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Blaze King Ashford Bio-Brick challenge.

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by webby3650, Dec 4, 2013.

  1. Ansky

    Ansky Member

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    This is an interesting thread, and I'm intrigued and have questions.

    I realize that these long burn times are a result of both the stove and the bricks. I'm wondering if I'd get longer burn times with my non-cat insert if I'd use some of these bricks. I'm thinking specifically for overnight burns on the coldest nights. Usually when I go to bed at 11, and wake up at 7, there aren't many coals left. That hasn't been a problem yet this year as the weather has been pretty mild, but when the really cold temps and wind come, the house can get pretty chilly in the morning. I'm wondering if these bricks will help me bridge that gap from bedtime to morning.

    I know there's only 1 way to truly find out, but I thought I'd ask here first. Thanks.

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  2. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    I don't believe the goal was to get the cheapest heat per hour but to see just how far you can stretch burn times. 50 hours is two days and what this means to many of us is that you can actually go away for the weekend and have the stove burn unattended the whole time.

    Seems you have to be around to load those bags of pellets and if you're around you may as well be loading firewood.

    What does BK have to say about pressed wood products? I recall other manufacturers forbidding them.
    jeff_t and BrotherBart like this.
  3. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    Your situation is the biggest reason I dumped my previous non-cat for a cat stove. Even at high output I will always have a large fire burning 12 hours later. I tried some biobrick type products in my non-cat and they extended the burn time slightly but be warned, they can take off on you and overfire the stove.
  4. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage Minister of Fire

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    Pics? How "burnt down" were they? Freaking facinating stuff, if only there was fire of some sort to look at while it was doing that. Still darn tempting.
  5. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    I don't believe there is any issues as long as it's compressed wood and nothing else.
  6. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage Minister of Fire

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    BKVP posted something about testing some different products and specifically approving them by brand for use not too long ago.
  7. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage Minister of Fire

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    In our experiance using Ecobricks (the old style smaller ones that were 8 in a pack, I don't think TS sells anymore), we did NOT get a better burn time, they only helped get a better burn with lower quality (not seasoned) wood. I forgot we did try one brick only load, but it didn't burn longer than a mixed load of bricks and hardwood. Hard to compare, since our hardwood wasn't seasoned and now our seasoned wood is mostly pine. I don't think you'd get a longer burn, but they are good for those with unseasoned wood or no storage for seasoning wood.

    I think the main "trick" here was this is a BK stove. That seems to have been a long burn for the Ashford (I think they are rated for 30 hours? Maybe?) but not outside the realm of possible even with a similar load of dry hardwood.

    The thing with these bricks is the super low moisture content. Gotta be careful and follow the mrg's directions for loading the stove with them, especially a tube stove. You're filling your stove with VERY dry fuel, so operate it accordingly.
  8. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    Not sure how big your stove is but with out the stove packed all that tight I can have coals to start a fire after 12 hours, thats with Oak.
  9. Ansky

    Ansky Member

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    Thanks all for the replies. It sounds like the bricks won't do much for me in terms of extending burn times. Oh well.
    BTW - my stove has a firebox of 2.08 CF. I'm sure my shorter burn times are a result of the type of wood I'm buring. I'm burning mainly beech and tulip poplar. Some Oak, and some Maple. I live in the woods, and this is what I have around me and it's free, so I burn it!
  10. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    Well there are a couple of tricks. The BK stove for sure with a low stat setting. But also the amount of btus that those bricks represent. I weighed a load of firewood packed tightly in my princess and it was only 43 lbs. It was red alder which is a "hardwood" but not hickory or anything. For that partial load to equal 76 lbs means there is that much more fuel to attain a longer burn time.
  11. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    I'm at almost 24 hours in. The stove top was still at 550 when I went to bed at 10 last night. It was about 500 when a dog got me up at 2, and the house was about 70. At 6 this morning, the house was down to 67, and the stove 400.

    Currently, the outside temp is 27, almost 10 degrees less than yesterday, breezy, and cloudy. The stove top is at 400 again, but the house is 73. I think the difference is that the whole stove is hot. When it was at 550, that was right on top of the cat. There was nothing visible in the firebox, just some smoke when I shined a flashlight in it, and a bright orange cat. Now, there isn't much left to smoke. It is all a bunch of hot, glowing clumps. I actually just turned it all the way to low, because I just turned the oven on for a few hours to season some cast iron. Already warm enough in here.

    I'll probably let it go until I get up at 0130 for work. That will be about 34 hours. That's on par with what I would get from 120 lbs of wood while burning at these temps.

    By the way, these are Red Stone-branded Eco Bricks. I read something about a change in vendors in the northeast, but that's what we have in MI.

    CAM00137.jpg
  12. BKVP

    BKVP Burning Hunk

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    Hey guys been in Fairbanks all week so just now having time to comment...sitting in SEATAC. I would admonish all to not exceed a reasonable amount of processed fuel at any given time. First, we have had several processed fuels tested and so far only one caused concern...and they are now bust.

    The concern should be a "what if" scenario. What if the fuel fell against the glass and cracked it? Yes the thermostats are designed to operate within certain parameters, 2,000,000 BTUs in a single load not being one of them.

    Also not all wood stove owners are as knowledgeable and diligent about gaskets, seals etc as you guys.

    I know 33 NIEL's can fit in a King. At 60,000 BTUs per log....That's getting close to 2,000,000 in a single load. If the what if scenario played out.....thermo nuclear!

    Well, off to Ohio and Michigan....clear the roads for me please.

    Burn Responsibly,

    Chris
  13. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    It's been an interesting experiment for me. I have played with them in the past, amd knew what to expect.

    The controllability of your stoves is unequalled, for sure.

    Michigan roads are fine. I'll be in the middle of the OH crap in about 12 hours.
  14. BKVP

    BKVP Burning Hunk

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    Plow them for me! Drag your old stove behind your truck!
  15. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    I've been looking at pellet add-on boilers. Some hoppers can hold north of 200 lbs of pellets.
  16. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    I guess I should have added a disclaimer:
    "All stoves are not created equal. Tests seen in the Webb test facility should not be tried at home. All will not see these results, only Blaze King owners should expect to see these results. All others use extreme caution"
    ;lol
  17. alforit

    alforit Feeling the Heat

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    Amen Brother!
  18. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    Sure, but not the much much more typical pellet stove that would appear on a hearth. As I recall, they typically hold a bag or two right?
  19. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Indeed, what is impressive is the 50 hr burn time with 26lbs of brick fuel.
    Chris said he burns Northern Idaho Energy Logs which are a fine product made from very densely pressed sawdust.
  20. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Most full sized pellet stoves hold 60 to 80 lbs or 1.5 to 2 bags of pellets. 200lbs would be 5 bags. Serious home boiler systems are set up with interior silos that hold tons of pellets that are bulk delivered.
  21. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    You did mean 76lbs?
  22. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Yep
  23. weatherguy

    weatherguy Minister of Fire

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    That's what I have too, I was going to load the stove with them but Chris gave me reason to pause.

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