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Does split cedar look deceptively dry, but isn't?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by wahoowad, Feb 11, 2006.

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  1. wahoowad

    wahoowad Minister of Fire

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    I split up some cedar logs that looked dry. I do not know how long the tree has been down. It split beautifully and looked bone dry inside. I'm burning a good size split right now and it is burning like an unseasoned split. Does cedar have an abnormally dry appearance yet still not be seasoned enough to burn well? It isn't popping but isn't burning well either.

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  2. kregars

    kregars New Member

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    From my finding...I split (so I could make firestarting sticks/kindling sticks) and found that after about a day it had that 'IM DRY' appearance, however, it seems to hold plenty of moisture under the top layer of what appears dry. I have split, then with a hatchet split and cut into side some sticks varying in size from 1/4in up to 1in. The 1 inchers take about 2 weeks in the kindling bucket to fully cure in my house in the utility closet (also where I store my indoor nearly seasoned wood) for about a week. By the time I am ready or need it, it's ready to go. The Utility room averages ~78degrees and I have a small solar charged fan with the panel outside to recharge and run during the day and continue running at night. Think this thing pushed maybe 25cfm (it's one of the 4in PC fans) and seems to do just enough to move the air around to help speed up the drying process.

    As for the few splits I have of cedar I figure they will be ready in full cured mode by next season and I should be completely set for fire starters for the next few years. :)
  3. count brewski

    count brewski New Member

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    hey kregars, I'm looking for a wood-cuttin' buddy, where are ya gettin' your wood? I got a farm down past Nanjemoy w. acres of it (and connections to LOTS more), but I'm gettin' older (sheeit!) and wiser and would rather not chain and load alone anymore......so mebbe we can make a deal, partner up, or something? lemme know if you're interested, and we'll continue this via e-mail/phone
  4. kregars

    kregars New Member

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    Unfortunately I have lower bck problems, and my manual mauling of the wood is extremely limited to a few rounds a day...worse than that I work right around 89 hours a week (not including being oncall 24/7/365) so my time is extremely limited. I'll likely be one that buys wood for my main stock and cut/split as I come across felled trees.
  5. PaulGuy

    PaulGuy New Member

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    I'm no expert on these matters but were I to hazard a guess I'd say yes to your question. The reason I say this is due to the Cedar Oil present in the wood not the water. It's the oil which gives Cedar it's characterisitc odor and must be relatively non-volatile since Cedar maintains it's odor for many years. Decades in fact. How it effects burning I couldn't say.
  6. snowfreak

    snowfreak New Member

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    I burn alot of cedar and it does have a dry appearance even when freshly cut. I love how the stuff splits even the knarly stuff splits with ease. It's very lightweight, even when green, which makes is seem like it's seasoned. Cedar makes excellent kindling or can take the chill out of the air on those crisp autumn mornings. Makes awesome campwood too (lots of sparks into the air). If your cedar was seasoned it would burn like mad, I have started seasoned cedar kindling(real small stuff) with just a wooden match, the stringy bark takes off like it's got starting fluid built into it. Give it some time to season and you will have no problem burning it.
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