COLD fresh air intake

dirgio Posted By dirgio, Nov 23, 2007 at 3:03 PM

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  1. dirgio

    dirgio
    Member 2.
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    Nov 23, 2007
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    Loc:
    Alberta
    I am currently running a P61A in a newly built 850 sq ft shop. Due to the fact it is well insulated and only 2 small windows, i decided to run a line for the fresh air intake with aluminum dryer vent. On a cold night, the intake line gets covered with a thin layer of frost. Has anyone had experience with this and do you know if this can cause any condensation/rust issues with the stove? Thanks for any insight,
     
  2. freebird77

    freebird77
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Jul 4, 2007
    287
    1
    I have a new p61 and fresh air line also. Mine is plastic that the dealer installed, and it gets dripping with condensation. Even makes a tiny puddle on the hearth pad. One of the members here wrapped his with insulation from Lowes. Im going to do that next week. Yours is icing because of the metal duct work I would guess. It figures hot vs cold equals moisture, so I suppose its to be expected. Although I did question the dealer, and has yet to get back to me. Let us know how you make out.
     
  3. restorer

    restorer
    New Member 2.
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    Aug 16, 2006
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    Loc:
    Salt Lake City, Utah
    That condensation on the outside of the hose? You are chilling the tube and the inside moisture of the building is condensing, if that's the case. Should not affect the inside of the stove, as the drier outside air is actually being used for burning.
     
  4. MrWinkey

    MrWinkey
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    Dec 25, 2006
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    Loc:
    Eastern Washington
    It will not hurt anything....you can get some insulation to wrap it in if this bothers you.

    Possibly it's helping your stove burn better as it's using colder outside air w/ more oxygen and less moisture in it.

    I was planning on driving down and getting some of the pipe to use as an outside air kit but I dont want to brave all the crazies yet.
     
  5. restorer

    restorer
    New Member 2.
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    Aug 16, 2006
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    Salt Lake City, Utah
    Just a thought, you might try insulated flexible ducting. I used it to transfer heat to my office in my old store. Worked well, it was aluminium lined and skinned with a compacted fiberglass layer between.
     
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