1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

First Time Splitting Oak

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Bigg_Redd, Nov 2, 2013.

  1. tsquini

    tsquini Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2009
    Messages:
    584
    Loc:
    North Shore, MA
    Oak is easy to split when freshly cut. I cut some standing dead black locust. My chainsaw would do better cutting through stone. Splitting by hand, forget about it. Even my resident beaver passed on it.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. clemsonfor

    clemsonfor Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2011
    Messages:
    2,469
    Loc:
    Greenwood county, SC
    Oak and walnut all hand split. There is now this much stacked to the left of the pic and there is about 12 ft to the right that is hand split as well.

    Attached Files:

  3. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2008
    Messages:
    3,975
    Loc:
    Shelton, WA
    I've been on the Fiskars bandwagon for. . . 5 or so years, but this was some twisty yard oak with no center. This stuff wasn't coming apart for anyone.
  4. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2008
    Messages:
    3,975
    Loc:
    Shelton, WA
    It's getting burnt next year, ready or not.
  5. RORY12553

    RORY12553 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2011
    Messages:
    510
    Loc:
    Southern NY
    I hate elm with a passion. A buddy of mine has some oak at his house that has been down since last October. Not bucked so i'm hoping it won't be that bad.
  6. clemsonfor

    clemsonfor Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2011
    Messages:
    2,469
    Loc:
    Greenwood county, SC
    No it will still be green. And wet as all get out on the inside.
  7. dmmoss51

    dmmoss51 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2013
    Messages:
    355
    Loc:
    Michigan
    I've been working on building my supply of all Red Oak lately... Got a buddy who had two large OAK's uprooted in a windstorm last year. The Rounds are HUGE we have to at least get them in half with a sledge and wedge to get to the point where we can think hydraulic splitter (wish I could pivot). F-150 a level load with 4.5 rounds split and stacked neatly! They are big trees that are going to keep me quite warm from 2015 - ???? and it's Free. Was at his place on Sunday and he pointed out the dead hickory he wants to take down and will be my next project to cut up for him. Never burned hickory before but think it should do well.

    I don't think the oak is that bad to split but definitely not as easy as pine!

    EDIT: that F-150 is a long box btw.
  8. clemsonfor

    clemsonfor Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2011
    Messages:
    2,469
    Loc:
    Greenwood county, SC
    Hickory has btus like oak its a pain to split as its more stringy and holds on more than white oak. It dries a bit quicker than oak but not much.

    Some pine is a pain to split!!
  9. dmmoss51

    dmmoss51 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2013
    Messages:
    355
    Loc:
    Michigan
    I think Pine is such a genaric term there have to be differences. Here we have mostly white and red pine which seems to split pretty well... It's gopher wood around here though so would only use it as camp wood not stove wood.
  10. clemsonfor

    clemsonfor Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2011
    Messages:
    2,469
    Loc:
    Greenwood county, SC
    Kind of like oak there like 60 species
  11. Elderthewelder

    Elderthewelder Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2006
    Messages:
    644
    Loc:
    Everett, Washington
    Your going to have to split it small and stack it in the direct sun / wind. not in your shed. and even then it wont be ready in a year. will need to mix it in with your hot fir / pine fire to be able to burn the moisture off it and get it to burn. been there done that!!

    you are better off to stack it for 2 to 3 years someplace out of the way and enjoy the true btu's that it will provide
  12. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2008
    Messages:
    3,975
    Loc:
    Shelton, WA
    That's not happening. It's firewood, not fine cheese.
    HDRock, TimJ, osagebow and 1 other person like this.
  13. clemsonfor

    clemsonfor Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2011
    Messages:
    2,469
    Loc:
    Greenwood county, SC
    Haha
  14. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    29,153
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    I only burn Camerbert Oak.
  15. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    I guess you can throw Oak into the same group as cheese and wine, it gets better with age, my wife however.....
    TimJ likes this.
  16. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2008
    Messages:
    3,731
    Loc:
    Eastern Central PA
    And stall a 32 ton splitter on knots when its dry.
  17. lobsta1

    lobsta1 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2007
    Messages:
    220
    Loc:
    Eastern Ma.
    Unless you have a pre-EPA stove, what it will be is an exercise in frustration! As soon as you close the door on the stove, the flame will go out. Your secondary burn will probably take 1 1/2 hours to get started. I don't know if you are in one of the no fire zones, but if you are, someone will drop a dime on you. Eventually you will swear that oak is the worst wood to burn. Etc. Etc. Etc

    All kidding aside, elderthe welder gave you excellent advice.
    Al
  18. Seanm

    Seanm Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2012
    Messages:
    440
    Loc:
    SE BC Canadian Rockies
    I read this thread because I was curious about oak (none around here) and how it split and couldn't help but notice more then one response that pine is a pita to split. How come? I burn lots of lodgepole and its easy to split green or seasoned. Ponderosa Pine is a bit harder to split and since its lower btus I leave it for others. What Pine are you guys thinking is hard to split? I would have thought that some of the pines that are out east are much lower btus then what we get in BC so naturally assumed it would split easier. Not trying to hijack this thread but wouldn't mind knowing. Thanks
  19. clemsonfor

    clemsonfor Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2011
    Messages:
    2,469
    Loc:
    Greenwood county, SC
    Southern yellow pine when knotty. This term covers many pines but are the eastern building species.
  20. Charles1981

    Charles1981 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2013
    Messages:
    590
    Loc:
    Michigan
    All the oak I've gotten has been the easiest to split with my maul of many of the wood types. I think sometimes it depends on how you buck it but not really sure. I've gotten plenty of ash that was just impossible to get through even with a sledge and wedge. I've had to noodle down so many pieces of ash gah. I don't think I get the best specimens in my log length loads however though.
  21. MrWhoopee

    MrWhoopee Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2011
    Messages:
    567
    Loc:
    Shingletown, Northern California (elev. 4000 ft.)
    WET firewood. In your part of the country, the MC will probably be north of 35% after one year.
  22. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 20, 2008
    Messages:
    6,446
    Loc:
    S.NH- Mass's smoking section
    A few knots, and you may have to blast. However- fresh cut, fewer knots- both red and white split like a dream. With a sharp maul, there's honestly almost no effort beyond the weight of the falling maul up to ~10" wide.
  23. MrWhoopee

    MrWhoopee Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2011
    Messages:
    567
    Loc:
    Shingletown, Northern California (elev. 4000 ft.)
    Assuming it is a native species:

    http://cru.cahe.wsu.edu/CEPublications/eb0440/eb0440.pdf

    Quercus garryana
    Oregon white oak is the only oak in the
    state. There is very little of it cut even though
    its fuel value is greater than that of any other
    tree growing in Washington. It is cut locally
    for fuel, furniture, and wedges.
    This is a slow growing species and is
    often poorly formed. It is commonly found in
    limited pure stands on dry, rocky sites where
    other species will not grow.

Share This Page