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Chimney sizing

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by TStreet, Feb 9, 2008.

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  1. TStreet

    TStreet New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Messages:
    4
    Loc:
    Southern Indiana
    I am thinking of installing a small wood furnace in the basement of my single story home and plumbing it into the houses ductwork and puting the blower on a upper floor level thermostat. I used this wood stove in my polebarn at the old place and it worked well. It was built at an amish metal shop and is very heavily and well built. The fire box is 12 inches wide, 24 inches long, and about 18 inches high. The fire brick is 9 1/2 inches tall. The question is can I use a 6 inch chimney? The collar is 8 inches but I feel this is overkill. They are not instructions with the stove. It is about 10-15 years old. It is made of about 3/16 inch steel, inside and outside jacket both. The firebox is about the same size as other stoves I see at Rural King, and they use 6 inch. What do you guys think?
    I am planning on the Dura Vent insulated chimney system and run it inside of the house peremeter. Thank you, Terry

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  2. laynes69

    laynes69 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2006
    Messages:
    1,830
    Loc:
    Ashland OH
    I would say if you can do it, look for better technology for a new wood furnace. I won't bash the amish, but dad had a stove that he said heated well, its not made very well and is a smoke dragon. I have seen alot of their wood furnaces and stoves, for we have some dealers around us. They aren't the best at building a add-on like you are talking about. Its not been tested, and has the potential for an unsafe usage. If you could, look into the epa wood furnaces, less wood, more heat, and they install in series with the current system. If you are getting a new chimney, then look into a new furnace. Plus they burn very clean. I would opt out of installing an amish built woodfurnace in with your ductwork, unless its a company like hitzer, and not a family owned business.
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