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Blaze King Contact

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by BKVP, Oct 11, 2011.

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  1. rdust

    rdust Minister of Fire

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    Their manual recommends 6" minimum for the rear clearance on a free standing stove even if it's non combustible wall due to the radiant heat causing issues with the T-Stat. Mine is right at the 6" mark per BK's recommendation.

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  2. ddddddden

    ddddddden Minister of Fire

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    Jason, burning wood with metal in it will contaminate the cat. Doh!
  3. BKVP

    BKVP Burning Hunk

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    I would try the shield but if the shield absorbs and radiates the heat back, it will not improve the situation. You can try moving the stove out to the minimum 6" or us a non combustible material that is also non heat reflective.
    Thank you

    Chris
  4. Beetle-Kill

    Beetle-Kill Minister of Fire

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    stay away from galvanized nails and staples.
  5. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    So then, how does OAK affect thermostat operation? I asked this once before, but now we can get a good answer :)
  6. BKVP

    BKVP Burning Hunk

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    Metals are not good in a catalytic wood stove. Burning of metals released into the fire then can over-plate the precious metals (catalyst) that is applied to the substrate. For this same reason, paper with colored ink should also be avoided in any catalytic wood stove as they too are high in metals content.

    One further observation....While all these matters, metal, high moisture content, burning of pallets & drift wood etc are hard on catalytic wood stoves, in non catalytic wood stoves they can actually go out the flue and into the environment. (And in the case of saline laden wood eat your stove and chimney metals), Catalytic stoves are superb in they can destroy 100% of VOC's when above 550 degrees and about 65% of methane gases.

    Blaze King makes both catalytic and non catalytic wood stoves and both have their place in the wood stove market and can fit specific user needs.

    Thank you
    Chris
  7. BKVP

    BKVP Burning Hunk

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    jeff_t

    Oak is awesome. All the guys in the west dream of having hickory, oak, maple and other hardwoods. Heck the guys in Alaska have birch, aspen and some pine, but they'd give their right arm for oak. (They would actually give both arms but then they wouldn't be able to load their Blaze King's!

    The secret to good heat is good wood. Goal one is seasoned, dry wood regardless of species. When you burn wood, you boil the water out of the wood. On our test stands you will find the single greatest depreciation in wood weight is the first hour or so because that is when the water is being boiled out at the greatest volume.

    That is why if a person goes to bed at 9:00 p.m. and loads the stove full of wood that is a bit green and shuts the stove down for the night, they can plug up the combustor or really make a mess of the inside of the firebox. If instead the same guy would load the stove at 8:00 p.m., run the stove on high for an hour and then shut it down, the moisture will mostly have been consumed by the combustion process.

    Also, recoverable Btu energy is highest when you minimize the amount of steam you create when burning wet wood. So, the steam cools the steel body of the stove and you can get the feeling you are not getting as much heat as you had hoped.

    So burn good dry wood in ALL wood stoves, which will keep the stove, combustor (if equipped), chimney and environment cleaner (PM 2.5 increase with an increase in moisture content, especially in non catalytic wood stoves).

    Solid, good questions guys!


    Chris
  8. jtb51b

    jtb51b Feeling the Heat

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    Well I will weed out the ones with metal on them.. Only get a couple splits a year with this problem so it should be easy.. I will look into moving my stove out from the wall.. Should not be hard to do just need a 6" piece of single wall and I'll be on the move. Man I hope this fixes the issues I had last year, sure would be nice to say it was just my stupid mistake instead of a problem stove!

    Thanks again,

    Jason
  9. BKVP

    BKVP Burning Hunk

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    And Oak, because it has such great heat potential based on potential load volume, you can actually run it at a lower thermostat setting from a greater period of time. Still, moisture content is key.
  10. BKVP

    BKVP Burning Hunk

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    jtb51b:

    If moving it out does not fix the issue you are having, call me directly and we can see about working together to make it work as intended. We want you to be pleased with your investment. My office number is 509-522-2730. You can reach me any time after 6:00 a.m. PST.

    Thank you
    Chris
  11. mellow

    mellow Resident Stove Connoisseur

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    Is there a measurement of draft one could use to figure out if a King would work on a 6" liner?

    I could understand a 6" single wall to 6"double wall 15 ft chimney, but what about a 6" all double wall straight 25 ft chimney?
  12. Hass

    Hass Minister of Fire

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    You've got me confused here.
    I'm assuming you say you can run it at a lower thermostat setting because of the heat oak produces.

    But I was assuming the thermostat regulates the heat output?
    Running the thermostat on 2, will provide a constant heat output regardless of what species of wood you burn. Oak, Pine, Willow, Hedge, would all produce the same amount of heat, the only variable is the burn time increasing the more dense the wood.
    This was my assumption of how the thermostat worked.
  13. jtb51b

    jtb51b Feeling the Heat

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    I think he means it would make heat at a lower setting for longer, while still doing it cleanly...
  14. jtb51b

    jtb51b Feeling the Heat

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    Thank you Chris, I will look into it ASAP and let you know when things get rolling well enough to tell.. I am going to be replacing the door gasket this year in an attempt to fix my problems as well, but (thinking out loud here) it makes perfect sense that the block wall could be causing my erratic thermostat behavior.

    Jason
  15. BKVP

    BKVP Burning Hunk

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    Sorry, I confuse my wife as well...often.

    Because oak is heavier or more dense, you can fit more wood into a given space than let's say cottonwood, a much faster growing lighter wood. Because you can get more wood by volume into given firebox, at "X: Btu's per hour, the heavier, denser wood will burn longer.

    Clear as mud?

    Chris
  16. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    I was talking about Outside Air Kit.
  17. BKVP

    BKVP Burning Hunk

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    New to forum...OAK is a wood species to me.

    The outside air kit helps greatly because you no longer burn room air for combustion. (Air you may have already used wood to heat)

    The outside air kit brings cold air in but it is warmed as it passes into the firebox. Personally, I have used less wood in my home since installing a fresh air kit. I also few fewer cold draft moving across the floor towards the stove.

    If you go from not using a fresh air kit to using one, you may find that you will not run the thermostat as high since you will be using fresh and not room air.

    Thanks for the clarification....

    Chris
  18. Hiram Maxim

    Hiram Maxim Minister of Fire

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    Welcome to the Forum Mr. Vice President! :)

    Now if You would, please "private message" me the alien technology secrets.......... :roll:

    Thank you, Hiram
  19. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    So the thermostat is affected by stove temperature, not combustion air temperature? The manual makes it sound like combustion air is drawn thru the thermostat and that is what makes the bimetal coil do its thing. The discussion earlier concerning the stove too close to the wall and radiated heat having an effect on the thermostat's operation made me wonder what happens when you introduce cold air from outside.
  20. Swedishchef

    Swedishchef Minister of Fire

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    Welcome to the forums!

    It's nice to see companies popping up online, it shows that they care! More and more people are signing up here. I always recommend this site to people I know who are wood heaters.

    Now if only I would have been able to make it to my local hardware store 2 weeks ago. There was a BK rep there showing off their stoves to the public for 5 days.

    Andrew
  21. Hass

    Hass Minister of Fire

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    That's what I thought he said at first, which is why I was so confused.
    The heat output should always be the same regardless of wood species because of blaze kings thermostat... The only variable that would change is the burn time.
    At least that's what my interpretation of it was.


    Yes, when you said you can burn at a lower temperature setting for longer, that made me question the purpose of the thermostat... Because that sounds more like a regular damper/air control that you always have to fiddle with... and not the set it and forget it Tstat.

    So I have a million dollar question...
    Can you divulge the BTU output at each temperature setting for your stoves? (IE, #1 is 7000BTU, #2 is 14000BTU, #3 28000BTU)
    I see with your King model you have been able to graph it on low burn to figure out how many lbs are burned per hour in the brochure... I'm just wondering if you did it with all your stoves.
    If you can't say, it's no big deal.
    I ask too many questions... I know :]
  22. BKVP

    BKVP Burning Hunk

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    Sorry the actual settings are proprietary.

    Thanks
    Chris
  23. Hass

    Hass Minister of Fire

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    Now that sounds like a challenge.
    Which I graciously accept your challenge, sir.

    You also just confused the hell out of me again after your comment about the OAK changing the temperature of the thermostat versus using inside air.
    Which would mean on colder days the output would vary on warmer days.
    Almost like the way a boiler system increases the temperature of the water circulating through the system on colder days to provide more heat.
    Interesting... Or perhaps it's the opposite, as the colder air would cool the stove... However cold air carries more oxygen than warm air, so perhaps... Oh boy.
    Or else I'm just reading in to it too much, which is most likely.
    However.
    I believe I've asked my fair share of questions.
    I also believe I have some alien technology to inspect.

    Like I said before, welcome to the forums.
    :)
    I hope your stay here is long lived.
  24. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Welcome to the forum Chris! I wish all stove manufacturers had a rep here!

    Ray
  25. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    BKVP I don't have one of your stoves because it won't fit in my fireplace free standing and I never want another insert. But I posted years ago that you folks have the best user's manual in the business. You actually tell people in detail how to burn in the stove. Not just "Light the fire and watch for glowing."

    Kudos for that. All the rest should take a lesson from ya on that.

    And a question. Do you believe it is possible to build a non-cat stove with a thermostat that could pass the EPA cert. test? I ask because you guys seem to be the Thermo Kings, well actually that is a trailer refrigeration unit, but you know what I mean.
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