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First home, Huntsman wood burner questions and advice.

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by Chevy Power, Oct 22, 2013.

  1. Chevy Power

    Chevy Power New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2013
    Messages:
    10
    Loc:
    Norton Ohio
    I closed on my house almost a month ago and have been and still am very busy. It is getting cooler here in northeast Ohio. I took a lot of pictures, you can see the floor has hardibacker on it, which is a whole other story that I do not have a lot of back details on. I can only make educated guesses, the woman was selling the house because her husband left her and I assume he tried to install tile on this fairly uneven floor. Some leveling and a laminate in this section is in order for now.

    Now the reason I came here was to get a few ideas on what I have, and to post a lot of pictures to get some info and advice clearances and the quality of this wood burner. I normally do this research before posting but time is slim and the cold is coming.

    Here are a many pictures. Thanks to all who help, Matthew.

    [​IMG]

    This had a lot of ashes in it I cleaned it out and never took the partially charred log out.
    [​IMG]

    I am a fitter/welder and it is hard to tell from this pic but it looks to be some poorly made stick welds
    [​IMG]

    Front inside view
    [​IMG]

    Looks to be a small gap where you can see dust. The outside and attic section look to be in great shape.
    [​IMG]

    Back right wall clearance
    [​IMG]

    Height above floor
    [​IMG]

    Back left wall clearance
    [​IMG]

    Left side stove pipe clearance
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Here you can sort of see how the right corner of the stove overhangs the entry way to the kitchen. I am open to ideas and suggestions for finishing this area. Maybe rip it out, or maybe it is okay finish the floor and enjoy the low gas bills.
    [​IMG]

    Thanks again!

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  2. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2006
    Messages:
    4,908
    Loc:
    Schenectady, NY
    A couple questions, what is under the hardibacker?

    What is behind the stone?

    Matt
  3. 930dreamer

    930dreamer Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2013
    Messages:
    212
    Loc:
    Amarillo, TX
  4. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2006
    Messages:
    4,908
    Loc:
    Schenectady, NY
    The stone wouldn't, but if there is wood framing behind it, that would.

    Matt
  5. MDFisherman

    MDFisherman Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2012
    Messages:
    135
    Loc:
    So. MD
    Have you looked inside the flue yet? I would give it a sweep for sure.

    The clearances are for sure tight. The floor could be easily solved by laying down some type of 2" thick brick/block/paver that extends past the stove. You can always set them down dry for now and mortar them in after burning season. Or use them temporarily until you find something you like and install in the spring.

    For the wall clearances, they are too tight. You need to pull it away from the wall.

    How close is the flue to the wall where it penetrates the ceiling?
  6. Chevy Power

    Chevy Power New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2013
    Messages:
    10
    Loc:
    Norton Ohio
    Thanks to everyone for the help, I finally am moved in to the house. Living out of boxes and figuring out how I managed to accumulate so many things.

    I am unsure what is behind the wall, I can assume it is it like the rest of the house, 2x4 construction, near the bottom of the wall I can see mesh that was installed behind the stone. I have not looked inside the flue. It is a straight shot out, I will inspect it before I have a fire.

    This is what is under the Hardibacker. Appears to be 1/4" plus 3/4" of tounge and groove pine. (idk what to call it, about 3 times older than I am flooring).
    [​IMG]

    This is another picture, hard to read the tape from this. Hardibacker was over this with only one screw in it, appears to be an old HVAC vent hole.
    [​IMG]

    This shows the old HVAC vent..
    [​IMG]

    Using my tape to show the entry to the kitchen and how pulling it out will interfere.
    [​IMG]

    Tile in living room, appears to be proper install.
    [​IMG]

    Here is the base of the tile (basement step entry).
    [​IMG]

    Right side of stove clearance
    [​IMG]

    Left side
    [​IMG]

    Left side plumb
    [​IMG]

    The floor is very uneven under this section, the house was built in 1927, so some areas are unlevel, and this area appears to be one of the most uneven of all.

    Right now I want to have a nice floor to walk on instead of the hardibacker, but I want to do the floor right. Mostly, (with the cold ohio winter coming up) I want to be able to burn wood without worrying about my house burning down.
  7. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,793
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    If that is single wall pipe, it needs to be at least 18" from any combustible surface, including drywall. The stove needs to be 36" from the nearest combustible surface, in all directions. (studs in wall or drywall if it is behind the stone.) The stone is not masonry and I don't think it qualifies for any clearance reductions. But even if there was brick there it would be inadequate to achieve the 12" showing. That requires an NFPA 211 ventilated wall shield. There is no hearth on this stove. It needs one. Hardibacker board is not a proper hearth material

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