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  1. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    14,738
    Loc:
    Northern IL
    Yes I do - and Yes it works. AND it can be done from the bottom up - no climbing on the roof.
    It sounds like you are on the correct path. Make sure your "burn indicator" has actual temps on it. When you get them installed, report back on your peak temp and run temp (when everything settles down for the long haul). The group here will get you on a "best practices" cycle and get you back to heating - and hopefully much safer.
    PapaDave likes this.

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  2. Sprinter

    Sprinter Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2012
    Messages:
    1,889
    Loc:
    SW Washington
    If you have a flue damper, you probably will want to always keep that fully open. If you don't have a problem with excessive draft, you don't need it. If that's ever closed down, that could contribute to the problem. When you talked about having to keep the "air" turned up, did you mean the flue damper or the air supply? I may have misread an earlier post.

    Agree about the SootEater. That will work well for you. Except the material has to be fairly loose. If it's baked-on hard stage 3 creosote, that would be more of a challenge.

    All the 2-pin type moisture meters work about the same. You could get one for 15 or 20 on line, but you may want to get one right away at the store. Harbor Freight has one for about $13 if you have one nearby. People here who have them like them.

    Correct. The rule of thumb is that internal temps are double that of the surface.
    PapaDave and Jags like this.
  3. Redcloud5400

    Redcloud5400 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2013
    Messages:
    21
    Loc:
    USA
    So while we're on the topic of flue buildup, moisture content, burn temperature and even rate of burn...the thoughts of a colder fire or slow burn came up. What is the real driver for creosote/flue buildup...setting pine aside...and I realize its probably not any one operating condition...
    1) is it moisture content as the largest driving factor?
    2) is it a slow burn?
    3) is it a combination of both?

    Is a slow burn with seasoned wood that is 18% or less in moisture content ok?

    Is the phenomenon of flue build up the solids precipitating out of the smoke due to temp change as you move up the stack? i.e. moisture working its way out, lower temp is slower stack/smoke/emissions velocity...seems to be all three.

    What's been the seasoned vets experience?
    In my mind a slow burn with seasoned and dry wood is ok.
  4. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    27,632
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    I don't know how you could ever burn an old Franklin style too slow. I had one in 1977 and it is a leaking fast burning scare box. Mine was "professionally" installed and when we moved I went into the attic to bring down some stuff and crawled over to the pipe. The attic joists on all sides of the pipe were charred. My knees were shaking when I came back down thinking about how many nights I went to bed with that thing burning.

    And the oldest wood I probably ever burned in it was probably a month off the stump.

    Best way to burn the thing is as an open fireplace with a screen in front of the open doors.
    Redcloud5400 likes this.
  5. tsquini

    tsquini Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2009
    Messages:
    520
    Loc:
    North Shore, MA
    We used a Franklin in a camp for many years. What you say is true. It is better to yes it more like a fireplace. The flue pipe would be tinging and cracking from the heat.
    Redcloud5400 likes this.
  6. Redcloud5400

    Redcloud5400 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2013
    Messages:
    21
    Loc:
    USA
    So true, and I've only fired it once. This is again installed in my shop and will only be fired when I am in it, and will only be left unattended when I can safely touch the outside of the stove. I can see how easy this stove could be overloaded, and I am just amazed at how fast the flue temps climb.

    My apologies for the questions in this post...they seem out of place given the style of the OP's stove. Just learning is all...you guys are awesome--so much to glean from your replies.

    FWIW, at the first firing I never loaded it more than the base of the door, and was hitting flue temps measured from the outside of 430 deg F which I believe would be approaching the limits?

    So I wont say I should never worry about creosote build up in my chimney but its less likely given that a Franklin Style burn fast and hot.
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2013

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