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ecoflo septic tank

Post in 'The Green Room' started by Beno, Feb 28, 2007.

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  1. Beno

    Beno New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    175
    Hi there,

    I'd like to know more about the ecoflo septic tank from people that used it, like performance and price.
    I live in Ottawa, Canada, and I'd like this septic system to serve our next 3 bedrooms house.

    Thanks,
    Beno

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  2. mikeathens

    mikeathens New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2007
    Messages:
    648
    Loc:
    Athens, Ohio
    Don't know anyhting about this system - I looked it up, and it appears that it is simialr to "scat" and "fast" systems; I believe at least one of these is a norinco product.

    What is important in wastewater treatment is reducing/eliminating nutrients (BOD) and pathogens prior to either a surface or susbsurface discharge. If you live in an area where soils are good, you might be better off sticking with a standard septic tank/leach field system (if permitted). THese systems are designed to use the soil as a treatment media - the septic tanks reduces TSS (and BOD), with the soils removing ammonia, BOD, and pathogens. The advanced treatment systems typically are used in areas with sub-par soils, allowing the peat or other biofilter do the work that the soils would otherwise. One thing to keep in mind with these advanced bio-filters is the need for pumps - dosing pumps, discharges pumps, etc. These are electricity consumers, not necessary with a gravity system.

    There are tons of gimmicky biofilters out there - most do the same thing. Look up the fast and scat systems on the net.

    In any case, you will most likely require disinfection at the end - either chlorination/dechlor or UV. More maintenance and energy costs. It looks like the ecoflo simply uses a buried gravel/rock bed for effluent disposal.
  3. Sandor

    Sandor Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2005
    Messages:
    917
    Loc:
    Deltaville,VA
    I have installed (actually, my subcontractor) 3 of these systems. The last one being about 2 years ago.

    We only used the EcoFlo for water front properties that could not use a conventional septic system. This is to stop effluent from leaching into the Chesapeake Bay.

    Installing an EcoFlo was a last resort. Average price was about 12K USD. (Worst was 17K) The price varies because of the what type of drainfield was needed, and whether the system needed a pump chamber or not.

    These are engineered systems that need maintenance. If you need electronics and a pump chamber, a maintenance contract is mandatory - and most systems come with at least a one year warranty. If I remember correctly, the annual agreement was like 150 bucks. This does not include changing the Peat Moss, which must be done about every 7 years.

    The EcoFlo chamber itself is filled with Peat Moss, that acts like a filter medium. It actually creates a good environment for nature to do its work on the nasties.

    The system does work, but again, its a last resort.

    I assume you cannot install a convential septic.
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