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Basement Installation

Post in 'The Pellet Mill - Pellet and Multifuel Stoves' started by john1963, Nov 18, 2012.

  1. john1963

    john1963 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    Ontario
    Prior to getting our Englander, we were using A LOT of propane. No natural gas where we are. So after a year or so of research, we decided on the Englander 25 PVC. With the propane, the thermostat was set for 67 F. With the Englander, the temp is now 71 F.

    In the first year, the cost of the Btu produced from the pellets was half of what it would have cost with propane. The second year, we added the thermostat and slashed our pellet use by 30%.The furnace rarely comes on which is good for keeping down the propane that is used.

    We are happy with our Englander which is on the main floor of a two storey home. The center of the house is open so it allows the heat to move around freely and gets upstairs quite well. But of course, the finished basement is always cool and not very inviting. So we are thinking of adding an additional smaller unit downstairs, but with this I will have to go through the block wall. This could be a challenge with keeping proper clearance from the suspended ceiling and then window openings once I get it outside.
    Just seeing what others have done with keeping their finished basement warm.

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  2. Harvey Schneider

    Harvey Schneider Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2012
    Messages:
    983
    Loc:
    Southbury, CT
    Clearance for the vent is only 3" with the PDVC. That shouldn't be hard to accomplish. Going through the wall with a thimble is harder. I had somebody core a hole through the wall above ground, and below sill. The thimble protects the interior wall, and the vent mounts on the outside hold the vent the proper distance from the siding. With a basement the vertical vent inside is visible. I continued the vent vertically outside to above the average snow line. The air intake also has to extend above the snow line.

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