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Door gasket issues

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by tbuff, Feb 1, 2013.

  1. tbuff

    tbuff Feeling the Heat

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    So on my Craftsbury, there is a small 1/2" lip that goes around the entire opening on the stove. On the door there is a groove that the gasket sits in which goes over the lip to create the seal. So here is my question:

    How do I set the hinge side of the gasket so that it doesn't bunch and eventually wear out from opening and closing the door?

    I seem to think the gasket compressing against a flat surface probably would eliminate this issue, but I'm going to be replacing the gasket again soon and want to try a different technique.. I'll post pics later if your having trouble figuring out what I'm talking about.

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  2. topoftheriver

    topoftheriver Member

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    Never encountered that kind of problem on hinge side of the door. As a rule when I replace the gasket, I have a cut out on the hinge side, but I lay the gasket gently so that it doesn't stretch and turn it into the cut out. In the case of no cut out for the gasket, it needs to be butted. Just be sure not to stretch it or it will eventually create a small gap and let air in.
  3. ddddddden

    ddddddden Minister of Fire

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    Different stove, but similar door gasket. My gasket was compressing in the bottom corner near the hinge and not sealing tightly(dollar bill test) in the opposite corner above the latch. Tightening the door latch didn't help much. Replaced the gasket and did not use glue/cement, which allowed me to adjust the bunching of the gasket in its channel. Stretched the gasket a bit thinner in the tight corner and bunched it thicker in the opposite corner. Fine-tuned it a lil' on the next few reloads. All good now. :) The key is to leave yourself extra gasket length for bunching where necessary.
  4. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    Usually, it's best to install the gasket relaxed, not stretched. You must have had some unique problem with yours, ddddddden.

    Be sure you use minimal cement in the groove for the gasket. I think too many gasket problems are probably created by folks filling this groove with cement, such that the gasket has no room into which to compress. That groove should be filled with compressible gasket rope, not incompressible cement.
  5. ddddddden

    ddddddden Minister of Fire

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    Yeah, it might be unique to my stove, but tbuff's issue sounds similar enough that I think experimenting with sliding the gasket around in its channel so that some areas are thicker might do the trick. I didn't really s-t-r-e-t-c-h the gasket much, just sorta worked it around the door inch-worm style, so that I had more material bunched up in one area. . .it might've worked just as well to bunch up extra material all around, but I didn't leave myself enough extra material to do that. Doh! I decided to do this after simply replacing the gasket with a new one didn't solve the problem.

    The groove on my door is deep enough for the gasket to completely fit into; a knife-edge on the door frame fits into the groove to compress the gasket. Someone posted that they did not see much point in using cement/glue on a gasket in a deep groove, and I agree. Worst case = gasket pops out on a reload. . .I don't do hot reloads (300°+), and I typically have the door open 5-10 minutes while futzing with coals, ashes, and wood; doing an unplanned refitting/replacement of the gasket would not be a problem, but the gasket has stayed put with no adhesive.
    As always, YMMV. :)

    More on the topic:

    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/door-gasket-installation.4193/

    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/stupid-question-is-it-hard-to-replace-a-gasket.93226/

    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/articles/stove_gasket
  6. topoftheriver

    topoftheriver Member

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    Tje The cement is recommended. There must have been a reason. Once the gasket had dislodged and hung below the door. At first I couldn't figure out why the fire was blazing. Then I say the gasket. I opened the door, just ajar, and let the flames subside, then pushed the gasket back in wearing welders golves. When the gasket was where it belongs I closed the door. Later, when the weather was milder, I added some adhesive to hold it until the end to the season when I replace the whole thing. There is no fun when the gasket pops out.
  7. ddddddden

    ddddddden Minister of Fire

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    I'm not saying that nobody should use an adhesive for the gasket, just that on my particular stove, the groove is deeper than the gasket, and adhesive is not necessary. Again, YMMV. I'm the only one who loads this stove, and I inspect the gasket when I load the stove. So far, so good. :)
  8. topoftheriver

    topoftheriver Member

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    With all due respect, you may need a thicker gasket. The gasket should have pressure when the door is closed to be sure there is a tight seal. Just my view.
  9. ddddddden

    ddddddden Minister of Fire

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    Pressure on the gasket is provided by a knife-edge "lip" around the door frame that presses into the groove, as described by OP.
    Gasket was provided by the factory.
    Tight seal assured by dollar bill test. :)
  10. topoftheriver

    topoftheriver Member

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    I agree with you but there are different gaskets out there despite what the size says. I prefer a tight fit for security. With deep grooves there is a possibility that the gasket barely snugs against the door frame. It could pass the dollar bill test but that isn't good enough for me. I prefer to be reassured that the gasket fits tight so that there are no leaks. If you want your stove to work correctly and in the method the manufacture suggested, make it tight. The stove will do the rest. A leaky door burns a lot of wood. FYI, I had a problematic door. Took a while but then it came to me, so good luck and stay warm.
  11. tbuff

    tbuff Feeling the Heat

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    Thanks for the input gents. Everythime I replace in a fasion specified by the manufacturer, it bunches up and seems to just push out of the way of the lip. I may try laying it in the groove loosely and stretching just the hinge side slightly. I'll let you know how it works.
  12. ddddddden

    ddddddden Minister of Fire

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    A thicker gasket might work, but it probably would not help with OP's problem (as I read it) of the door fitting tighter on the hinge side. The solution that came to me is to leave yourself extra gasket material and get jiggy with it. . .bunch it in some areas. If you get it perfect and want to redo it with glue/cement for peace of mind, knock yourself out. Be aware that too much glue can saturate the gasket and harden it, and too much cement can get in the way and change the fit.


    This might be a good solution for the problem of one side of the door fitting tighter, but I don't understand exactly what you mean by a "cut out. . ."
  13. topoftheriver

    topoftheriver Member

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    Back to basics. Sure, lay it in gently but don't stretch it. Down the road it will shrink up and pull out, especially near the corner. I have made all of the mistakes. Just lay it down. Sometimes you need to bunch it a bit, expecially at the cut so that you don't end up with a gap after it is heated. Slow and easy is the order of the day when replacing gasketing. Good Luck
  14. topoftheriver

    topoftheriver Member

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    Well, at least my stove, a Jotul, has a groove on the right side of the door (hinge). When I have replaced he gasket, it is fitted around the groove gently without stretching and when it meets on the hinge side, I simply slide the gasket in and bunch it a bit. In that way there is enough material to form a good seal. It works for me. If a stove doesn't have the groove so that you can turn the gasket in, bunch it and make the ends meet before you cement them in. I admit it might be tight shutting the door initially, but after a while it will set right in and seem regular. Try it out.

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