Fire stop goo

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by tutu_sue, Aug 3, 2007.

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  1. tutu_sue

    tutu_sue
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    What kind of fire stop sealant can I use to fill around the hot water baseboard pipes that come up from the basement? Also any ideas on how i can fill two holes that were drilled for the bathroom radiator by mistake? The basement ceiling below them is finished and I can't get to them from underneath. Thanks.
     
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  2. begreen

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    How large a gap are you trying to fill around the pipe?
    What is the bathroom floor surface? How large is the hole you are trying to fill?
     
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  3. tutu_sue

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    The gaps around the pipes are 1/4".

    The floor is vinyl, but will eventually be tile. The holes I'm trying to fill are 1".

    Thanks.
     
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  4. begreen

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    You can stuff some fiberglass insulation around the pipe or foam insulation rod. Keep it flexible, the hot water pipes expand and contract.

    The backer board for the tile floor will cover the hole. But if you want a temporary patch, the hole can be probably be filled with a bit of FixAll or Bondo.
     
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  5. Gooserider

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    I'd probably try to stuff something like foam pipe insulation around the pipes, but agree you need something that will be able to move with the pipe.

    The use of bondo or equivalent to fill the other holes makes sense, though you probably will need to fill the void under the hole with some sort of material or other wise put a "floor" under the hole to keep the bondo from falling through. What I'd be tempted to try is to make a round peice of shirt cardboard a bit bigger than the hole and fasten a string to the center of it. Push the cardboard through the hole, then pull it back up with the string to flatten it against the underside of the floor - squirt a good bunch of glue in the hole and smear the cardboard around to glue it to the wood, holding it up with the string until it dries - this will give a "floor" for the bondo patch.

    I would also consider using a file or something like that to "flare" the upper edge of the hole so that the patch won't fall or get pushed through the hole. (probably easier to do before installing the "floor" cardboard)

    Gooserider
     
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  6. wg_bent

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    How about just pounding in a plug into the holes?
     
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  7. Hogwildz

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    While roofing, in a pinch we would use a piece of sheet metal to cover small holes. And those small holes were much larger than 1" :).
    Sometimes we would even use the lid off a 5 gallon roofing cement can. Cut the pc of metal about 6" x6" or 6" round and screw it down tight with some coarse threaded drywall screws. Then set you substrate for the new floor over top. You'll never know they are there afterwards. Tapered or not, bondo in time might crack and fall through.
     
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