Firebrick question

James0816 Posted By James0816, Nov 21, 2006 at 1:20 PM

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  1. James0816

    James0816
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    Nov 13, 2006
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    being the novice that I am, I have to ask....what exactly is firebrick used for? Is it a special type of brick made to withstand heat as opposed to regular brick? Does it hold/radiate heat? thx
     
  2. Dave_1

    Dave_1
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    Jul 19, 2006
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  3. wg_bent

    wg_bent
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    Nov 19, 2005
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    While it may hold some heat, depending on the type, it may hold a lot less than you think. There are really two types I'm aware of. A ceramic and a cinder base. The Cinder base looks just like a cinderblock, but will withstand temps inside a firebox. These are really high temp insulators, and are intended to keep the firebox at high temps to more efficiently burn the wood gasses. The Ceramic type perform the same task but are much more dense and will hold a bit more heat.

    The final stone like material that is used inside stoves although on a much more limited basis is Soapstone. Not to be confused with some stoves that have soapstone tacked onto the outside. Soapstone on the inside will also act as a way to keep the firebox temps up and is very durable inside a firebox, but it also stores a large amount of heat.

    For similar examples of stoves that have the different type of material, consider all inserts.

    Cinder: Osburn or Quadrafire
    Ceramic: Morso or Country Stoves
    Soapstone: Hearthstone
     
  4. James0816

    James0816
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    Nov 13, 2006
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    my application would be for outdoor use only. I am getting ready to build a fireplace/grill unit out of brick. So basically I am trying to determine if I need to use firebrick or just use the standard brick. I don't want it to fall apart after several uses which is why I was looking at the firebrick due to temps of burning wood. I was also exploring the idea that the firebrick will help with the heating/cooking surface of the grill if it helps radiate heat better.
     
  5. wg_bent

    wg_bent
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    Nov 19, 2005
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    Ahh, sorry wrong context. I did ask that earlier this summer also...same reason. Didn't really get a good answer, but I tried an experiment. I put a couple bricks under a good hot fire in the back yard "fire pit". they broke. Now, if they were actually part of essentially a brick fireplace...I have no idea...but I'd sure hate to have to rebuild it. Also, I know the stone around my house...pretty much all river rock, breaks in fires too.
     
  6. James0816

    James0816
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    Nov 13, 2006
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    i would have to say that judging by that comment, it would definately be a good idea then to line it with the firebrick.
     
  7. hosspuller

    hosspuller
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    Dec 17, 2005
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    One other condition is protecting the firebrick from water. Even though dry firebrick will stand heat, water soaked firebrick will crumble when heated. Build your hearth with a chimney cap
     
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