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Can you help ID my new to me REBA WASHINGTON?

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by Mohawk Dave, Nov 17, 2013.

  1. Mohawk Dave

    Mohawk Dave New Member

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    Hello all,

    Newbie here. I've been lurking for a couple weeks reading and learning. Great info, great crowd.

    Background: I have a workshop outback, 10'x30', single wall metal walls and roof-16ga, and a plywood floor. It drops into the 20°s here, and my dog doesn't like being cold. lol. I will be placing the stove on a rather large brick hearth for safety reasons of course.

    So, I have picked up a small stove, "Reba Washington No. 116", and I can not find any info on it online. I restore/use old American made tools, and do not see "Made in USA" on this stove, which surprised me a little. All parts are cast and stamped "RW 116". The hardware that holds the top to the sides and then bottom are long pieces of ≈5/16" allthread, which I would assume might date this more recent. (I paid $60, did I do good? I think/hope so....)

    There are 2 doors on the face. The top opens to the 'firebox' and the bottom to the 'coal area'. The top has Mica windows, the lower does not. Should it? I would assume no, as this is where the draft comes from...???

    So, my questions are; Why does it have 2 doors on the face and is there a name for this type, dating it, COO, history, fast facts, nicknames for this type, and any other relevant info.

    Also, when I get it in the shop tomorrow, is there anything I need to do special? I've read about break in, but, since this is used that won't apply, correct? Anything else?

    Thanks, MD

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Nov 17, 2013

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  2. Motor7

    Motor7 Feeling the Heat

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    Welcome, looks US or Canada made from the 30-40's, but that just a WAG. Check all door seals and make sure it seals up tight. I would install a flue damper when you put up your flue since most real old stoves leak a lot of air and the flue damper helps retain some heat and is a good way to safely slow down a potential runaway.
  3. Mohawk Dave

    Mohawk Dave New Member

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    Motor7,

    Thanks for the reply! If I get a flue damper that is just the round disc, can I install it in my 6" tube going up? And how far up from the stove should it be?

    Also, reading on here, it appears that 6-700 degrees is optimal. Is that what I should be expecting from this stove?

    And do I need to get Mica for the bottom door, or is does that stay open for draft?

    Thanks, MD
  4. Motor7

    Motor7 Feeling the Heat

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    East TN.
    the damper can go just about any height above the stove. On my shop stove I pit it right in the stoves flue collar right on top.

    I don't think there should be any intake openings that are not controllable, so yes I would get soem Mica in there. Does it have any adjustment for the intake of air?
  5. Mohawk Dave

    Mohawk Dave New Member

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    ok Motor7,

    I ordered a nice old USA made THE ADAMS CO 6" flue damper from the bay. http://www.ebay.com/itm/251369625185?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649

    Also, one of the small pieces goes on the backside of the lower front door. It slides L to R allowing air to draft through the door holes. So, that is the adjustment. I must now buy a chrome coil handle that matches the existing. Like here...http://www.amazon.com/SBI-Wood-Stov...1384761378&sr=8-2&keywords=chrome coil handle

    And there is no gaskets of any sort on this. The seal is controlled by how tight the latch is adjusted. Is this odd, or on par with the age of the stove?

    Thanks for your help. I appreciate it.

    Respectfully, MD $T2eC16dHJHQFFhYynl71BR5,)9j0mw~~60_57.JPG 41TsBDa2iZL.jpg
  6. Motor7

    Motor7 Feeling the Heat

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    East TN.
    You're on the right track. Try the dollar bill thing, stick one half in & close the door(on a cold stove;) ) on it & tighten it as if you were running a burn. Then gently try and pull the dollar out & do this on several places on the door. If you get resistance, you're probably ok. If it has no resistance, then your stove will have a pretty good air leak. With stoves that old, I don't think air leaks were a big priority, so yes, plug any hole that is not supposed to adjust incoming air. All this will be fine on a shop stove....my shop is a quonset hut, 30x36 and uninsulated & my old Buck copy does a pretty good job of making it a comfortable working place when it's below freezing.
  7. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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  8. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    Top left photo looks like a coal banking plate on the floor.
    Is there a shaker handle or place to put one on the moveable grate?
    The air leak around the upper door is probably the secondary air for oxygen to get to the coal gas above the fire bed burning coal. The side door is for wood loading, but primarily a coal stove.
    You did extremely well for 60 bucks.
  9. Mohawk Dave

    Mohawk Dave New Member

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    Hey guys,

    Thanks for the info!

    Webbie, HOLY COW! I'm diggin' this stove more and more. What an interesting and intriguing addiction this will become! (BTW, whatever this forum format is, I LOVE it. It is the most user friendly forum I've been on. Love the attachments and the way they show up.)

    Coaly, please forgive my ignorance. Can you direct me to a read up or info on coal banking plates, how to etc. I am not familiar with them. I shall google as well. Where does this plate go? It has the RW16 on it, but it does not seem to readily fit anywhere, but alas, it must.

    I googled Shaker Handle. The grate does have a place for a shaker handle. So, I need to get one of those also.

    So a shaker handle shakes the grate that holds the coals to liven it up? EDIT: read here...http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/...can-i-replace-the-gasket.117674/#post-1575994

    Sounds like I need to read up on coal stoves. I did not know and thought this was a wood burner.

    Also, the stove exhaust is oval. An oval that is fully round, (without parallel length-sides). It's circumference is 16+". Where can I locate an adapter from that to ultimately 6" round?

    I took pictures of the parts I can not place inside due to lack of knowledge. Can you explain what they are and where they go?

    Sorry for all the questions, and thank you for sharing your knowledge everyone. It is appreciated.

    -MD

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Nov 23, 2013
  10. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    I'll give you a lot of basic info here to prevent a lot of searching and get you going;

    Wood burns from getting oxygen from any direction. Coal requires oxygen to come up through the pile (coal bed) from the bottom. (or down through the top depending on direction of air flow through burner design - yours would be bottom up) You "can" burn wood in any coal stove, but it's going to get so much air it will burn fast and hot. The coals drop into the ash pan and go out. Burning wood on a bed of ash slows it down, allows coals to form a pile and extend burn time. You can't burn coal in a woodstove since there is no provision for air to enter below the fire and come up through the "floor" you burn on.

    "Grate" is the bottom pieces that have holes or slots large enough for air to feed the fire, but small enough to prevent the coal from falling through. That's why coal is sold by different sizes. Buckwheat is very fine and only used in auto feed types like a pellet stove would burn. From small to large is Pea, Chestnut, Stove. The larger the piece, the more air between the pieces and the faster it will burn. all sizes have the same BTU per pound, just a different rate of burn. Use the size that won't fall through your grates. Probably Chestnut. If the grates remove easily, take one to the coal yard and see what will sit on it without falling through.

    The two shield like pieces in your top left photo are combustion chamber "liners" designed to keep the intense heat from damaging the outer walls of the stove. Newer stoves use firebrick which is cheap and easy to replace. The piece that looks like a large comb, is the banking plate. Like the bank of a river, it keeps the coal from spilling out the door. It should fit across the front and the slots would face down. The top edge would be straight across the door opening making a front wall to hold the coal pile to the top when full. This would be the total depth of the deepest coal fire it will hold. Adding coal on the established fire is called "stoking" so this is a "stoked" stove compared to a gravity fed hopper type stove.

    Coal will not flame or smoke like wood. Since most oxygen is consumed going through the firebed, adding oxygen above the glowing mass allows coal gas that escapes from fresh coal on top to mix with air to burn. This adds more BTU to the stove output as well. So most coal stoves have a secondary air inlet like a small air intake above the grate to allow air to get to the top of fire. Yours would use the slots in the banking plate for air to bypass the fire, rush up the banking plate between the plate and door (cooling door and windows) and allow the coal gas to burn with a blue flame at the top of the coal bed.

    You only rock the grate slightly, but forcefully to knock the ash through the holes. Rocking it too far can dump the fire over the edges and most are designed to actually dump the fire in case of emergency into the pan. So short quick strokes work best. It will go out in the ash pan since air can no longer go through it. Each stove shakes differently and you have to get the feel of how it removes the ash the best without allowing a lot of the burning coals to drop through. Stop shaking as the red glowing coals start to drop. Years ago (depression times) the wasted coal that dropped into the pan would be sifted from the cold ashes and reused.
    Never poke or disturb a coal fire from the top. Pokers are for going up through the bottom to open any dead spots shaking may not clean. You will be able to tell a clean fire looking at the bottom of grate by the glow through the slots.

    Start with small kindling pieces and add coal slowly on top as it gets going. No big chunks of wood. You want a hard burning fire like a torch up through the coal. Wide open air inlets through bottom. always close the door to force all air the chimney draws in to go up through the coal. This is where a leaky older stove makes it more difficult than a sealed airtight modern stove. It should establish a fire from match to coal catching in about 15 minutes. Your first attempts may take much longer until you get the hang of it. It's strange to dump cold black coal on the fire covering it, but the red glowing mass will burn up through the coal pile and flicks of blue flame will be seen on top of the black coal. The more air, the larger these flames and the more heat.

    #1 Most important rule is to dump ash daily to prevent ash from filling up to bottom of grate. Air coming up through the grates cools them, and without air flow they will glow red, sag, and melt.

    You should not use a manual damper since you could close it off too much, loose the heat needed to ignite coal gas and allow it to leak the gas into the living space. Barometric dampers are used for better control of air through the stove to control burn rate and cannot close the flue fully like a manual damper.

    #1 Safety rule ; ALWAYS have a CO detector in operation with a coal stove in operation. (a very good idea with burning ANY fossil fuel)

    Oval adapters are available at Ace Hardware if you have one near you. Normally 6,7,and 8 inch.

    This website for coal burners will help since you now have the basics;
    http://nepacrossroads.com/ I started there as Coaly and posted some Fisher information years ago as questions were asked. Realizing the amount of information needed for the stove brand, I chose this website. So questions there about most wood stoves are directed here, and vice versa.

    A "Coaly" on a steam train is the fireman in charge of the fire. I was a steam mechanic and enjoyed firing as well, hence my screen name. My hobby then became antique traction engines, road rollers, and stationary steam engines. (along with antique stoves) So it was natural to heat my home with it in modern stoves as well.
  11. Mohawk Dave

    Mohawk Dave New Member

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    Coaly,

    Thank you so much! I can see clearly now how the process works for coal burning. I appreciate you taking your time to write that up. I will get an oval adapter at Ace and hopefully have the stove up and going in the next 3 days. I have to move some tool boxes around the shop and clear an area for the stove.

    Where can I buy coal out here in Southern California? Some websites say Home Depot and Walmart, and I will check Ace as well.

    I also have access to a cord or two of Eucalyptus. Any thoughts on me burning this as it is free?

    Here's a dated picture of my shop. I will place the stove about 1/3 of the way in to the wall on the left. There will be no combustibles w/in 8 or 10 feet.

    Thanks, MD

    Attached Files:

  12. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    Dealers sell it cheaper in bulk by the ton here. They also bag it for a higher price. No idea out there.
    Try a search of Eucalyptus with the search feature at the top of the page for results about burning it.

    I don't see a chimney in your shop. Please tell me you're not going to run stove pipe out the wall and up with no chimney.
  13. Mohawk Dave

    Mohawk Dave New Member

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    LOL, No Sir. I lucked out and found a 9.5' foot 6" section with spark arrestor on it at a yard sale last weekend that the lady used on her wood burner. I just got an adapter and another 30" x 6"section on the way home. I'm going from a 5" oval at the stove to 6" straight duct out the roof. Is this ok?

    BTW, what is safer; single wall or dual wall duct? Single would give off more heat, correct? As mine is galvanized, is there any problem with painting it black with Rustoleum BBQ spray paint?

    Thanks again, MD
  14. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    No galvanized inside. It is toxic as it smokes off. Connector pipe will already be painted black.
    Duct pipe is not the same as single wall connector pipe for the connection from stove to chimney. Connector pipe needs to be 24 ga. minimum.
    Single wall will radiate more heat, yes. Double wall is used when you have less than 18" clearance from the single wall pipe to a combustable. Double wall can be used down to 6" clearance.

    Double wall pipe and insulated chimney makes the most draft, and you will need all you can get.

    The benefit using double wall when you don't really need it is that it doesn't loose as much heat before getting into the chimney. Therefore you have a higher temperature exhaust going up the chimney and can save fuel by allowing less heat up the chimney keeping the same draft. In the case of coal, the chimney draft is what causes the intake air to be pushed up through the fire bed making it burn. On warmer days from 40 to 50* there is not enough temperature differential inside and outside the chimney to sustain the draft needed for a coal fire. The stove has a lot to do with how much draft is needed. A newer air tight stove will only allow air through the firebed on it's way through the stove. Your antique is going to leak at joints and doors, so every air leak into the stove is less air through the fire as these leaks allow barometric air pressure to equalize the low pressure area inside the stove. (created by the chimney) The air that leaks into the stove in your case with coal doesn't add to combustion like wood could use it, so it goes up the chimney cooling it even more, reducing draft. Less draft = less air through fire. So your stove will be sluggish and not be able to burn hard on warm days no matter what you do. Making the chimney stronger using double wall can help somewhat. Probably not worth the expense.

    Also use 3 short screws at each connector pipe joint.
  15. abkissa

    abkissa New Member

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    My good fortune! I found a Reba Washington stove No. 118 a few years ago, and was looking around the web for any info about it. Mine has the mica on the 5 little windows of the upper door, missing mica in the upper 3. I have been burning it in my home for the last 3 years or so with out it, and have had no issues at all. (I would replace all of the mica, if I could find it inexpensively).

    This little stove REALLY heats up the room! As stated in one of the articles above, there is some leakage of smoke in the doors if not closed tightly. The bottom door on the face of the stove slides open, to control the intake of oxygen for burning.

    Mohawk Dave's stove is prettier. Mine is all black(needs to be cleaned ? or has been painted?) where his has some metal on it. I found mine at a swap meet for $50. I found the oval double walled pipe at Lowes.

    I saw in one of the photos the "Bud light" box...hahaha where mine is Coors light.

    I'm very glad to have found this sight, thanks for the conversations!

    Abkissa
  16. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    Welcome to the forum; Mica isn't expensive. It is available in different grades pertaining to the clearness. Clear being the most expensive. Without it in place, it will gets lots of air and burn fast, get far too hot, but burn clean. Try Woodman's Associates; http://www.woodmanspartsplus.com/4846/Stove-Mica-and-Glass.html

    The shiny parts are nickel plated, (before chrome) so yours were probably getting rusty and was painted over. OR there is nice nickel plating under the paint. You could wipe the paint off with lacquer thinner to see what's under it.

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