CO2 and smoke detector

MaryAnn Posted By MaryAnn, Jan 23, 2006 at 5:24 AM

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  1. MaryAnn

    MaryAnn
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    Nov 30, 2005
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    Does the CO2 detector have to be in same room as woodstove? I already have smoke and Co2 detector in my house. Also, if I put a smoke detector in that room, will it go off just from heat from woodstove? I had to take the one out of kitchen because it went off everytime I used oven, small kitchen.
     
  2. AKFireMan

    AKFireMan
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    Jan 19, 2006
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    Every place has diffrent variations of fire and safety codes, where I live you do not "have" to have one in the same room as the wood stove. You are only required to have one on every floor in occupied living spaces (daylight basement, 1st floor, 2nd, etc.). However, for piece of mind I have one installed in the same room as my stove ( living room, combination smoke and corbon monoxide), like the old saying.......ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

    As far as the smoke detector goes the main reason decectors activate is wrong placement. Smoke detectors don't belong in the kitchen, they make other detectoin devices for use there. The heat of the stove does not make a smoke detecor go off. The detectors work in one of two ways one is "ionized", basically the smoke completes an electrical circuit and activates. The other has a light beam and if smoke intgerupts the beam (or steam) it will activate. Remember if you do have on near the stove don't get it too close as some smoke may leak into room when loading or stoking and set off alarm.
     
  3. Chuck Pearson

    Chuck Pearson
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    Dec 9, 2005
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    You probably have a CO (Carbon Monoxide) detector. CO2 is the gas that comes out of your lungs when you breath.
     
  4. Rick

    Rick
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    Nov 23, 2005
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    Great point, many people will let their cars warm up in their garages with the door open. Often, the wind will blow the exhaust back into the garage, and into the home. Fortunately, it is usually just for a few minutes, but it is still better to be safe and back out of the garage first.

    Rick
     
  5. Homefire

    Homefire
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    Jan 16, 2006
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    Please remember this is the internet and to take advice from people you don't know can be very harmful to your health.
    C/O IS NOT HEAVIER THAN AIR THAT IS WHY A BAD FURNACE IN YOUR BASEMENT COULD KILL YOU!!!!

    Please check out any of the c/o detector sites for the real deal on c/o detectors and smoke detectors.
     
  6. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy
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    Jan 23, 2006
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    this is a touchy subject, but, if your smoke dectetor is going off then you have a stove that drafting properly. You should never have smoke coming out of your stove. I always recomend a carbon monoxide detector in any romm a wood, pellet, or gas appliance is installed, its the local code that vent free must have one installed.
     
  7. Hokerer

    Hokerer
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    Nov 18, 2005
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    Guys! Can't we just stop the arguing and call it a draw? Rather than anectdotal statements and terms like "mainly", how 'bout we try some real honest to goodness science.

    The density of dry air at normal atmospheric pressure (760 mm Hg) at 15 degrees C is 1.202 kg/cubic meter

    The density of Carbon Monoxide at normal atmospheric pressure (760 mm Hg) at 15 degrees C is 1.184 kg/cubic meter

    For all intents and purposes you can call them equal (hence the draw). Yes, technically, CO is ever so slightly lighter but, with mixing, air currents, etc. neither is going to end up on the top nor bottom.

    By the way, for comparison sake, everyone is correct when they say that Carbon Dioxide is heavier...

    The density of Carbon Dioxide at normal atmospheric pressure (760 mm Hg) at 15 degrees C is 1.521 kg/cubic meter

    ...that's enough of a difference to be worth talking about.
     
  8. AKFireMan

    AKFireMan
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    Jan 19, 2006
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    How about this for a solution installing a CO dector........You could put one up high or you could put one down low, not too close - not too far. The main thing here is just having something to let you know if there is a problem so you or your family don't get hurt. Sounds like there a lot of "really" technically knowlegable folks on this board with lots of valuable insight. However, I think the question MaryAnn asked was "Are CO detectors required to be in the same room as the stove?" REQUIRED Maybe yes or maybe no but having one just makes good sense. If you have questions or are not comfortable with installing one contact your local fire department as most have programs where they will come and install one for you.
     
  9. cbrodsky

    cbrodsky
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    Jan 19, 2006
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    Actually, an O2 molecule has an atomic weight of 16x2 = 32. Similarly, N2 has an atomic weight of 14x2 = 28. So, CO technically could be considered a "lighter" molecule than a blend of O2 and N2.

    However, molecular diffusion is a very powerful force to overcome the density differences - the reality is that it is very difficult to have much of concentration gradient in a static undisturbed gas when the properties are so similar.
     
  10. Homefire

    Homefire
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    Jan 16, 2006
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    Wow! Hit a nerve with you or what? Wasn't trying to show you up , so don't take it that way.

    I stand by what I said. Do your own research and be safe. :)please:)
     
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