1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

first stack

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Devin86, May 27, 2013.

  1. Devin86

    Devin86 New Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2013
    Messages:
    24
    Loc:
    Shinnston, WV
    Well I managed to land a 028WB and x27 off of Dexter and cant say enough saw was nicer than stated and he set me up with a heck of a deal on a X27 a file and some extra pull cord.

    [​IMG]

    This is what I managed to cut, split , haul and stack this weekend. My only worry is I was hoping that this would be my only source of heat this year ( heated with electric oil filled heaters last two years $$$$) but I am thinking my wood will not be dry enough by then. Especially since I was looking at a vapor fire. May be a pellet furnace in my future for this year. I will be heating 1500SQ FT and it is one story but worried if I go with a pellet stove I wont get warmth thru the whole house and have our first child due in Dec.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Sorry for the rambling just excited to finally break into wood burning.
    smokinj, 343amc, zap and 6 others like this.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Augie

    Augie Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2012
    Messages:
    468
    Loc:
    North Of Canada
    Look for pine, maple, or another soft wood and it will be dry by this winter. You can also rig up a DIY solar kiln to get that wood nice and dry. here is a link to a Virginia Tech Site about doing just that. I have one rigged up with little more than a 10x20 black plastic tarp. http://sbio.vt.edu/about/extension/vtsolar_kiln/

    I'm letting the maple I have air dry and I have about a cord or so of oak tented up, hoping that I will be able to burn that this winter.
    ScotO likes this.
  3. wesessiah

    wesessiah Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2012
    Messages:
    183
    Loc:
    Lincolnton NC
    another type to look for is tulip poplar as common as it is in the southeast. there's a lot of it, and it's straight/easy to split.
    i'm not strong at identifying wood, but what kind do you have there? some of it looks like red oak to me.
  4. Devin86

    Devin86 New Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2013
    Messages:
    24
    Loc:
    Shinnston, WV
    I think there is a mix here of locust and cherry but I am not 100% sure.
  5. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    that Dexterday is a heck of a guy, ain't he? First class, all the way....

    looks like a nice mix of locust in your stack there, I'd be taking some of Augie's and wes's ideas....get some softer, faster drying shoulder season wood. Silver maple, red maple, tulip poplar, pine, and cedar....all good stuff, and when split small to medium (4x4" to 5x5") will dry out quickly, most likely in time for this winter.
  6. Devin86

    Devin86 New Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2013
    Messages:
    24
    Loc:
    Shinnston, WV
    Yes he is for sure a first class guy. I will start looking for soft woods seem to be having problems with my wood id a little but I will be working on that.
  7. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    lots of good information online. and lots of good field books out there that can help you. Also, I think there is a tree ID app for your smartphone.....
  8. DexterDay

    DexterDay Guest

    Thanks for the kind words ;em

    As for the wood.. Look for the species stated above. Dead standing is always a help.

    If interested in pellets? A pellet furnace can be nice. I am a little biased and yes you have to buy pellets. But I also spend a lot of money on saws, splitters and the like. I use between 2-3 ton of pellets a year and about 2-3 cord of wood a year and keep 3,000 sq about 74*-76* all year :) Withna pellet furnace, that means the ENTIRE house is that warm. Not just the living room and bedrooms are 66*.

    So I spend between $350-$475 a year on pellets? I spent 2 times more than that on my Ms460 mag. To each there own I guess. The wood helped me reduce my pellet consumption by about 1.5-2 ton a year.

    I love wood and pellets for different reasons. Either way, it beats the $3,600 a year I was spending on LP. So even if I spend some money on equipment? I still make out in the end.

    Cheers my friend. Was a pleasure to deal with you.

    image.jpg
    smokinj likes this.
  9. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Devin, the first thing I'd do would be to get those splits smaller and also stack only one single row on the pallets. Most of your stacking is great because it is not really tight which lets air move through and that is the biggest key to drying wood. Good luck.
  10. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2009
    Messages:
    8,426
    Loc:
    So Cent ALASKA
    Good idea with the pallet & 90° brace.

    Sun & wind for drying wood, more of each, the better. Wind (good air circulation) most important . ;)
  11. Devin86

    Devin86 New Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2013
    Messages:
    24
    Loc:
    Shinnston, WV
    Hope to finish out that stack this weekend. I will be looking for some softer wood and making my splits smaller. I think the pallets will work out pretty well ends are solid have a firework wholesaler next door so I just run the ATV over and toss as many of the good ones as I want on the trailer so I will make them work. Thanks to everyone for all of the helpful advice.
  12. Devin86

    Devin86 New Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2013
    Messages:
    24
    Loc:
    Shinnston, WV
    Cut some more wood today was still pretty wet in the woods so I had to chain up pretty sure I am up to a full cord now LOL

    [​IMG]
  13. paul bunion

    paul bunion Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2013
    Messages:
    765
    Loc:
    NJ
    Looks like a good start. You might want to sort the wood a little as you stack, especially if you want to burn some of it this coming winter. The upper part of your pile looks a lot drier than what is under. Separate what will be good from what won't be and your fire will be a lot warmer. Some extra space under the pallets will help the bottom layers dry much quicker. If you have access to a lot of pallets double them up. Anyway, just keep stacking it up and three years from now it won't matter.
  14. DexterDay

    DexterDay Guest

    Nice lookin saw in that truck! ;)

    LOOKIN Good! Keep it up!!
  15. Big Donnie Brasco

    Big Donnie Brasco Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    May 29, 2012
    Messages:
    314
    Loc:
    East Central Kansas
    That Dexter is one of the nicest, most honest straight-shooting guys I have ever known! I got my Stihl 036 from him!
    I am also a NOOB but I have learned a lot on here, I stack my wood with as much air circulation as I can get through it!

    [​IMG]
  16. Paulywalnut

    Paulywalnut Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Messages:
    2,087
    Loc:
    Kennett Square, PA
    Good looking stacks there Donnie. Love the cross pieces securing the cord.
  17. bluedogz

    bluedogz Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2011
    Messages:
    1,199
    Loc:
    NE Maryland
    Worst case scenario, if you feel like hoofing over here I have hickory and BL 2 years CSS you can have to keep that baby warm.
  18. Ram 1500 with an axe...

    Ram 1500 with an axe... Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Messages:
    1,760
    Loc:
    New Jersey
    Looking good... Keep it up...
  19. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2008
    Messages:
    15,972
    Loc:
    Anderson, Indiana
  20. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2010
    Messages:
    5,419
    Loc:
    Southern IN
    Pretty much just re-hashing what's been said here:
    Get a moisture meter to help until you get the feel for dry wood. Single-row that stack, separating out the lighter stuff that resonates when banged together, and re-splitting the bigger ones. As BwS (Dennis) says, wind is your friend....stack loose. If that BL had the bark off when you cut it, a lot of it might be pretty dry. Cherry will dry pretty quick if not split too big.
    Soft Maple and Poplar are the quickest-drying stuff out there. Even if cut fresh, it should be burnable this winter....sooner you can split and stack, the better. You might contact a local tree service and see if they will drop a load off free, or you can pick it up if you're quick, when they are nearby. Have them cut to 16" if you don't know what stove you're getting yet.
    I would go ahead and get the stove, avoiding the extra step of the pellet stove. Lots of knowledgeable folks here to help with that decision. :cool:
    Awesome offer, bluedogz! Way to help a brutha out! :cool:
    Devin86, what you could do this winter is, sort through the wood as you bring it in to burn. Toss the stuff that seems heavy to the side and trade it to Blue for some stuff that's ready to go. But I'm tellin' ya, if you get a bunch of soft Maple split and stacked soon, you'll be good to go. You'll have enough dry stuff to start on, and the Maple will have a couple extra months. You may have to monitor your chimney liner for build-up more often (once a month starting out) and take appropriate action. Once you have dry wood, a check halfway through the season should be plenty.
  21. Devin86

    Devin86 New Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2013
    Messages:
    24
    Loc:
    Shinnston, WV
    Huge thank you to Bluedogz and everyone else I think my current plan is to go with a low buck used pellet stove this year and maby next year while I continue to build up wood I really eventually want to end up with something forced into the duct work looking heavly at the Kuma Vapor Fire it hase been very wet here recently so I have not been able to cut much more but I will stay on it all summer and put all of the wonderful advice I have been given to work.
  22. DexterDay

    DexterDay Guest

    I just got a good deal on pellet stove today. A 2005 Quadrafire Castile pellet stove, with Hearth Pad, and venting. All for $360. I paid $300 for the stove and the guy delivered it for $60. :) Its the Castile that was in the For Sale section here. The guy drove almost 3 hrs (2hr 45 min) one way from Pa to Ohio. Super nice guy that just wanted it gone.

    Now is the time to buy. Plus Pellet stoves have thermostats (most do) and will keep the house a more constant temp.

    Keep an eye on CL. There are great deals out there.

Share This Page