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Cleaning out the stove-surface rust?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by eclecticcottage, Jul 22, 2013.

  1. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage Minister of Fire

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    Dh called, he's doing the deep cleaning (a little late but it's been a crazy year) and he found a bit of surface rust starting behind the bricks. What's the best course of action here? I can't imagine many hi-temp paints could really stand up to interior stove temps. We'll at least hit it with a wire brush, but is there anything we can coat it with after that? I'm not home to take a look or take pics, I can do that later this evening if it helps. This is in the Republic (2 burn seasons old).

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  2. clemsonfor

    clemsonfor Minister of Fire

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    I would brush it with a wire brush then put some light oil on it and let it be. ANy paint that gets in tehre will just likely burn off, as will the oil once you fire it up.

    But if you must you can put the highest temp black paint you can find on it.

    I would not worry to much personally i would brush it and oil it if it were me. Once the ash is off of it there is nothing to hold moisture up next to it.
  3. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Oiling it is totally sufficient. You are only retarding the rust. Heat +steel or iron = oxidation. Add humidity and you have rust
    ScotO likes this.
  4. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    By all means, wire brush only. This should be part of the annual cleaning.
    ScotO likes this.
  5. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage Minister of Fire

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    good deal, all done. Except, and I don't know the right name for it so I apologize in advance, there was some sort of well cooked "insulation" sitting between the stove body and the (heavy thick plate) rear "shelf" that goes directly below the stack (this helps hold the first "course" of top/rear bricks in place. That did not come out in any sort of usable piece (and it certainly wasn't going back in, in one) and I'm not sure what it is..so I don't know what to buy as a replacement. I don't want to to go the Lopi dealer if it's something I can get at Tractor Supply once the heating season stuff comes into stock. Anyone know what I'm blabbering about? What is it, do we really need it? How do you get it in there without the shelf bunching it up when you put it back (hi temp glue it to the shelf)?
  6. clemsonfor

    clemsonfor Minister of Fire

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    Not sure if i am or not, but in my vogelzang when i first installed it there was an insulation blanket in the top shelf on top of the inside roof but inside. Umm how do i explain??? Ok if you look in the stove pipe hole on top of the stove you were looking right at it. This got sucked into the stack!!! on my test fire and smoked up the house. I disconnected the pipe when cool and ripped it out in 2 pieces and did not put it back nor am i. That wont happen to me twice. I think there is a layer of fire brick under it that rests on the inner roof of the stove on top of the fire tubes.

    Is this simmilar to what your talking about?>
  7. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage Minister of Fire

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    Not really...it seems to have sat between the plate/shelf and whatever that sits on, on the body. It was maybe 1-2" wide (hard to tell what it originally was) and went around the three sides that contacted whatever it sits on. More or less, like a gasket I guess, only it was fiber-y like insulation.
  8. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    It's just a thin piece of ceramic wool insulation. There's no reason a piece of flat fiberglass gasket wouldn't work OK, Like the kind that is used under a door glass. It's a pain to get in there, but if you have some ceramic wool around you can cut a thin strip and get it in there without calling the dealer, 3M spray adhesive work good to hold it in place just until it has weight on it.
  9. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

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  10. vacation

    vacation New Member

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    I think you are talking about Kaowool.... that is the white blanket you are looking at when you stare into the top of your stove. that stuff is garbage in my opinion. Even if it is a type of fiberglass insulation, it is not necessary. And I don't recommend putting more in place of what is damaged or missing. It's just a baffle area and really not that important when it comes to aiding in re-burn of gasses ... In other words, don't worry about it if the bricks fit and don't fall out. :)
  11. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    That is not correct. The ceramic wool blanket is there for a good reason and should be in place. It helps with efficiency, why spend 3K on a stove and then dumb it down by altering it?
    In the OP's situation, it's not a blanket he is talking about. His stove doesn't have one. Instead he is referring to a gasket made of ceramic wool, it prevents smoke from bypassing the entire secondary burn system. It's important!
  12. clemsonfor

    clemsonfor Minister of Fire

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    Secondary smoke seal is important. The blanket I talked about in my stove is NOT important and is a safety hazard in my opinion. As I was test fireing my stove I have a roaring kindeling fire going and the draft sucked the fiberglass blanket out of that area and into the stove pipe, completely clocking the exhaust causing it to smoke the house up!!! Glad it was a test fire and I was not refueling on a thick bed of coals when it happened!!!

    I WILL NOT REPLACE IT IN MY STOVE. But again I am not talking about some seal around the edge of the area., but a fiberglass blanket in the upper area of the stove. If I replaced it the ONLY way it would go back in is if I weighted it like folks on here advised me to do. With like old worn out circle saw blade or 2 pieces of angle iron or something to hold it down in the stove.
  13. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    That sounds like some very strong draft. Often there is a weight on the ceramic blanket to prevent that from happening. You could fashion one out of 1/4" steel plate about 4" sq.. Have you called High Valley about the problem?
  14. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    The stove is designed to have the blanket in place. What makes you think it's not important? It should have a weight on it. It's an easy fix.

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