Cherry?

bluedogz Posted By bluedogz, Nov 3, 2013 at 9:30 AM

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  1. bluedogz

    bluedogz
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    Oct 9, 2011
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    = less heat, more ash?

    Half loads of 18-month-CSS cherry bringing stovetop to 450, so it works for now, but box is FULL of ash.
     
  2. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover
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    I haven't come to a decision yet weather there is a real difference between ash amounts. Some say Poplar (Tulip?) is ashy but others say the ash is mostly air and can be mashed down with a shovel. I'll have to burn a full load of Cherry and check it out. Not too big a deal for me in any case, as I have a ash system with a grate, and dealing with ashes is clean and easy.
     
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  3. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz
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    Nov 3, 2006
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    Cherry is a medium heat, high ash wood. Smells great while the door is open.
    The ash does pack down easily with the backside of an ash shovel.
    I wouldn't through the cherry away, but I did tell my wood guy try not to bring a lot of cherry next time.
    I also try and load the cherry on the bottom, so the ashes don't interfere with the burning of the wood below.
     
  4. Paulywalnut

    Paulywalnut
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    I find that the fruit woods leave a lot of very light ash. Not really a problem. Most don't burn all cherry anyway. Good mixing wood.
     
  5. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage
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    Feb 14, 2007
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    Ash is just one byproduct of burning wood. I've never considered the amount of ash one wood will give when I cut the tree. If the tree needs cutting, it comes down and it gets burned in the stove. I've even burned a good amount of popple and lots of folks won't because it gives so much ash. That is foolish.

    As for the cherry, burn it. It burns nicely especially in this time of the year.
     
  6. Applesister

    Applesister
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    Dec 5, 2012
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    I burn alot of Black Cherry and no ash whatsoever. Not that it matters. I love cherry. It must be how seasoned it is or differences in stoves.
    I have a fireview stove and cherry has always proven to be very clean burning. My trees are cut from hedgerows and open fields, they arent dense woodlot trees.
    Aspen and sugar maple are the heavy ash producers for me.
     
  7. bluedogz

    bluedogz
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    Oct 9, 2011
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    That has me curious... this is all black cherry growing naturally on my property, and it's leaving a high volume of fluffy ash.
     
  8. My Oslo heats my home

    My Oslo heats my home
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    Sep 20, 2010
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    You are correct, it does give the appearance of more ash but what I have seen with my black cherry and have been told by others is that the ash is less dense than some of the other woods' ash.
    Meaning, the ash amounts may be the same but the BC ash is a bit more powdery and "shows" more volume than it actually is.
     
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