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Creosote build-up on new wood stove

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by cliff88, Dec 28, 2012.

  1. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    cooton005_zps13338e22.jpg

    Definitely birch. Easy to get a fire going eh? bark is the best nature made kindling ;) :)
    Looks like the birch here:
    DSCF0103.JPG

    If the cedar is all roughly that size,
    be like burning kindling, burn hot & fast.

    Should get hot & clean the pipes though.
    Have read about over fires, not sure if small pieces cause it or not.
    Not reason for severe creosote problems unless it's wet & burned slow.
    cliff88 likes this.

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  2. Beetle-Kill

    Beetle-Kill Minister of Fire

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    2-vs.-3 , better draft. Better draft equates to better scavanging of the spent flue gasses. More velocity of those gasses should mean less time in the flue to build up creosote. Hence, longer flue= hotter temps. of gas before it exits the flue.
    Just my take, I may be wrong.;)
    cliff88 likes this.
  3. cliff88

    cliff88 New Member

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  4. cliff88

    cliff88 New Member

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    thanks. good stuff.
  5. cliff88

    cliff88 New Member

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    Thanks for the pic:)
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    With the 30NC in a 600ft space in a milder climate, I think you have about 4X too much stove with a short chimney. This combo is bad enough. The cedar if wet is just adding insult to injury. Open up that additional space and some windows if you want to use this stove. Let it run hot enough to get the stove and flue temps up or get a smaller stove.
    cliff88 and laynes69 like this.
  7. corey21

    corey21 Minister of Fire

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    Your chimney is not high enough and i think you have to big of a stove for that place.
  8. remkel

    remkel Minister of Fire

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    Longer chimney=more draft through the stove.
  9. cliff88

    cliff88 New Member

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    I switched to seasoned birch and I have clean window vs window dripping with creosote with the cedar. I realize chimney isnt protruding enough but
    what would the ideal total length of a straightup chimney be? Mine is presently 14ft and i was planning to add 2 more feet? Also, what is the minimum
    desired temp of the stove top and chimney.(to combat creosote) With 3 pieces of wood, my stove top near chimney pipe with no air is about 350F.
    Thanks.
  10. mywaynow

    mywaynow Minister of Fire

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    Stove top should be 500+ for the peak of the burn. To maintain 350 you are going to have to burn many smaller fires. I would say any pipe that is under 17 feet of straight run will suffer at times from lack of draw. Remember, the stove eats air based upon how fast the exhaust leaves the stove, drawing in air as it does that.

    I routinely see stovetop temps of 800. I use the stove in a basement to heat the entire house (or try to). Just loaded 4 splits into the stove 20 minutes ago and the temps are nearly 500 now, but she is just starting to purr. Creosote is smoke that is wet and cooled. Temperature is the answer and air with good wood provides the temps.
  11. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Try to take it up to 400F and see how that works out. And add that 2ft section to the pipe. 16ft is what most stoves are tested at and it will make your installation legal.
    cliff88 likes this.
  12. rijim

    rijim Member

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    The extra length will increase draft plus the safety factor.
    cliff88 likes this.
  13. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Note that if the pipe sticks out of the rooftop more than 5 ft it will need to be braced.
    cliff88 likes this.
  14. ddahlgren

    ddahlgren Feeling the Heat

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    I thought when I read the nation fire code at least for 2005 it was a minimum of 3 feet off the roof and 3 feet taller than anything within 10 feet away.
  15. cliff88

    cliff88 New Member

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    Update: Thanks for the input , everyone.

    1. Cedar is actually douglas fir. I didnt realize that douglas fir looked so similar to cedar. ie red wood. The bark is definitlley douglas fir.
    2. I retried the "cedar" in the shed at higher temperature and I get no creosote buildup on window so I was doing some weird greenhorn thing.
    3. I dont regret the larger stove. I can run smaller hotter fires and I need large stove to last the night .
    4. I dont even have to think about insulating the walls. Its a soft life with all these heat.
  16. cliff88

    cliff88 New Member

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    2ft in canada and in my englander manual.
  17. jatoxico

    jatoxico Minister of Fire

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    funny ;lol
    cliff88 likes this.

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