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Ceiling Fan Questions

Post in 'The Green Room' started by njtomatoguy, Jul 15, 2006.

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  1. njtomatoguy

    njtomatoguy Feeling the Heat

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    I am taking the plunge and putting in a stove, also wanted to maximize air circulation, so I bought a good ceiling fan-- Hunter, lifetime guarentee, 5 Blade,4 light/ super whisper quiet motor etc.. originally 189.99/marked down to 110.00/ I paid 18.00-90% off-- I was at the right place at the right time- Brand new/never opened box--

    Now the hard part-- It is heavy-- When I bought this house 6 yrs ago, I got a cheapy ceiling fan, and put it in.. It wobbled and buzzed and basically fell apart in the air-- I have since been told to use a special "between the studs" box that slides in the hole, and screws open to make a stronger support.. Does any have any experience with this kind of thing?

    Also, my house is a ranch, so no attic- the electrician asked me about that.. I may just bite the bullet and pay him to do it

    Thanks

    Bob

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  2. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    You must have a vaulted ceiling, because most ranch houses have some kind of accesible space.

    I put one in my sons room last year and the instructions clearly said you CANNOT hang it from a regular ceiling box without extra bracing. So I went up into the attic and framed some bracing so the fan would not fall!

    I installed mine where a light already existed, which made it easier.

    If you have to run the wire/switch and also support it, and you have no attic - well, I might use some of that money saved to get an electrician. My guess is that it might cost you $300 or so if you need all of it done.
  3. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Your fan has to be installed in a code compliant ceiling fan box anchored correctly.
    You do not want to be in a big dig situation where things are falling from the ceiling

    I assume you have checked the load on the curcuit as biger fan = larger motor more demand for electricity
    plus 4 more lights
  4. njtomatoguy

    njtomatoguy Feeling the Heat

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    Craig- yes, it is a vaulted ceiling- sorry, forgot to mention it.

    Elk. It is going to replace th kitchen light fixture, and for some reason the outside wall of the house is one circuit, and the inside wall, including the kitchen light is anothercircuit, which is just the kitchen light/ an outlet over the stove(which I never use,, and the medicine cabinet/combo light in the bathroom) so the load should be fine..
  5. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    I used one for my fan in the shop and it works great. I have another one that I am going to use for a fan in another room when I get around to installing it.

    The ones I have are rated up to sixty pounds and have UL code compliant boxes on them.
  6. Sandor

    Sandor Minister of Fire

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    Bob, have you actually took the old fan down and looked up to see what you have?

    You can remove the box and take a look. Just because the old fan wobbled itself to pieces, does not mean that you dont have what you need. Matter of fact, you may be in good shape if that out of balance fan did not tear the box down.
  7. saichele

    saichele Minister of Fire

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    I used one of the 'between the studs' boxes from Home Cheapo and it worked great. I was replacing an old ceiling fixture so I had a nice big opening to work with - it would ahve been a lot tougher with just a box sized opening.

    The apparatus is basically like those old doorway chinup bars - a rod that threads out of a tube, and little teeth on each end.

    Steve
  8. njtomatoguy

    njtomatoguy Feeling the Heat

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    Thanks for the replies-- That screw out bar/box is the ticket, and if nee be, I can open the hole a little, because that part of the fan is big, or I was thinking one of those decorative plates on the ceiling.. The got one price for the install, about 175-- I am probably going to try it myself..
  9. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Say 60 bulky lbs standing on a ladder trying to wire nut wires first, then finally getting it in position to bolt it into the box, is quite a juggeling act. Sounds to me like a 2 man job. One other caution I would never trust those wire nuts to hold that fan in place, while I try to reach for the fastening screws or bolts
  10. saichele

    saichele Minister of Fire

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    For 175 I'd do it myself. Although I was surprised by how much the screw-out bar with box arrangement was - $18 I think. Must be the only thing not made in China.

    With a little luck, the fan you got is the kind with a hook on the mounting plate to hang the works while you make up the connections. Otherwise I recommend a little mechanics wire. Definitely a tough deal to hold the fan and make up the wires, and two people on two ladders working one fan is no picnic either.

    Steve
  11. njtomatoguy

    njtomatoguy Feeling the Heat

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    The jugglig act is right! The first fan I put up involved me(5'5,200 lbs) on a crappy aluminum ladder, and my ex(5'11,140) standing on a kitchen chair,her screaming that it was too heavy, her kid complaining it was hot and no TV, so I guess it was a less than perfect installation...(I wish I had a video)

    This one will be installed by a UNION electrician, and myself in exchange for steak and beer-- he has a wife and three kids-mumbling about needing a break- said it would probably take us about 2 hrs, but told his wife it would be a bit longer-- I'm going to help him put in a vanity in his kids bathroom ..
  12. saichele

    saichele Minister of Fire

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    I'd be surprised if it took 2 hrs. Almost as surprised as I am to find a union electrician willing to work off scale. Seems like a crime against his brotherhood.

    Steve
  13. njtomatoguy

    njtomatoguy Feeling the Heat

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    Steve, I'd never step on any toes with a union- I mentioned union referring to the fact that he was a professional, and completed his schooling-- here in nj- a union electrician or a union plumber MUST complete a specific training progranm with passing grades. electrician is 4 yrs, plumber is 5

    He is actually a good friend.. and I am going to help him with a vanity install--

    Thanks for the reply..

    Bob
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