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Buck Stove 27000

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by mawift, Feb 9, 2014.

  1. mawift

    mawift New Member

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    I recently got a Buck stove 26000 or 27000 not sure exactly which one. My question Is about installation, the manual says to install it into fireplace and seal with faceplate and use existing box and chimney for venting. I know this is an old stove and manual and am wondering if I need to install 8" SS piping up the existing chimney with an adapter, which is clay lined and has been inspected and is good. Any information about the proper way to install this stove would be great.

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  2. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    You definitely need an adapter boot and liner for that beast. When they first came out with the old inserts they recommended "slammer" installs like that manual says and learned that was a mistake. I had a large pre-EPA insert for 21 years and chimney fires and dragging it out of the fireplace every year to clean glazed creosote out of the smoke chamber of the chimney were facts of life.

    And the liner makes for a lot more efficient operation of the stove.
  3. mawift

    mawift New Member

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    Thanks for the info. Is it possible to reduce to a 6" insulated liner or does that stove need an 8" liner?
  4. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    If the chimney is 20' or so a six inch liner should work fine. It did when I put a liner on my old insert. In fact it drafted too hard because the people that designed the insert never dreamed of chimney liners.
  5. valley ranch

    valley ranch Feeling the Heat

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    If it were me, I would go with a 8" liner, you have a damper on that stove and slide vents in the doors. Once you seal around the glass and doors, even where the two doors meet you can control the burn pretty well.
    I recently picked up a 27000, wish it were a 28000, haven't sealed it up yet, when I install it as a free standing it will be with an 8" chimney, every chimney we have are 8". We have another ranch In the high desert, I may install it there.
    Thanks for the info Bart, never knew Buck suggested installing their stoves as slammers. We bought this one for a relative, who decided to stay with an open fireplace.

    mawift, When you install the Buck, please show what you've done, and let us know how you sealed it, and how you find it fires best as far as the adjustments, amount of wood and such. Always kind of liked them.

    Richard
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2014
  6. ryjen

    ryjen Member

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    Open your doors and measure the opening.

    18 inches = 26000
    20 inches = 27000
    24 inches = 28000
  7. atmarx

    atmarx New Member

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    Wish I'd read this before I bought my liner. When I bought my 27000 off of Craigslist, the previous owner included the 8" stack converter with it. Reading through the manual, I assumed it needed an 8" flue liner too, so I bought it. 8" is a real PITA to work with if you need any kinds of bends (which of course mine did...) If I had known I would be okay with 6" smooth wall, I would have gone with that. Oh well. I'll find out tomorrow how nicely it all works when my dad helps me finish hooking it up. We had to wait for an adjustable elbow to get delivered because no matter what we did, we couldn't get the angle right last weekend.
  8. ryjen

    ryjen Member

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    I have an 8" to 6" reducer on my 26000 and she drafts like a champ. Almost too well! Once the stove reaches 400, I can close her off and she'll stay there for hours.
  9. valley ranch

    valley ranch Feeling the Heat

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    atmarx, I'd rather have the 8" even if you can get away with 6". Let us know how you like that 27000.

    Richard
  10. atmarx

    atmarx New Member

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    Two weekends in a row now finding out I can't run the stove :( The stove sits pretty far forward, and we just can't get the liner to connect to the stock stack because it sits up so high. I broken down and ordered a low profile adapter to bolt onto the top of the stove. Hopefully it arrives today and I'll be burning for Thanksgiving. It looks like the bottom opening is large enough to give me a lot of wiggle room in terms of placement. If this doesn't work, the whole stove is going up on Craigslist and I'll just get a newer stove with the exhaust in the back. Too much work to try to get an older inefficient stove running cleanly.

    Although, even just slamming it in last year with no flue liner, when it was burning dry wood nice and hot, there really wasn't a lot of smoke (visible at least) coming out. I guess even older stoves can run (sort of) clean if you're putting the right wood into them.
  11. ryjen

    ryjen Member

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    This is a common "argument" 'round these parts, but I wouldn't really call the older stoves "inefficient".
    Naturally as time has gone by the newer stoves burn more efficiently, but with the right install, the older ones are more than capable of
    heating, and heating well. I'm not sure why your stove is sitting so far forward unless you don't have the recomended clearances as noted
    in the owners manual. How deep/tall is your firebox?
  12. atmarx

    atmarx New Member

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    It sits forward so the side panels sit flush with the front of the fireplace. There's only about 2-3" of the stove's top plate sticking out. Sitting there, it has about 2" between the back fan shroud and the rear of the fireplace. I cut out the back of the cast iron damper assembly, but there's a large front plate with masonry in front of it, and I don't want to compromise that setup at all. The way the pipe has to bend, it looks like the boot I ordered will give the right angle (20deg) for the boot insert to fit right in. The problem was with the stock stack and a 90 deg adjustable pipe, the whole assembly came up 18" before the bend, which was bumping into the metal. Even if we could have gotten it to fit and sit right up against the metal, I wouldn't want that for the long term since the 90 deg had no insulation on it. If this boot works as well as I hope, it'll be clean - stove, boot, flue liner. The adjustable elbows weren't air tight, and if they heat up and expand, it's possible for them to pop apart. I wish I'd known before I ordered them (2 @ $50 a pop), but I'd rather throw away $100 than burn my house down :)
  13. atmarx

    atmarx New Member

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    Finally got it installed. The Ventinox 8" boot was the key -- I couldn't believe how perfectly it fit. Sealed it up with Flue Goo and self-tapping screws, and it's running well. I wish I had replaced the thermostat before I got everything sealed up, but that'll be a project for next spring instead. For now, I'll have to make do with remembering to turn the fan on or off (or maybe getting my arduino thermocouple/relay project finished...)

    So far, the 8" liner is drafting strongly. I stuffed a lot of extra rock wool up into the opening and more down the top. Is there such a thing as too much insulation around the liner?
  14. valley ranch

    valley ranch Feeling the Heat

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    Hi, The stove we have at our mountain ranch, where we are now, had just a thermostat. I installed a switch so I could turn it on, because it had to get very hot, and burn too long before it came on. I also have a buck, they take a long time to come on, it's worth having a manual switch on it as well.

    Richard
  15. ryjen

    ryjen Member

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    Richard, I don't notice it taking very long at all for my 26000 fan to come on. I'm interested in what type of installation you have. Is it free standing or insert? Outside wall or interior?

    Maybe when the craziness in my household slows down I can take some time and make notes of how long from cold it takes my stove fans to kick on.
  16. valley ranch

    valley ranch Feeling the Heat

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    Greetings ryjen, I have the Buck but it's not installed. When I fired it it was sitting down front or the garage, maybe that's why it took a while. We bought it for an aunt who decided to stay with her open fireplace.

    Richard

    I may install it up here when I rebuild the Centennial.
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2014

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