Black Locust/Chimney problems

longboarder2 Posted By longboarder2, Jan 25, 2013 at 1:07 PM

  1. longboarder2

    longboarder2
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    Feb 14, 2012
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    i know locust has lots of btu's---i burn a pretty good bit of it here. i was talking to a nieghbor the other day who had a chimney fire in a fireplace---he blamed it on burning locust.

    seems like an un-educated guess to me. most guys around here split wood all summer into october and burn it in december---they have the way wrong idea about "seasoned" wood. what killed me is that the chimney was only a year or two old and burned casually.

    anyone else burn lots of locust and have chimney/flue issues or feel that it would require additional chimney sweeping attention?
     
  2. jeromehdmc

    jeromehdmc
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    My stove doesn't run 24/7 but I did put about 2 cords of wood through it last year. Most was Locust. When I cleaned the pipes I got about 3 cups of soot no creosote except for a little shiny stuff at the very top.
    Locust that is seasoned burns great, any wood that is seasoned well shouldn't give you any problems. I have guys around here that think dry wood burns too fast. Just be sure your wood is seasoned and you should be good.
     
  3. lukem

    lukem
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    Species of wood correlation to chimney fire risk is probably about the same as correlation of the type of beer you drink and your shoe size. There may be a little bit of something there, but not much.

    It's all about how you burn (hot vs smoldery) and the moisuture content. A runaway load of black locust can spark a fire in an already dirty chimney...and so could a runaway load of balsa wood.
     
  4. tbuff

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    So that's why I only wear a size 11...
     
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  5. Badfish740

    Badfish740
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    The longer I burn wood the more I begin to believe that you really have to be negligent to have a chimney fire. I am always astonished at how little creosote I get in my chimney and I choke the air down for overnights, I sometimes find myself burning the not-so-dry stuff in March when I'm at the end of my seasoned supply :p, etc... On an unrelated note, welcome longboarder! Good to see more Jersey folks around the board. I don't have my location displayed now that I realize it but I'm up toward the Northwest corner of the state. I used to hunt and 4 wheel the pines a lot though.
     
  6. oldspark

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    Yep you either have a bad set up or are your burning wrong, amazing how many people come up with hair brain theorys on why they have problems, you see it on here all the time.
    Heres my guess, BL is a very dense wood and even when dry can be hard to get going, if it was not seasoned he had two strikes against him, so with his reasoning I suppose it was the BL.:confused:
     
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  7. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck
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    Locust is very dense and can smoulder if the stove isn't hot enough. In a fireplace it could be tough to get a hot enough fire to get the locust really burning well, and that could cause a lot of smoke and creosote buildup. As I see it locust could be directly tied to the chimney fire. The only other wood that could cause similar problems would be other hardwoods. And softwoods.
     
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  8. mikey517

    mikey517
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    Northwest corner?? Sussex County?? We be neighbors maybe??
     
  9. lukem

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    There you have it, if you don't burn wood will not have a chimney fire. Excellent deduction.;)
     
  10. oldspark

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    Oh thats what people are doing wrong.
     
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  11. lukem

    lukem
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    I'll have to check with FF Jake, but I believe burning wood is the #1 cause of chimney fires.
     
  12. oldspark

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    Maybe that fact will help some out.:p
     
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  13. tbuff

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    Really? !!!
     
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  14. Badfish740

    Badfish740
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    I think the takeaway here is that locust is just too risky to burn. If you guys bring it to my house I'll dispose of it for you ==c

    Not quite that far up-Northwest Hunterdon County near Warren County. My in-laws live outside of Newton though.
     
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  15. Paulywalnut

    Paulywalnut
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    This could be the end of Hearth forums:(
     
  16. Shane N

    Shane N
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    You should probably dispose of his leftover BL if he has any. Don't want him to start another chimney fire, ya know...
     
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  17. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage
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    And here we thought it was only pine that did this... And why do they split in the summer? Shouldn't they wait until October to start! Probably wouldn't need the wood until then anyway...
     
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  18. cygnus

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    Locust burns just fine in central Jersey. I think the chimney fires correlate mostly to latitude.
     
  19. smokinj

    smokinj
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    Wow! I just keep my splitter at the front door. Its my new just in time method. ;)
     
  20. tbuff

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    I think it burns great! Burned it this morning while I put my skillet on top of the stove and cooked 6 eggs and a mini frozen pizza... Going old school.
     
  21. blwncrewchief

    blwncrewchief
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    Nope, No problem burning well seasoned locust. In fact, if anything, I would tend to say my chimney looks better burning locust than most woods.
     
  22. mywaynow

    mywaynow
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    Pine is also blamed for chimney fires. Seems both have the potential to burn hotter than other woods. Locust in general has high BTU, but pine will flash out quickly and could ignite creosote during that short hot time. Chimney fires are more common than stovepipe fires becuase the masonry construction is hard to heat up and keep hot. Cold stone and hot smoke equals creosote.
     
  23. The Blackheathburner

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    Has any one burnt holm oak and what do you think of it.
     
  24. chipsoflyin

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    locust burned in an open fireplace throws sparks
     
  25. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage
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    Welcome to the forum Blackheathburner.


    Probably none on this forum. Isn't that one of the European trees?
     

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