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    10-gallon galvanized steel garbage can. It used to be left inside and uncovered to help recover the heat from the still warm embers until I tracked down that it was the reason for the CO sensors registering levels above 30 ppm. So I now open the flue, carefully shovel out the ashes into the can, put the lid on, and take the can outside to a concrete pad to let it sit for a few days. I had been applying to my garden but found it has worked well if I smother poison ivy with it. If the ivy is covered completely it won't be able to photosynthesis; I have considered that the pH shock also helps. A 55-gallon drum gets ashes when there is nowhere else to put them.
     
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  15. Dingeryote

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    Y'all would scream if ya saw what we do.

    Just scatter it on top of the snow over the lawn, and down the driveway. The ash helps with traction and sweetens up the ground a bit for the lawn.
    We don't even bother with an ash can. Hot embers could be a problem with no snow, so untill it flies, it just gets dumped on the farm drive seeing as how sand dosn't burn well.;)

    Hot ash cans burn way too many houses around here.

    Stay safe!
    Dingeryote
     
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  16. Backwoods Savage

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    Welcome to the forum Dingeryote. I doubt many would scream over how you handle the ashes. They have been used for many years in place of salt on driveways, etc. and also used on vegetable gardens as a poor man's lime.
     
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  17. firefighterjake

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    Nah . . . no screaming here . . . I use the cool ash on my driveway in the winter time to help with the traction as well . . . I don't put out any hot ash though since there is always a chance that there could be a coal in the mix . . . and if it's windy it could be blown next to the house and catch some of the wood portion of the house on fire . . . that said . . . even I realize the chances of that happening are really, really, really, really slim . . . but I figure keeping the ash and any coals tucked away in a cheap, covered metal pail for a few days before sprinkling it over my driveway is easy to do.
     
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  18. Phil_Marino

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    If you have any place on your property you can dump ( or spread ) them, that would be better, in a couple of ways, than having them end up in a land fill. There are a lot of good nutrients in ash, and you garden will thank you for it.

    Or, just dump them ( when cool) in any nearby woods.

    Phil
     
  19. firefighterjake

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    True to a point . . . you don't want to overload the garden with the ashes . . . going too heavy with the ashes could in theory change the PH balance which could prove detrimental to the soil and plants. Some folks advocate getting the soil checked to see if extra ash would benefit or harm the soil.
     
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  20. FLINT

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    Ashes, like Lime, could raise the ph of your soil a little,

    we add some to our garden and compost, but we make way more ashes than our raised bed could handle.


    we put our ashes is a big 50 gal drum with no lid and that has holes in the bottom for water to drain out. this way rain and snow quickly eliminate any hot ashes and i never worry about setting anything on fire.
     
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