black locust

Dr Bigwood Posted By Dr Bigwood, Nov 22, 2008 at 1:28 AM

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  1. Dr Bigwood

    Dr Bigwood
    New Member 2.
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    Dec 13, 2005
    48
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    Loc:
    Dowling, MI
    Right MT. I'll have to experiment with black locust. My Stove is a Castine so the fire box isn't the biggest. Coals do take up some room!
     
  2. ansehnlich1

    ansehnlich1
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 5, 2006
    1,601
    218
    Loc:
    Adams County, PA
    The stuff burns great, it can sit around for years and still burn great, when it gets real old it turns grey, you'll likely be burning it when the color is still yellowish/greenish....it stays that color for quite some time.

    Used for fence posts where I'm from. I've pulled old farm post that I know were in the ground for 50 years or more, and burned 'em just fine.

    One of the best burning firewoods out there, IMHO.

    I always use a big round or split of BLACK Locust or Apple for overnight burns when it's friiiiiiiigid outside.
     
  3. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 19, 2008
    4,153
    994
    Loc:
    Shelton, WA

    ???????????????????????

    Now I've read everything.
     
  4. MadTripper

    MadTripper
    New Member 2.
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    Sep 27, 2008
    40
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    Loc:
    Northeast PA
    I pulled some locust out of my wood pile and worked on it a little in the shop. I ended up with two chunks like the following and haven't figured out what to use them for. I did carry one in my car for a bit to use as an "anti-carjacking device". Anyways, thought I'd post them.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Tripper
     
  5. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson
    Mod Emeritus 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 18, 2005
    5,875
    147
    Loc:
    Central NYS
    I work in the forest products industry, so my definition of "commercial value" is probably a bit skewed. No doubt, woods like black locust and specialty species like butternut have nice niche markets that exploit their unique attributes. They're just not part of the wider commercial commodities market like hard maple, red oak or black cherry. Most sawmills, in other words, won't buy black locust.

    It does make beautiful lumber, IMO. I love the green color and distinctive grain/pore pattern.
     
  6. MadTripper

    MadTripper
    New Member 2.
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    Sep 27, 2008
    40
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    Loc:
    Northeast PA
    That is funny. I was at a biomass conference on Friday and the local forester kept saying how we were being over run with "junk wood like birch, beech, locust..." and I thought to myself, that isn't junk wood, that is some of the best heat per volume wood you can get!!! Of course I mainly think in terms of usefulness for my stove whereas this guy thinks in terms of wood for $$$$. It is a wonder you don't see more applications for locust, like decks, outdoor furniture etc etc. I wanted to use locust around my garden instead of treated or RR ties so I didn't have to question what was leaching into my soil.

    Chris
     
  7. savageactor7

    savageactor7
    Minister of Fire 2.
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    Jan 25, 2008
    3,708
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    Loc:
    CNY
    ???????????????????????

    Now I've read everything.[/quote]

    There's a lot of folks that consider Locusts to be an invasive species. Once they established they take right over. Nothing else grows by them. They put out tons or thorny suckers and baby trees and yes those thorns will give any wheeled vehicle flats.
     
  8. Ken45

    Ken45
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 21, 2008
    545
    1
    Loc:
    southern Ohio
    I think there is confusion between black locust and honey locust. Black locust only has small thorns (1/4") and then only on the small branches. Probably less of an issue than blackberry bushes. Honey locust is the one with the BIG 3 to 5 inch tire piercing thorns that are on the trunk as well as the branches.

    Both are supposed to be good firewood. Black locust makes the long lasting fence posts. I've read mixed things about the rot resistance of honey locust.

    Ken
     
  9. Gooserider

    Gooserider
    Mod Emeritus 2.
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    Nov 20, 2006
    6,737
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    Loc:
    Northeastern MA (near Lowell)
    1. Does black locust grow in Massachusetts?

    If so,

    2. Where can I get some healthy trees suitable for planting?

    Gooserider
     
  10. DaveBP

    DaveBP
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    May 25, 2008
    1,141
    29
    Loc:
    SW Maine
    Yes, it grows like mad in Mass. Used for roadside landscaping on interstates a lot.

    I checked the usual mail order nurseries and Mass. apparently has a ban on importing them. You can collect seeds from any trees around and they grow easily. 2 feet per year if they have decent soil. I have one in front of my house that I planted 18 years ago as a 1 year seedling. It's 30 ft. tall now and shades my living room nicely in the summer.

    You might find a mail order outfit that will ship to you. Google up what you can and check out their listings for black locust. Some are less particular about state restrictions than others.
     
  11. Jeff S

    Jeff S
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Aug 31, 2008
    325
    16
    Loc:
    Kimball,Michigan
    I have Black Locust growing in my back yard I think they have a very nice canopy and the blooms are beautiful in the spring.They propagate from both seeds and from the root system and will become a weed if not kept in check but that doesn't seem to be a problem with the wood burners.
     
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