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Craigs list find - Le Grand Godin Model 3720

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by rkofler, Sep 28, 2012.

  1. rkofler

    rkofler Burning Hunk

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    They are a classic French parlor stove. Not too bad with coal from what I read, but only so, so with wood. Maybe they meant cubic feet heated.
  3. My Oslo heats my home

    My Oslo heats my home Minister of Fire

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    I'd say 5,000 sq ft is a stretch for that stove. Might be a typo. Coal would probably be the best option in the parlor stove.
  4. geoxman

    geoxman Feeling the Heat

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    coal stove as long as everything inside is intact. The paint looks botched and 20lbs of coal will not last too long. JMHO and good luck
  5. KaptJaq

    KaptJaq Minister of Fire

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    The 3720 is Le Petit Godin, the 3721 is Le Grand Godin.

    The 3720 is a 5kw (about 17,000 btu/hr) stove. With wood you can probably get 2 or 3 hour burns, with coal it is capable of a 12 hour burn. Good coal is about 12,500 btu/lb so to get the 17,000 btu/hr would need about 1.5 lbs of coal per hour.

    It will never heat 5,000 sq ft, maybe 800 - 1,000. The Godin manual says it will heat 70 to 150 cubic meters. 70 cubic meters is 2400 cubic feet. With 8 foot ceilings that is about 300 sq ft. 150 cubic meters comes out to about 700 sq ft.

    The manual, in french, can be found here:
    http://www.godin.fr/notices-siteweb/3720A_petit-godin_4238B-05.pdf

    The paint on the stove in the picture is not right, probably repainted. It is missing it's ash tray. Unless the insides are in mint condition and all the parts are there it is not worth $300.

    Here is a picture of my 3721. It is a 10kw stove (about 35,000 btus/hr). I easily get 12-15 hour burns on coal and 4 to 6 hours on wood. It has been installed since the early 70's and is still used when the temperature is forecast to top out in the 30s or less for more than a couple of days in a row.

    IMG_5455_a1.JPG

    KaptJaq
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Thanks for the info KaptJaq. I was hoping you'd notice this thread.
  7. KaptJaq

    KaptJaq Minister of Fire

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    Starting to see less and less of them here. They have not been imported since the early 90s. Many of the ones I see on the market are either fried from over-firing, rusted out, or covered in paint from years of ornamental use.

    In France they are still manufactured and, especially in rural areas, are still popular. They are easy to burn, give pretty good heat, and are pretty durable. They will burn just about anything, hard coal, soft coal, peat, wood. There is even an oil option that can be dropped into the cylinder on some models. They are sort of like the Fisher stoves are here...

    KaptJaq
  8. Cross Cut Saw

    Cross Cut Saw Feeling the Heat

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    This forum never ceases to amaze me, something that seems so old and random and here someone has one and can tell you all about it.
    PA. Woodsman likes this.
  9. defiant3

    defiant3 Feeling the Heat

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    Wonder how these guys would run on bio-brix?
  10. fbelec

    fbelec Minister of Fire

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    hi kaptjaq

    gorgeous set up.
  11. John Hubertz

    John Hubertz New Member

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    How much does coal cost these days? Is it readily available and still legal to burn for heat?
  12. KaptJaq

    KaptJaq Minister of Fire

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    The price depends on where you live. In coal country (north east Pennsylvanian) it is about $200 a ton picked up. Last time I purchased it was $300 a ton (1 to 5 tons) plus $30 delivery. Recently I've done some basement mining. Post an ad on craigslist looking for old coal in peoples basement. You would be surprised how many older homes still have a half full coal bin that has not been touched in years. The hard part is getting it out. Usually a couple of 5 gallon buckets at a time up a flight of steps. If it was a walk in basement it would have been gone long ago...

    I do not know of any areas where it is not legal to burn coal. There may be some local ordinances so check with your town.

    If you want more information try http://nepacrossroads.com/, a site dedicated to coal burners.

    KaptJaq
  13. precaud

    precaud Minister of Fire

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    I owned one of these for a short time back in the mid-late 80's. Very cute and pretty decent with anthracite coal but totally underwhelming with wood. They probably meant 5000 cu ft. That's maybe doable with coal. These things use a 4" flue and it clogs quickly with wood. Probably best just to admire it and walk on by...
  14. infinitymike

    infinitymike Minister of Fire

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    was surfing through craigslist and saw the add, then I googled the name and came acroos this thread (pretty cool)
    I think it would be neat to have just to play with but not as a primary heat source.

    Does it it load from the top? And is that glass that you can you see the flame through?
    Since its still up for sale maybe he'll take $200
  15. KaptJaq

    KaptJaq Minister of Fire

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    It does load from the top.

    There is a mica window on the lower door. When the fire is shaken down you can see the burning red coals. The window is at the bottom of the coal bed where the air enters and the coal burns. There are deep blue flames on the top of the coal bed where the gasses that come off the coal burn but you cannot see them in a Godin.

    KaptJaq
    PA. Woodsman likes this.
  16. PA. Woodsman

    PA. Woodsman Minister of Fire

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    Oh does that picture bring back memories! That was the stove that was in our house when we bought it in 1989 and it introduced me to wood heat! Ours heated up quickly and threw good heat, I loved that stove...only regret was you couldn't watch the fire because of no glass, only that little mica window. In October of 1992 I won an Efel Symphony catalytic stove in a raffle at a local stoveshop, and after several weeks decided on selling the Godin and using the Efel because it had a glass front and was newer-it was junk!! No wonder they were raffling it off! But the good thing was I took what I liked from the Godin (no cat, firebrick lined inside) and the Efel (glass window, porcelain finish) and combined them and got the Dovre Aurora in 1993 which had all of those features, and I still have him today. But there are times when I think of the old Godin fondly and wonder where he is now; I hope that he is still being used and in good shape. Like they say "you never forget your first love" and he was what got me hooked on this wood heat thing!

    "Burn on old friend, burn on"......:cool:

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