1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

Build Fire on a Grate or on Floor of Stove

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by boatboy63, Dec 31, 2010.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. boatboy63

    boatboy63 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2010
    Messages:
    188
    Loc:
    Northeastern TN
    Just wondering what you guys consider the proper way of building a fire. Do you use a grate to lay your logs on top of, or do you just lay them on the floor of the stove and burn from there?

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. jabush

    jabush Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2006
    Messages:
    385
    Loc:
    Howard County, MD
    There is a note cast into the back of my stove door that states "do not use grate, build fire directly on hearth". Hearth being the firebrick on the floor of the firebox.
    I don't use a grate.
  3. tcassavaugh

    tcassavaugh Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2010
    Messages:
    897
    Loc:
    Southern Maryland
    most of the stoves i've seen with grates are located in the middle and fairly large. Both the VC and Jotul i have have grates (and i love them for ash removal) and i build right on top of them. i just don't shake out all the ash on subsiquent fires. I leave some in there set the fire in and hug the coals. I've never seen instructions, in a stove, not to build on the grate.

    jmho

    cass
  4. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2008
    Messages:
    7,358
    Loc:
    NW Ontario
    My stove's manual warns not to install a grate. There is a very real danger of overfiring a stove that was not designed to have a grate. There is even a risk of overfiring by N/S loading without a grate.

    Overfiring could occur by not being able to turn it down enough once it gets away on you, or by pilot error.

    My personal opinion is that most people that want to put in a grate do so because their wood is marginal (too wet) or have poor draft issues.
  5. tcassavaugh

    tcassavaugh Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2010
    Messages:
    897
    Loc:
    Southern Maryland
    if a grate is IN the stove as an intragal part of the stove wasn't it designed to have one in it? Mabe i'm reading the post wrong.

    cass
  6. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,815
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Boatboy, you might help everyone if you add your stove in the signature line. Notice how many others do that and it helps to answer questions.
  7. jabush

    jabush Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2006
    Messages:
    385
    Loc:
    Howard County, MD
    If the stove actually came from the factory with a grate, then it is probably designed to be burned with grate in place.
    I (personally) wouldn't add a grate if the stove did not come with one.
  8. Fsappo

    Fsappo Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2008
    Messages:
    3,946
    Loc:
    Central NY
    Do what your owners manual says. "most" stoves dont need a grate installed. Do what Dennis said. Post what stove you own and watch the answers start pouring in.
  9. Dakotas Dad

    Dakotas Dad Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,384
    Loc:
    Central Kentucky
    I *think* you are confusing a "fire grate" like in a fire place, with an ash grate, like in most wood stoves.. The ash grate is built into the bottom of the stove, a fire grate sits atop the floor and holds the wood/fire off the bottom. My manual says never use a fire grate. and honestly, I never use the ash grate.lol
  10. tcassavaugh

    tcassavaugh Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2010
    Messages:
    897
    Loc:
    Southern Maryland
    i thought it might have been a fireplace grate, but then thought no.....no one would do that. But then again, they might. I love the ash grate in the bottom of my stoves i used to use. it came as part of the stove and had the ash bin below it. I hate the "trap door" in the summit......little bitty door instead of a grate, great big ash bin. Go figure. neither too much good in this case. I just find it more convenient to use the ash pan rather than scoop from the stove.

    jmho

    cass
  11. boatboy63

    boatboy63 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2010
    Messages:
    188
    Loc:
    Northeastern TN
    Done. As you can see, it is a 30+ year old model 27000 Buck Stove Insert. I don't know if it originally came with a grate or not. It used to belong to my FIL and he is long gone now. We have been using a grate in it, but when I went to clean ashes out this morning (2x a week deal), noticed the center part of grate frame had broke loose and was in my way of getting the ashes out. I ended up pulling it and am burning without it now. Stove does have a refractory floor but no firebrick on sides. We will see what it does without it. The old grate caused the logs to stay 2-3" above the bottom so this should help with longer burn times, considering I essentially just added 3" of height to my firebox.
  12. Buck74

    Buck74 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2011
    Messages:
    12
    Loc:
    Rural Lafayette County, MS
    I grew up with a Buck 27000. We always used andirons. I believe it even came with them.

    Fast forward 30 years I just purchased my very own Buck 74. I talked to their techs several times during my selection process and was very pleased with their support system. I bet if you call the factory they can answer your question.

    Buck Stove Corp.(828) 765-6144
  13. Spencer H.

    Spencer H. New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2008
    Messages:
    7
    Loc:
    Eastern Tennessee
    I have the same insert - how is it going without a grate? Can you post a picture of your firebox showing the refractory? I'm tired of replacing grates that have burned through and would love to hear more experiences of burning in this box without a grate...
  14. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,873
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    A good place to start would be the manual!

    Attached Files:

  15. Spencer H.

    Spencer H. New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2008
    Messages:
    7
    Loc:
    Eastern Tennessee
    Interesting. The manual for the 27000 stove found on this page (http://www.buckstove.com/stovemanuals.html)
    says that firedogs are supplied with the stove, which elevates the fire as does a grate. What manual is that picture from?
  16. budman

    budman Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2006
    Messages:
    617
    Loc:
    Valley Cottage,NY
    Well done BG .
  17. Dakotas Dad

    Dakotas Dad Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,384
    Loc:
    Central Kentucky
    A quick call to my buddies brother in law, who has been selling/servicing Buck stoves non stop since 1980 says as he remembers, the fire dogs only came with and should only be used with the FirePlace model, FP201. He also says Buck Stoves manuals where not the best "back then". lol
  18. DanCorcoran

    DanCorcoran Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2010
    Messages:
    2,099
    Loc:
    Richmond, VA
    Who knew?

    I found this on page 55 of the Buck 27000 manual:

    "HOW TO COOL IT IN THE SUMMER
    Empty and clean the firebox of all ashes at the end of the heating season, touch·up the exterior
    of the stove with an approved stove paint (spray type preferable) and you will be ready
    when the next heating season rolls around. You do not need to let your BUCK STOVE sit idle
    during the warm summer months. Your versatile BUCK STOVE will double as at cool air cir·
    culator during the summer. It's very simple.
    1. Fill four containers (plastic milk containers work very well) with water and freeze.
    2. Place frozen containers inside the cleaned firebox on their sides.
    3. Close doors and all dampers and switch the fan to the "manual" setting. This by-passes the
    thermostat so the fan will run continuously.
    Four one gallon frozen containers will provide reasonable cooling. Don't expect your stove to
    cool as well as It heats, but this is a nice, extra feature for your benefit."

    P.S. Make sure the lids on those jugs are on tight...they're on their side!
  19. Spencer H.

    Spencer H. New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2008
    Messages:
    7
    Loc:
    Eastern Tennessee
    Not saying your buddy's BIL is wrong, but Buck still sells firedogs for the old Buck inserts...

    http://www.buckstove.com/partsstore/home.php?cat=21
  20. Dakotas Dad

    Dakotas Dad Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,384
    Loc:
    Central Kentucky
    He says " hey, I'm 67 years old and I have slept since then".. lol He is great guy.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page