Burning Weeping Willow

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by 12pack, Dec 8, 2012.

  1. jatoxico

    jatoxico
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2011
    Messages:
    2,717
    Likes Received:
    827
    Loc:
    Long Island NY
    Always heard that copper would do that but wasn't sure it was true. Maybe he said that in front of you boys for a reason but wanted to maintain his "plausible deniability" ;). You guys are crafty out there!
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
    tfdchief likes this.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. tfdchief

    tfdchief
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2009
    Messages:
    3,336
    Likes Received:
    1,295
    Loc:
    Tuscola, IL
    I am guessing you are right. And I have no idea whether copper nails really kill a tree or not, but that old Weeping Willow sure did die after we did it.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  3. jdp1152

    jdp1152
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2012
    Messages:
    781
    Likes Received:
    263
    Loc:
    Massachusetts
    Had the same issue with a white willow in my back yard. Sandy put the top third on my house. Paid to have it cut down due to proximity to the house. My boss was going to come get it, but has conveniently changed his mind. The tree crew was going to quarter it up and put it through the shredder. Now I've got probably two cords of it needing split and stacked.

     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  4. scotvl

    scotvl
    Expand Collapse
    Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2009
    Messages:
    168
    Likes Received:
    46
    Loc:
    southern ontario
    I scrounged a trailer full last year and after burning it I won't make that mistake again.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
    ScotO likes this.
  5. Kaptain

    Kaptain
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2011
    Messages:
    96
    Likes Received:
    17
    Loc:
    Central PA
    I've been burning willow this year and it does burns hotter than I expected but it does burn quick.

    It was free and already bucked so I took it. It's probably near impossible to split without hydrolics - every piece was like a big knot which also made it tough to stack.

    I wouldn't bother with it again but it's at least saving me from using my good stuff so far this year.
     
  6. fire_man

    fire_man
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2009
    Messages:
    1,851
    Likes Received:
    368
    Loc:
    North Eastern MA
    According the the Sweep's BTU table, Willow stacks up like this:

    Willow 14.2 MBTU/Cord
    Cottonwood 12.6 BTU/Chord
    Red Oak 22.1 MBTU/Cord

    I burned a ton of Cottonwood the past 3 years, it was a bittersweet experience.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  7. loadstarken

    loadstarken
    Expand Collapse
    Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2012
    Messages:
    229
    Likes Received:
    81
    Loc:
    Redmond, WA
    I have a neighbor that burns his willows, cottonwood and probably his garbage at night when it is harder to see the smoke. When I can't sleep and go for walks it is amazing how much smoke he is putting out!
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
    Applesister likes this.
  8. raprude

    raprude
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2012
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    3
    Loc:
    Ann Arbor, MI
    almost as good as box elder, cottonwood, or sassafras sticks- good kindling/great bon fire wood. Impress children with how big a piece you can lift. Logs between 4-8 inch diameter make great kites. It splits [shreds] like some elms .
     
  9. Augie

    Augie
    Expand Collapse
    Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2012
    Messages:
    468
    Likes Received:
    234
    Loc:
    North Of Canada
    Just wanted to update, Im low on seasoned wood with the latest cold snap here in SE Mich, so I split a piece again. 22%. All of the willow I have was CSS in September last year. With a hot fire this stuff is keeping the stove at 550 and the house at 78.... Gotta load a little more often... but whatever.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  10. ScotO

    ScotO
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    I burned it once a LONG time ago.....never ever again! It burns way too fast, leaves lots of ash, and smells like pizz when burning it. I give all of the willow I cut down away.......
     
  11. Augie

    Augie
    Expand Collapse
    Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2012
    Messages:
    468
    Likes Received:
    234
    Loc:
    North Of Canada
    Cant smell it from inside..... once a draft is started no smoke gets into the house when you open the door so it isn't an issue what it smells like!lol
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  12. ScotO

    ScotO
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Apparently you don't have neighbors......
     
  13. Augie

    Augie
    Expand Collapse
    Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2012
    Messages:
    468
    Likes Received:
    234
    Loc:
    North Of Canada
    Actually I do, this is kind of how I feel.
    Skip to 38seconds



    Hes not me and I know its a horrible thing to do but I need to stay warm and he isnt me..... ;)
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  14. ScotO

    ScotO
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Well, most of my neighbors are family (brother, mother and dad, cousin, uncle), and the ones who aren't I get along with like family.....I wouldn't do something like that to them.

    I got waaay too much other better wood to keep than willow.......it's just downright rude to burn it in a neighborhood IMO.....
    The guy I sell my willow to uses it in an OWB, he lives on a lonely back road and most of his neighbors don't like him anyway....:p. I pass his house on the way to work, and it smells like piss several from miles away on the mornings when he's burning it. ;sick
     
  15. Augie

    Augie
    Expand Collapse
    Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2012
    Messages:
    468
    Likes Received:
    234
    Loc:
    North Of Canada
    Im going to hazard a guess that there is a difference between a OWB and a Secondary or a cat burning at optimal or close to in terms of smell.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  16. ScotO

    ScotO
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Not sure, and I don't care to find out. I'm sure if you split small to medium and let it season really well, that it would probably not present as bad of a stink issue. But pound for pound, I feel it is a waste of space to stack and season that wood. For the same amount of processing and storage I can be getting maple, ash, oak, locust, walnut, cherry, hickory........I don't bother with willow at all anymore.....
     
  17. BobUrban

    BobUrban
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2010
    Messages:
    1,902
    Likes Received:
    1,110
    Loc:
    Central Michigan
    Works great for bow and drill fire making. In survival school it was one of the woods that I could get a fire going easily with - likely due to it being ultra light and fast burning???
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
    ScotO likes this.
  18. ScotO

    ScotO
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    I may have to save a couple chunks for that. I made fireboards out of poplar, elm, walnut, norway maple, and oak......none of them impressed me. I've made drills out of locust, norway maple, poplar, walnut.....none of them impressed me. I did get some fires going using the maple drill and an elm fireboard, but it was hard to get a coal! I'll have to make some out of willow this year....
     
  19. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2011
    Messages:
    1,789
    Likes Received:
    342
    Loc:
    WNY
    We scrounged some, it is ashy but burns fine. We just burn when they're running the ole honey wagon on the fields across the way (spreading manure from the farm down the road). If it smells, you'd never smell it specifically outside of that smell!
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  20. Applesister

    Applesister
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2012
    Messages:
    2,483
    Likes Received:
    954
    Loc:
    Upstate NY
    This is one scrounge wood that even when its free isnt really worth it. Weeping willow is not a native species.
    The others mentioned I feel differently about. Poplar is SO easy to process that it makes up for its low BTUs. It fills in the gaps between those really nice firewood species that Im not so lucky to always come by.
     
  21. tfdchief

    tfdchief
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2009
    Messages:
    3,336
    Likes Received:
    1,295
    Loc:
    Tuscola, IL
    Propane torch Scotty;lol
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature

Share This Page

Entire Site copyright © 1995-2016 - email to webinfo@hearth.com
Hearth.com and HearthNet are property and trademarks of Hearth.com LLC Advertising Information