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Building wood shed Clear polycarb panel roofing

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by d.braun28@yahoo.com, Feb 17, 2009.

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  1. d.braun28@yahoo.com

    d.braun28@yahoo.com New Member

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    Do you guys think using a clear poly roofing will be worth the extra cost?
    I am planing my wood storage suite and submitting my blueprint to the architectural review board for my sub division.
    It will be 23 ft long 5 ft deep and 6 ft tall in front sloping to 5ft in rear.
    The sides I will be hardieboard as to match my house and comply with the board.
    Front will be open and the rear will be lattice.

    I was going to use 3 x 5 pressure treated timbers for the base and the posts.
    I was going to dig the holes for the posts and fill them with concrete then use the metal anchor's used for decks. What Diameter hole and how deep?
    I was then going to use 2 x 4 16 oc North to south connected to the base 3 x 5 that are anchored to the posts
    What do you guys think ?

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  2. iskiatomic

    iskiatomic Minister of Fire

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    As most of my blueprints are pretty transparent and never finish the way they start. I say, go for it!
  3. gpcollen1

    gpcollen1 Minister of Fire

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    I would make it taller if possible. I am 6' and hitting your head is a groan.
  4. snj2k2se

    snj2k2se Member

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    I agree with CT, mine is 6' and it does hurt.

    The clear poly roof works well though
  5. zipper1081

    zipper1081 New Member

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    I wood make it deeper like 8 ft, 5ft dont give you a lot of room. Make it a foot taller than you are in the back & 2 foot taller than you in the front your head will thank you later. I wood go with what ever matches your house for the roof.

    I really feel for you guys that have to submitt blueprints to built anything. I wood go NUTS if I had to do that.
  6. TreePapa

    TreePapa Minister of Fire

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    How far apart are your posts gonna be? If they are not too far apart, you shouldn't really need studs 16" OC to hold lightweight lattice, esp. since the polycarb roof will also be lightweight.

    Since you submitting plans, see if the governing authority has any guidelines or requirements for the type of building you are building. Things like the depth of the foundation (i.e., the concrete for your posts) should be covered. It is preferable to know what the requirements are before drawing your plans; makes it more likely you'll only have to draw them once.

    Peace,
    - Sequoia
  7. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    Instead of posts, I would build stud walls on three sides. That way you can lean the wood against them and not have to cross-pile the ends.
  8. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    I don't think it makes much difference what you roof it with. It's ventilation that's important for seasoning (if that's what you're after), and protection from rain and snow/ice that are important for convenience in handling. I don't know where you live, so I've no idea what your snowload requirement is for roof construction. It has to be strong enough to withstand that, whatever it is. I built a shed, with a lot of help from my friends, that'll hold nearly 8 cords. Had to look nice, not to satisfy any architectural committe, but to satisfy me and my wife, as it sits pretty much right beside the house. The wood that goes into my shed has already seasoned outside elsewhere, so it just needs to stay nice and dry and snow/ice-free. Nonetheless, my shed is very well ventilated, from beneath and around all four sides. The roof is a standard built-up asphalt shingle deal. Rick

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  9. d.braun28@yahoo.com

    d.braun28@yahoo.com New Member

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    I don't need to pull a permit just submit to the board what it will look like.
    I want to build it taller as I am 6' 3" but also trying to lessen the impact it will have. That's why I was going to try to build it shorter and longer.
    They may tell me no and then they will have to look at my wood stacks and the big blue tarp over them during the winter months.
    I live outside of Chicago so snow is a factor but I also live in an open area with tons of wind so snow does not stick around for all that long before melting or getting blown into the ditches.
    I was unsure if sun was the most important for seasoning or wind/ventilation as I will be stacking into the shed green
  10. bsruther

    bsruther Minister of Fire

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    I agree with the other poster that you may want to make it a little deeper. I think a black roof would do just as much good as a translucent roof, whatever's cheapest.
  11. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    Stacking into the shed green...leave as much ventilation in the sides and the floor as you can, orient the shed to take advantage of your prevailing winds, roof doesn't really matter, plan to leave the wood in there stacked loosely for at least a year, maybe two, before you bring it out of the shed to burn. Depends on what kind of wood, of course, and a host of other factors. Rick
  12. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd Minister of Fire

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    No.
  13. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

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    If my greenhouse is any indicator, clear poly won't be clear poly for very long. If you are doing it for light, I would think translucent corrugated fiberglass roof panels would be more durable and maintain a nice appearance much longer. If you're doing it for heat/wood drying, I'd think a black roof and dark/black sides would turn the thing into a solar oven and bake your wood dry in short order...provided you have enough ventilation to carry the moisture away.
  14. d.braun28@yahoo.com

    d.braun28@yahoo.com New Member

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    I was thinking that clear poly panel would help with my dry time but if you guy think no then I will go the cheap route and get some shingles that match the house. I will just paint the inside with a black exterior paint.
    I was going to built it more like a lean to (open in the front and back) that will face south to catch all the sun and summer wind and blow right thru the stacks and out the back
  15. lexybird

    lexybird Minister of Fire

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    I doubt the clear panels will do anything to improve seasoning dry times .it makes sense .. but light isnt required for the process ,warm dry ventilation is.
    get a black roof and plenty of venting
  16. d.braun28@yahoo.com

    d.braun28@yahoo.com New Member

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    SO how deep and what Diameter have you guy done you supports?
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