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Q&A Dutchwest stove - wall gets hot !

Post in 'Questions and Answers' started by QandA, Sep 20, 2004.

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  1. QandA

    QandA New Member Staff Member

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    Question:

    Recently we installed Dutchwest small convection wood stove. According to the manufacturer- the clearance from the wall in a corner installation without a rear heat shield is 18 ". We installed it with a 19.5" inch clearance from the corner of stove to the wall. Once the stove heated up to 900 F- the wall became hot. While you could leave your hand on the wall- I am concerned when it is this hot. I want to believe the manufacturer- but the other corner to the wall is approximately 22 " and the wall is not as hot. There is nothing unusual about the installation. The stove has a bottom heat shield and the sheet metal below the stove (on the floor) stays cool. Also- the center of the chimney (stove pipe) is 24 " from the wall- and is a straight shot to a cathedral ceiling using DuraVent pipe.Thus- I am thinking that the wall needs protection and I plan on hanging sheet metal with spacers. I doubt that a rear heat shield will help. Am I right in these conclusions? I am a bit disillusioned that the manufacturer gives this number and then the wall gets hot with it. I could have moved the stove 5-6 " more- but now the chimney etc.- are installed. The last option would be to put a curve piece of stove pipe and move the stove- but I am afraid that will cut down on the draw up the chimney. So- what is the best way you feel to correct (if it needs corrected) the situation? Thanks- in advance- for your assistance.



    Answer:

    First- the manufacturers clearances are probably very safe. A few points to remember:Any surface over 110 degrees feel very hot to you (can't hold your hand on it)...Yet- it takes 400-500 degrees to ignite most combustibles. The UL standards allow for certain materials to get 70-100 degrees hotter than the room temperature -- or approx 150-170 degrees. Also- since it is not too cold yet- the heat from the stove will build up faster and make surfaces hotter. As it gets colder outside- the heat will be sucked away from the stove and the walls will stay cooler. A rear heat shield WILL help- since it's the sum total of the area facing the walls that causes heat buildup. If you do decide to move the stove by jogging the pipe- use a maximum of a 45 degree bend..this will help maintain draft

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