Cider time

Post in 'The Inglenook' started by begreen, Oct 11, 2013.

  1. begreen

    begreen
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    Got a new toy, a new cider press. It's very compact and works great. We pressed 150 lbs of apples and got 6.5 gallons of deliciousness. The neighbors kids helped a little with picking and the pressing.
    IMG_1679web.jpg IMG_1680web.jpg IMG_1681web.jpg

    Time to get this stuff fermenting!
     
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  2. JOHN BOY

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    Begreen ..do you have to add anything to the mix ..? Looks yummy
     
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  3. begreen

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    No, as a cider it is delicious due to the apples used. Most of this is heading to hard cider land though.
     
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  4. 1750

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    That looks like great fun.

    Will you add a commercial yeast to it, or does this process rely on wild yeast?
     
  5. fbelec

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    one more question. does it matter what type apple is used?
     
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  6. begreen

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    I use commercial yeast. Last year I used champagne yeast with good success. Pen did up a batch with just the natural yeast last year.

    The type of apples do matter if you are fussy and want to get a full flavored cider. This is more important with fermented hard cider than with sweet cider. For sweet cider a blend of good eating apples is fine. For alcholic cider it is recommended to add a lot of what most folks would pass on for eating apples. That said we used King and Shay last year and it was great. Our cider turned out very dry and light, much like a Prosecco. This year I added a bunch of Winter Banana apples which I hope will add a richer apple flavor. We'll see.
     
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  7. Backwoods Savage

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    Most of the time for cider it is best to use a mix of different type of apples. Tomorrow we plan on making some more and will be using 4 different types of apples. I swear this will be the last time for cider making this year!

    Begreen, I like the looks of that press.
     
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  8. Paulywalnut

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    Nice press Begreen. I've seen it done many times and drink cider, never hard cider though. Lots of people around here make their own.
     
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  9. Shari

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    Mmmmmmmmmmmm.... sweet cider. Yummm.......

    We happen to have a fairly well known apple orchard in our area:

    http://www.westonapples.com/hist.htm

    Here's a clip from their website: "The family-operated orchards have supplied the public with historic apple varieties for over 60 years. Some of the orchards' trees were planted in the late nineteenth century and significant additional plantings were made during the Great Depression by the orchards current owners. The orchards cover 16 acres with more than 700 trees and over 100 varieties with dates varying from the Calville Blanc d'Hiver (1598), Gravenstien (1600) to the Wolf River (1881) and Pink Pearl (1944). Weston's Orchards work to conserve these antique apple vaieties from extinction. The Old Church apple, for example, is grown solely on their farm."
     
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  10. begreen

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  11. Todd 2

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    That is really neat BG, I do like that new toy. Just brought home some fresh made apple butter from the festival down the road today, also two loaves of wood fired brick oven bread, good stuff !
     
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  12. 1750

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    I'm impressed by the yield. 150 #s of applies nets over 50 #s of cider!

    Is there a use, other than good composting, for 100 # of squashed apple remains?
     
  13. Backwoods Savage

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    Yes. Feed them to the deer.


    We made 8 1/2 gallons today. Much better as it was cooler weather but the bees were just as plentiful.
     
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  14. begreen

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    Yes, it uses hydraulics for up to 6000# of force. This is much easier, faster and more efficient than the crank presses. Great for an old geezer making cider. The apple pancake that comes out of the press is almost dry. The whole rig breaks down easily and hangs on the garage wall.
     
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  15. 1750

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    That sounds delicious, Backwoods! Does it store well? Or, maybe you are going to make it into hard cider?

    Is this press commercially available? Or, is it something you fabricated yourself? (If you bought it, I'd love to see a link and read more about it.)
     
  16. begreen

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    It was #2 in production made by a local fruit club member. I don't think he is ready to go commercial but will ask.
     
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  17. 1750

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    No worries. There are probably similar things available commercially (I haven't done any research). It just looked very compact and easy to manage, and I thought it might be a good place to start.

    A good hard cider is very refreshing. Enjoy!
     
  18. Jags

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    And a motorized grinder. Smart man...
     
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  19. webbie

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    Damn stuff binds me up something fierce!
    o_O

    But it's hard to resist. [​IMG]

    Back in Jersey we had a local orchard named Jersey Jerrys. They made the very best cider I've ever tasted. It was so thick that it seemed like syrup. They had a large store which was all "honor". You walked through and picked up what you wanted and there was a machine - like in a bus or trolley - where you dropped your cash.

    For those who wonder about those famous bind u up qualities, apples have large amounts of pectin in them....which is what they use for making jelly harden. Oh, getting too graphic here.....
     
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  20. begreen

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    Never had that issue. It gives new meaning to the phrase 'jelly belly'.
     
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  21. Treacherous

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    That really does look awesome and the cider sounds very tasty!!!
     
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  22. begreen

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    The cider turned out exceptional. We have very sweet juicy apples. Ironically that is not the best for hard cider so I bought some locally pressed, much more tart cider to mix in with it.
     
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  23. Backwoods Savage

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    It can store really well and is easy to do. If you want to keep it from turning in the refrigerator, just leave the caps a bit loose. That will keep it from turning for some time but can't really tell you how long. Ours doesn't last that long. Or you can also freeze it. Naturally you don't want the containers full but a bit over 3/4 full. Again, leave the caps loose. It will freeze up so you can have cider for Christmas or even later.

    It can also be canned.

    Get cider fresh from the mill. To prepare, strain it through a clean, dampened jelly bag. Pour into a large kettle and bring to a good simmer at 200 degrees F. but do not boil.

    Hot Pack Only--in Jars.

    Pour strained fresh (and hot) cider into clean sterilized jars, leaving 1/4 inch of headroom; adjust lids. Process in a Hot-Water Bath at 190 degrees F. for 30 minutes for either pints or quarts. Remove jars and complete seal if necessary. Enjoy cider all winter when chilled again in refrigerator.

    Recipe from Putting Food By printed by Bantam Books, 1979 and assembled by Ruth Hertzberg/Beatrice Vaughan/Janet Greene
     
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  24. 1750

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    Thanks for the great recipe, Backwoods! I've never canned, but this might be the opportunity I've been waiting for.

    I brew quite a bit of beer, but have never tried a hard cider. I was surprised by how dry and delicious they can be. This might be next on my list of things to do.
     
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  25. begreen

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    Our hard apple cider is much like a Prosecco, but a bit less alcoholic. It'll keep for over a year, but I bet it doesn't last that long.
     
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